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Latest Test Studio Brings New Reports and HTML Results

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Test Studio continues to make test automation even easier with the first major release of 2017. 2017-03-10T14:33:30Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Iliyan Panchev
Categories: Companies

How We Test Software: Chapter Four Part II—Developer Tools

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Have you wondered how the teams working on Telerik products test software? In the final chapter of our detailed guide, we give you deeper insight into the processes of our Web Division. 2016-12-13T20:41:09Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Antonia Bozhkova
Categories: Companies

How We Test Software: Chapter Four—Telerik Developer Tools

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Have you wondered how the teams working on Telerik products test software? In the next chapter of our detailed guide, we give you deeper insight into the processes of our Dev Tools division. 2016-11-29T13:00:00Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Antonia Bozhkova
Categories: Companies

How We Test Software: Chapter Three Part III—Telerik Business Services

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Have you wondered how the teams working on Telerik products test software? In the next chapter of our detailed guide, we give you deeper insight into the processes of our Business Services. 2016-11-21T19:48:49Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Anton Angelov
Categories: Companies

Test Studio R3 Release Webinar Recording and Q&A

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Just a few weeks ago the 3rd major for 2016 release of Telerik Test Studio ushered in loads of new features like Angular 2 support, API Testing Fiddler integration, support for NativeScript and iOS10, and more. These were all demoed at our usual post-release webinar last week. Here's a recap of the Q&A session. 2016-10-21T18:24:16Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Antonia Bozhkova
Categories: Companies

Introducing Fiddler for OS X Beta 1

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Over the years, we have received numerous requests from our user community to provide a Fiddler build for OS X. So we have ported the latest version of Fiddler to the Mono Framework which in turn supports OS X—and you can grab the beta bits today. 2016-10-17T13:49:40Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Tsviatko Yovtchev
Categories: Companies

How We Test Software: Chapter Three Part II—Telerik Business Services

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Have you wondered how the teams working on Telerik products test software? We continue with the next chapter in our detailed guide, giving you deeper insight into our very own processes. This chapter focuses on Telerik Business Services. 2016-10-12T12:30:00Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Anton Angelov
Categories: Companies

Test Studio Goes Big with Angular, Mobile and API Testing

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
The third major Test Studio update of the year just came out today and it adds loads of new bits to our API testing and Mobile testing solutions. 2016-09-28T15:16:16Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Antonia Bozhkova
Categories: Companies

How We Test Software: Chapter Three—Telerik Business Services

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Have you wondered how the teams working on Telerik products test software? In the next chapter of our detailed guide, we give you deeper insight into the processes of our Business Services. 2016-09-09T14:53:23Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Anton Angelov
Categories: Companies

How We Test Software: Chapter Two—Telerik Platform Part Two

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Have you wondered how the teams working on Telerik products test software? We continue with the next chapter in our detailed guide, giving you deeper insight into our very own processes. 2016-08-24T12:30:00Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Angel Tsvetkov
Categories: Companies

Test Studio R2 Release Webinar Wrap Up and Q&A

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Last week we hosted a release webinar on the latest Test Studio features, including a new API tester. Here's a recap of some of the interesting questions we got during the live webcast. 2016-07-22T14:34:27Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Antonia Bozhkova
Categories: Companies

Be an API Testing Hero with the New Test Studio

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
The new Test Studio release is here! We are now offering GIT integration, MS Edge Support, provisioning for Android device along with the Test Studio for APIs Beta. 2016-06-30T13:12:42Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Antonia Bozhkova
Categories: Companies

Webinar Follow-up: New Testing Battlefields

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
Four testing experts recently explored testing beyond the "traditional" desktop and web, including the new battlefields of Mobile and IoT. Read on for a recap or to watch a webinar replay. 2016-06-21T12:20:00Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Jim Holmes
Categories: Companies

Are You Ready for the New Testing Battlefields?

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
A software-defined way of living and the digital transformation of traditional businesses are not the future. They are already here. This brings challenges to testers and developers alike. Join this one-hour roundtable discussion with industry experts to hear what’s new in testing today. 2016-06-13T15:20:23Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Antonia Bozhkova
Categories: Companies

Telerik and Testdroid Webinar Bonus Q&A

Telerik TestStudio - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 00:55
In this blog, Ville-Veikko Helppi tackles some of the unanswered questions from the webinar. 2016-06-06T14:55:06Z 2017-04-27T22:42:05Z Ville-Veikko Helppi
Categories: Companies

Installed version of OneAgent now displayed on Host pages

You no longer need to enter edit mode on a host page or browse through your environment’s Deployment status page to figure out which version of OneAgent is running on each of your hosts.

To view the installed version of OneAgent on a monitored host

  1. Select Hosts in the navigation menu.
  2. Select the host you’re interested in.
  3.  On the Host page, click the Properties and tags link to view the properties of the host, including the installed OneAgent version.

OneAgent version

The post Installed version of OneAgent now displayed on Host pages appeared first on Dynatrace blog – monitoring redefined.

Categories: Companies

Dynatrace Detroit – A new location for continued innovation

Dynatrace Detroit is home to hundreds of employees whose responsibilities range from engineering to finance, to customer service, and everything else in-between. Our new home is 2000 Brush St. Suite 501, Detroit MI!

Local Detroiters may know Dynatrace as a former business unit of the mainframe services company Compuware. We love the city, and our pride in Detroit was further elevated when we moved from the suburbs to downtown in 2003. Building the 1.1M square foot headquarters in place of vacant buildings and open land certainly wasn’t a popular trend at the time. Our decision to build here arguably triggered a Detroit resurgence which was advanced by Dan Gilbert and other Detroit entrepreneurs and business leaders.

Burdened by the need to meet short term shareholder value across a collection of disparate business units under Compuware (CPWR), the APM growth-focused business unit separated as Dynatrace LLC under the private equity firm Thoma Bravo. We sold our building and got back to our roots; focusing on what really matters — innovating for our customers with a badass AI-powered, full-stack and automated application performance monitoring system. We call it Digital Performance Management.

Now we bring our energy, enthusiasm and drive to new offices attached to Ford Field — an 11-minute walk from our previous home — ready for the next groundbreaking chapter at Dynatrace.

Dynatrace Detroit - Office Culture

Office Culture

I’d describe our culture as “start-up mentality meets stable market leadership.” Our two major competitors collectively hold less market share than Dynatrace, and have yet to turn a profit despite one going public and the other being acquired. Our leadership position affords us the opportunity to disrupt the industry and ourselves through constant innovation and reinvention. It also funds world-class Guardian training programs, craft beer on tap, team gatherings, and a sense of stability and confidence in the workplace.

The collection of images above — taken last week in the span of about ten minutes — paints an accurate picture of a “day-in-the-life” at Dynatrace. You’ll notice our inviting spirit, virtual workers at hoteling desks, Stand-up/SCRUM meetings, and an ever-growing class of PDP students in training to serve customers as the app-monitoring experts we call Guardians.

Dynatrace Detroit Employees

If you’d like to join in the fun, and experience the satisfaction that comes with helping to redefine monitoring, we’re hiring. Check out openings and a learn bit more about us here.

The post Dynatrace Detroit – A new location for continued innovation appeared first on Dynatrace blog – monitoring redefined.

Categories: Companies

Calling for Columbian Jenkins users!

The Jenkins project has learned that a company is trying to register "Jenkins" as a trademark in Columbia. This is alarming for us, and we are trying to oppose it. In order to do this effectively, we need to hear from Colombian users of Jenkins. The Jenkins project owns a trademark "Jenkins" in the U.S., through a non-profit entity SPI Inc. According to experts on the subject citing the "Washington Convention", our trademark registration in the U.S. does give us some strength in the argument to oppose this. To successfully mount this argument however, we need to be able to show...
Categories: Open Source

Building a hamster fitness tracker using Dynatrace API

Hamsters are nocturnal rodents and, therefore, are mostly active during the night. My boyfriend and I do have a hamster, and curiosity led us to start thinking about how we could track some of his activities, specifically how far he is able to run within a night. So we decided to turn the hamster wheel into a fitness tracker using the Dynatrace API. Basically, we wanted to capture all the rotations of it. And, there was not much additional “hardware” needed for this goal to be achieved.

We already had the hamster…

…and the hamster wheel.

Required hardware:

  • Hamster
  • Hamster wheel – with a large enough diameter eg “Silent Runner” ~30cm
  • Microcontroller with an integrated wifi chip (ESP8266) – eg a NodeMCU
  • Infrared obstacle avoidance sensor – eg KY-032
  • Small reflector stripe (eg aluminum foil)

Software setup:

  • MQTT broker – eg Mosquitto
  • Node-Red
  • Dynatrace SaaS
Modifying the hamster wheel

It was mandatory that we do not install any wires inside the terrarium. All wires had to be installed on the outside only, out of the hamster’s reach. We decided to use an infrared obstacle avoidance sensor — sensitive to light reflections — which could be placed on top of the terrarium. Next we applied an aluminum foil reflector stripe to the wheel.

 

Implementing the fitness tracker

The simplest way for us to process the sensor’s data was using a micro controller with an integrated wifi-chip. As a start we wanted to capture some metrics per rotation and some lap and night summary statistics like speed and distance. For all of these metrics we registered a custom time series identifier via the Dynatrace API and, additionally, the hamster wheel was registered as a custom device.

The microcontroller was programmed to calculate and send all the needed metrics to an MQTT broker used as a sort of relay station. MQTT is an extremely lightweight messaging protocol for devices with limited processing power and/or network bandwidth – thus, a perfect fit for us. As the Dynatrace API expects the metrics in JSON format we needed to add some conversion of the sensor’s raw data. This could easily be achieved by implementing a Node-RED flow.

Our flow subscribes to the MQTT broker filtering the incoming wheel’s sensor data. The data is then enriched with the current time stamp and converted to a JSON payload which is sent via HTTP to the Dynatrace REST API.

Fitness Results

I created a custom dashboard showing all the different hamster wheel’s metrics.

It turned out that our hamster is very busy every night. Usually he runs about 5 to 7 kilometers with an average speed of 3 kilometers per hour. So far his personal record was a total distance of roughly 8.5 kilometers per night which equal to approximately 8,900 rotations. He always runs several laps — mostly about 50 to 150 — whereby a lap’s distance adds up to 0.1 to 0.9 kilometers.

Here are the charts showing our hamster’s current “high scores”:

The night run’s total distance…

The total distance of a night's run -- constantly increasing to a total of ~8.5 km within a time of roughly 4 hours.The total distance of a night’s run — constantly increasing to a total of ~8.5 km within a time of roughly 4 hours.

…and total number of rotations.

The total number of rotations for a night's run -- constantly increasing to a total of ~9,000 rotations within a time of roughly 4 hoursThe total number of rotations for a night’s run — constantly increasing to a total of ~9,000 rotations within a time of roughly 4 hours

As well as the average distances per lap…

A night's run always consists of several laps, whereby a single one usually adds up to 0.1 to 0.9 kilometers.A night’s run always consists of several laps, whereby a single one usually adds up to 0.1 to 0.9 kilometers.

And, of course, speed!

Typically, the average speed is around 3 kilometers per hour -- sometimes also a bit higher.Typically, the average speed is around 3 kilometers per hour — sometimes also a bit higher. Conclusion

We learned that the reason our hamster sleeps so much during the day is because he is exhausted from his nighttime workouts! 8.5 kilometers — or a little more than 5 miles — is a significant run for a human! But for such a tiny creature which such short legs, 5 miles is a major accomplishment. We can’t wait to see if he takes a recovery day (or night) like most runners do! In the meantime his terrarium will continue to be located in another room far from the bedroom!

He also gets an incredible amount of mileage for the relatively small amount of fuel he consumes. He’s a very efficient little creature!

However, the primary reason I embarked on this project is to demonstrate, in a humorous way, the versatility of our APM solution for nearly any application you can imagine — large, small, or somewhere in between.

Also, I wanted to show you, the reader, a little bit of the Dynatrace culture and how our commitment to providing the best possible APM solution extends well beyond our workday. I hope you found this posting to be entertaining and informative.

The post Building a hamster fitness tracker using Dynatrace API appeared first on Dynatrace blog – monitoring redefined.

Categories: Companies

Cambridge Lean Coffee

Hiccupps - James Thomas - Wed, 04/26/2017 - 22:11

This month's Lean Coffee was hosted by DisplayLink. Here's some brief, aggregated comments and questions  on topics covered by the group I was in.

How to spread knowledge between testers in different teams, and how often should people rotate between teams?
  • How to know what is the right length of time for someone to spend in a team?
  • When is someone ready to move on?
  • How do you trade off e.g. good team spirit against overspecialisation?
  • When should you push someone out of their comfort zone, show them how much they don't know?
  • Fortnightly test team meetings playing videos of conference talks.
  • Secondment to other teams.
  • Lean Coffee for the test team.
  • Daily team standup, pairing, weekly presentations, ad hoc sharing sessions after standup.
  • Is there a desire to share?
  • Yes. Well, they all want to know more about what the others do.
  • People don't want to be doing the same thing all the time.
  • Could you rotate the work in the team rather than rotate people out of the team?
  • It might be harder to do in scenarios where each team is very different, e.g. in terms of technologies being tested.
  • There are side-effects on the team too.
  • There can't be a particular standard period of time after which a switch is made - the team, person, project etc must be taken into account too.
  • Can you rotate junior testers around teams to gain breadth of experience?

What piece of testing wisdom would you give to a new tester?
  • Be aware of communities of practice. Lots of people have been doing this for years.
  • ... for over 50 years, in fact, and a lot of what the early testers were doing is still relevant today.
  • There is value in not knowing - because you can ask questions no-one else is asking.
  • Always trust your instinct and gut when you're trying to explore a new feature or an area.
  • Learn to deal with complexity, uncertainty and ambiguity. You need to be able to operate in spite of them.
  • Learn about people. You will be working with them.
  • ... and don't forget that you are a person too.
  • Use the knowledge of the experienced testers around you. Ask questions. Ask again.
  • Make a list of what could be tested, and how much each item matters to relevant stakeholders.
  • Pick skills and practice them.

Where you look from changes what you see.
  • I was testing a server (using an unfamiliar technology) from a client machine and got a result I wasn't sure was reasonable.
  • ... after a while I switched to another client and got a different result.
  • Would a deeper technical understanding have helped?
  • Probably. In analogous cases where I have expertise I can more easily think about what factors are likely to be important and what kinds of scenarios I might consider.
  • Try to question everything that you see: am I sure? How could I disprove this?
  • Ask what assumptions are being made.
  • What you look at changes what you see: we had an issue which wasn't repeatable with what looked like a relevant export from the database, only with the whole database.
  • Part of the skill of testing is finding comparison points.
  • Can you take an expert's perspective, e.g. by co-opting an expert.

Using mindmaps well for large groups of test cases.
  • With such a large mindmap I can't see the whole thing at once.
  • Do you want to see the whole thing at once?
  • I want to organised mindmaps so that I can expand sub-trees independently because they aren't overly related.
  • Is wanting to see everything a smell? Perhaps that the structure isn't right?
  • Perhaps it's revealing an unwarranted degree of complexity in the product.
  • Or in your thinking.
  • A mindmap is your mindmap. It should exist to support you.
  • What are you trying to visualise?
  • Could you make it bigger?
  • Who is the audience?
  • I don't like to use a mindmap to keep track of project progress (e.g. with status).
  • I like a mindmap to get thoughts down
  • I use a mindmap to keep track of software dependencies.
Image: https://flic.kr/p/iv7P
Categories: Blogs

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