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Fix: Error occurred during a cryptographic operation.

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago

Have you ever had this error while switching between projects using the Identity authentication?

Are you still wondering what it is and why it happens?

Clear your cookies. The FedAuth cookie is encrypted using the defined machine key in your web.config. If there is none defined in your web.config, it will use a common one. If the key used to encrypt isn't the same used to decrypt?

Boom goes the dynamite.

Categories: Blogs

Renewed MVP ASP.NET/IIS 2015

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago

Well there it goes again. It was just confirmed that I am renewed as an MVP for the next 12 months.

Becoming an MVP is not an easy task. Offline conferences, blogs, Twitter, helping manage a user group. All of this is done in my free time and it requires a lot of time.But I'm so glad to be part of the big MVP family once again!

Thanks to all of you who interacted with me last year, let's do it again this year!

Categories: Blogs

Failed to delete web hosting plan Default: Server farm 'Default' cannot be deleted because it has sites assigned to it

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago

So I had this issue where I was moving web apps between hosting plans. As they were all transferred, I wondered why it refused to delete them with this error message.

After a few click left and right and a lot of wasted time, I found this blog post that provides a script to help you debug and the exact explanation as to why it doesn't work.

To make things quick, it's all about "Deployment Slots". Among other things, they have their own serverFarm setting and they will not change when you change their parents in Powershell (haven't tried by the portal).

Here's a copy of the script from Harikharan Krishnaraju for future references:

Switch-AzureMode AzureResourceManager
$Resource = Get-AzureResource

foreach ($item in $Resource)
{
	if ($item.ResourceType -Match "Microsoft.Web/sites/slots")
	{
		$plan=(Get-AzureResource -Name $item.Name -ResourceGroupName $item.ResourceGroupName -ResourceType $item.ResourceType -ParentResource $item.ParentResource -ApiVersion 2014-04-01).Properties.webHostingPlan;
		write-host "WebHostingPlan " $plan " under site " $item.ParentResource " for deployment slot " $item.Name ;
	}

	elseif ($item.ResourceType -Match "Microsoft.Web/sites")
	{
		$plan=(Get-AzureResource -Name $item.Name -ResourceGroupName $item.ResourceGroupName -ResourceType $item.ResourceType -ApiVersion 2014-04-01).Properties.webHostingPlan;
		write-host "WebHostingPlan " $plan " under site " $item.Name ;
	}
}
      
    
Categories: Blogs

Switching Azure Web Apps from one App Service Plan to another

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago

So I had to do some change to App Service Plan for one of my client. The first thing I was looking for was to do it under the portal. A few clicks and I'm done!

But before I get into why I need to move one of them, I'll need to tell you about why I needed to move 20 of them.

Consolidating the farm

First, my client had a lot of WebApps deployed left and right in different "Default" ServicePlan. Most were created automatically by scripts or even Visual Studio. Each had different instance size and difference scaling capabilities.

We needed a way to standardize how we scale and especially the size on which we deployed. So we came down with a list of different hosting plans that we needed, the list of apps that would need to be moved and on which hosting plan they currently were.

That list went to 20 web apps to move. The portal wasn't going to cut it. It was time to bring in the big guns.

Powershell

Powershell is the Command Line for Windows. It's powered by awesomeness and cats riding unicorns. It allows you to do thing like remote control Azure, import/export CSV files and so much more.

CSV and Azure is what I needed. Since we built a list of web apps to migrate in Excel, CSV was the way to go.

The Code or rather, The Script

What follows is what is being used. It's heavily inspired of what was found online.

My CSV file has 3 columns: App, ServicePlanSource and ServicePlanDestination. Only two are used for the actual command. I could have made this command more generic but since I was working with apps in EastUS only, well... I didn't need more.

This script should be considered as "Works on my machine". Haven't tested all the edge cases.

Param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$True)]
    [string]$filename
)

Switch-AzureMode AzureResourceManager
$rgn = 'Default-Web-EastUS'

$allAppsToMigrate = Import-Csv $filename
foreach($app in $allAppsToMigrate)
{
    if($app.ServicePlanSource -ne $app.ServicePlanDestination)
    {
        $appName = $app.App
		    $source = $app.ServicePlanSource
		    $dest = $app.ServicePlanDestination
        $res = Get-AzureResource -Name $appName -ResourceGroupName $rgn -ResourceType Microsoft.Web/sites -ApiVersion 2014-04-01
        $prop = @{ 'serverFarm' = $dest}
        $res = Set-AzureResource -Name $appName -ResourceGroupName $rgn -ResourceType Microsoft.Web/sites -ApiVersion 2014-04-01 -PropertyObject $prop
        Write-Host "Moved $appName from $source to $dest"
    }
}
    
Categories: Blogs

Microsoft Virtual Academy Links for 2014

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago

So I thought that going through a few Microsoft Virtual Academy links could help some of you.

Here are the links I think deserve at least a click. If you find them interesting, let me know!

Categories: Blogs

Temporarily ignore SSL certificate problem in Git under Windows

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago

So I've encountered the following issue:

fatal: unable to access 'https://myurl/myproject.git/': SSL certificate problem: unable to get local issuer certificate

Basically, we're working on a local Git Stash project and the certificates changed. While they were working to fix the issues, we had to keep working.

So I know that the server is not compromised (I talked to IT). How do I say "ignore it please"?

Temporary solution

This is because you know they are going to fix it.

PowerShell code:

$env:GIT_SSL_NO_VERIFY = "true"

CMD code:

SET GIT_SSL_NO_VERIFY=true

This will get you up and running as long as you don’t close the command window. This variable will be reset to nothing as soon as you close it.

Permanent solution

Fix your certificates. Oh… you mean it’s self signed and you will forever use that one? Install it on all machines.

Seriously. I won’t show you how to permanently ignore certificates. Fix your certificate situation because trusting ALL certificates without caring if they are valid or not is juts plain dangerous.

Fix it.

NOW.

Categories: Blogs

The Yoda Condition

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago

So this will be a short post. I would like to introduce a word in my vocabulary and yours too if it didn't already exist.

First I would like to credit Nathan Smith for teaching me that word this morning. First, the tweet:

Chuckling at "disallowYodaConditions" in JSCS… https://t.co/unhgFdMCrh — Awesome way of describing it. pic.twitter.com/KDPxpdB3UE

— Nathan Smith (@nathansmith) November 12, 2014

So... this made me chuckle.

What is the Yoda Condition?

The Yoda Condition can be summarized into "inverting the parameters compared in a conditional".

Let's say I have this code:

string sky = "blue";if(sky == "blue) {    // do something}

It can be read easily as "If the sky is blue". Now let's put some Yoda into it!

Our code becomes :

string sky = "blue";	if("blue" == sky){    // do something}

Now our code read as "If blue is the sky". And that's why we call it Yoda condition.

Why would I do that?

First, if you're missing an "=" in your code, it will fail at compile time since you can't assign a variable to a literal string. It can also avoid certain null reference error.

What's the cost of doing this then?

Beside getting on the nerves of all the programmers in your team? You reduce the readability of your code by a huge factor.

Each developer on your team will hit a snag on every if since they will have to learn how to speak "Yoda" with your code.

So what should I do?

Avoid it. At all cost. Readability is the most important thing in your code. To be honest, you're not going to be the only guy/girl maintaining that app for years to come. Make it easy for the maintainer and remove that Yoda talk.

The problem this kind of code solve isn't worth the readability you are losing.

Categories: Blogs

Do you have your own Batman Utility Belt?

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago
Just like most of us on any project, you (yes you!) as a developer must have done the same thing over and over again. I'm not talking about coding a controller or accessing the database.

Let's check out some concrete examples shall we?

  • Have you ever setup HTTP Caching properly, created a class for your project and call it done?
  • What about creating a proper Web.config to configure static asset caching?
  • And what about creating a MediaTypeFormatter for handling CSV or some other custom type?
  • What about that BaseController that you rebuild from project to project?
  • And those extension methods that you use ALL the time but rebuild for each projects...

If you answered yes to any of those questions... you are in great risk of having to code those again.

Hell... maybe someone already built them out there. But more often than not, they will be packed with other classes that you are not using. However, most of those projects are open source and will allow you to build your own Batman utility belt!

So once you see that you do something often, start building your utility belt! Grab those open source classes left and right (make sure to follow the licenses!) and start building your own class library.

NuGet

Once you have a good collection that is properly separated in a project and that you seem ready to kick some monkey ass, the only way to go is to use NuGet to pack it together!

Checkout the reference to make sure that you do things properly.

NuGet - Publishing

OK you got a steamy new hot NuGet package that you are ready to use? You can either push it to the main repository if your intention is to share it with the world.

If you are not ready quite yet, there are multiple way to use a NuGet package internally in your company. The easiest? Just create a Share on a server and add it to your package source! As simple as that!

Now just make sure to increment your version number on each release by using the SemVer convention.

Reap the profit

OK, no... not really. You probably won't be money anytime soon with this library. At least not in real money. Where you will gain however is when you are asked to do one of those boring task yet over again in another project or at another client.

The only thing you'll do is import your magic package, use it and boom. This task that they planned would take a whole day? Got finished in minutes.

As you build up your toolkit, more and more task will become easier to accomplish.

The only thing left to consider is what NOT to put in your toolkit.

Last minute warning

If you have an employer, make sure that your contract allows you to reuse code. Some contracts allows you to do that but double check with your employer.

If you are a company, make sure not to bill your client for the time spent building your tool or he might have the right to claim them as his own since you billed him for it.

In case of doubt, double check with a lawyer!

Categories: Blogs

Software Developer Computer Minimum Requirements October 2014

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago

I know that Scott Hanselman and Jeff Atwood have already done something similar.

Today, I'm bringing you the minimum specs that are required to do software development on a Windows Machine.

P.S.: If you are building your own desktop, I recommend PCPartPicker.

ProcessorRecommendation

Intel: Intel Core i7-4790K

AMD: AMD FX-9590

Unless you use a lot of software that supports multi-threading, a simple 4 core here will work out for most needs.

MemoryRecommendation

Minimum 8GB. 16GB is better.

My minimum requirement here is 8GB. I run a database engine and Visual Studio. SQL Server can easily take 2Gb with some big queries. If you have extensions installed for Visual Studio, it will quickly raise to 1GB of usage per instance and finally... Chrome. With multiple extensions and multiple pages running... you will quickly reach 4GB.

So get 8GB as the bare minimum. If you are running Virtual Machines, get 16GB. It won't be too much. There's no such thing as too much RAM when doing software development.

Hard-driveRecommendation

512 GB SSD drive

I can't recommend enough an SSD. Most tools that you use on a development machine will require a lot of I/O. Especially random read. When a compiler starts and retrieve all your source code to compile, it will need to read from all those file. Same thing if you have tooling like ReSharper or CodeRush. I/O speed is crucial. This requirement is even more important on a laptop. Traditionally, PC maker put a 5200RPM HDD on a laptop to reduce power usage. However, 5200 RPM while doing development will be felt everywhere.

Get an SSD.

If you need bigger storage (terabytes), you can always get a second hard-drive of the HDD type instead. Slower but capacities are also higher. On most laptop, you will need external storage for this hard drive so make sure it is USB3 compatible.

Graphic Card

Unless you do graphic rendering or are working with graphic tools that require a beast of a card... this is where you will put the less amount of money.

Make sure to get enough of them for your amount of monitors and that they can provide the right resolution/refresh rate.

Monitors

My minimum requirement nowadays is 22 inches. 4K is nice but is not part of the "minimum" requirement. I enjoy a 1920x1080 resolution. If you are buying them for someone else, make sure they can be rotated. Some developers like to have a vertical screen when reading code.

To Laptop or not to Laptop

Some company go Laptop for everyone. Personally, if the development machine never need to be taken out of the building, you can go desktop. You will save a bit on all the required accessories (docking port, wireless mouse, extra charger, etc.).

My personal scenario takes me to clients all over the city as well as doing presentations left and right. Laptop it is for me.

Categories: Blogs

SVG are now supported everywhere, or almost

Decaying Code - Maxime Rouiller - 4 hours 34 min ago

I remember that when I wanted to draw some graphs on a web page, I would normally have 2 solutions

Solution 1 was to have an IMG tag that linked to a server component that would render an image based on some data. Solution 2 was to do Adobe Flash or maybe even some Silverlight.

Problem with Solution 1

The main problem is that it is not interactive. You have an image and there is no way to do drilldown or do anything with it. So unless your content was simple and didn't need any kind of interaction or simply was headed for printing... this solution just wouldn't do.

Problem with Solution 2

While you now get all the interactivity and the beauty of a nice Flash animation and plugin... you lost the benefits of the first solution too. Can't print it if you need it and over that... it required a plugin.

For OSX back in 2009, plugins were the leading cause of browser crash and there is nothing that stops us from believing that similar things aren't true for other browsers.

The second problem is security. A plugin is just another attack vector on your browser and requiring a plugin to display nice graphs seem a bit extreme.

The Solution

The solution is relatively simple. We need a system that allows us to draw lines, curves and what not based on coordinate that we provide it.

That system should of course support colors, font and all the basic HTML features that we know now (including events).

Then came SVG

SVG has been the main specification to drawing anything vector related in a browser since 1999. Even though the specification started at the same time than IE5, it wasn't supported in Internet Explorer until IE9 (12 years later).

The support for SVG is now in all major browsers from Internet Explorer to FireFox and even in your phone.

Chances are that every computer you are using today can render SVG inside your browser.

So what?

SVG as a general rule is under used or thought of something only artists do or that it's too complicated to do.

My recommendation is to start cracking today on using libraries that leverage SVG. By leveraging them, you are setting yourself apart from others and can start offering real business value to your clients right now that others won't be able to.

SVG has been available on all browsers for a while now. It's time we start using it.

Browsers that do not support SVG
  • Internet Explorer 8 and lower
  • Old Android device (2.3 and less), partial support for 3-4.3
References, libraries and others
Categories: Blogs

.NET Innovators

As a community, we are constantly looking for ways to redefine ourselves and improve our products as a whole. Today’s two .NET innovators are helping find those improvements everyday – from building code to teaching and mentoring the future .NET innovators. Let’s celebrate these two .NET rockstars!

Rodrigo Pinto

ncover_mvp_rodrigo_pinto_twitterRodrigo Pinto loves the idea of developing new solutions for and by the .NET community – how can we not celebrate that mindset? With 15 years of experience in software engineering and architecture, Rodrigo is the SharePoint Architect at Everis. He also specializes in PowerShell, Visual Studio ALM, and .NET.

Rodrigo was first recognized as SharePoint MVP in 2011 and has traveled the world training and sharing his expertise at various conferences and speaking engagements. He is always taking on new challenges. Follow along on his .NET adventures on twitter @ScoutmanPT.

Damir Arh

ncover_mvp_damir_arh_twitterDamir has many years of experience with the development and maintenance of complex software solutions for document management. Currently he works as a software architect and is exploring how the latest technologies can be used to improve the development process to better meet user requirements in insurance and banking software.

Damir has been recognized as a .NET MVP since 2012 and also specializes in ASP.NET/IIS, Windows Platform Development, and Visual Studio ALM. He likes to connect with others in the software solutions community through his blog and talks at local conferences and user groups. Follow Damir on twitter @damirarh.

The post .NET Innovators appeared first on NCover.

Categories: Companies

Execute the TestComplete TestExecute module remotely on a VM using PSExec

Using the SysInternals tool PSExec.exe to launch TestExecute and run a project on a VM.

  1. Login to VM as normal user
  2. Run PSExec from command line (or batch file) on local machine.  I was having trouble with this; needs to be username not in quotes and password in double quotes.
C:\SysInternals\PSTools\PsExec.exe \\TESTVM -u domain\user -p "P@$$w0rd" -i \\TESTVM\C$\Users\testaccount\Downloads\TestExecuteRemote.bat
  1. User launching PSExec.exe is the same user logged in to the VM (without admin rights)
  2. -i option executes interactive
  3. TestExecuteRemote.bat contains command line to call TestExecute that looks like this:
:: Run TestExecute and export log to c:\LOG\ExportLog.mht:: Log file cannot exist or test will fail to run:: Test account needs write permission to the project folder (log is also generated under project)"\\TESTVM\C$\Program Files (x86)\SmartBear\TestExecute 10\Bin\TestExecute.exe" \\TESTVM\C$\Test\ProjectSuite1\ProjectSuite1.pjs /r /e /DoNotShowLog /ExportLog:\\TESTVM\C$\LOG\ExportLog.mht

PSExec.exe has an option for -l to run as limited user, but the remote batch file failed to run using that option. 
Categories: Blogs

JIRA migration this weekend

In continuing my infra upgrade work, this weekend I'll be migrating JIRA to another server.

This will make upgrade more manageable and testable. The service will be disrupted for a few hours. Check out our @jenkinsci on Twitter for up-to-the-minute status.

Once the migration is done, the next step is to upgrade them.

Categories: Open Source

Maybe CD Summit And Jenkins Could Have Saved The Phoenix Project?

Gene Kim, authorBy now, most everyone in the information technology (IT) business has probably read or heard about the seminal book, The Phoenix Project, by Gene Kim, Kevin Behr and George Spafford. If you haven’t read it, put it on your Kindle right now and get started. The Phoenix Project is a great novel about IT that is both engaging and enlightening. As we watch our hero, Bill, transform his IT organization from a broken and dysfunctional siloed mess to a modern, efficient and productive software and solution factory, we learn (painfully) about many of the challenges that face real-world IT organizations today. In fact these challenges actually impact more than just IT - they also impact the business. The Phoenix Project tells the powerful story of how one organization implemented continuous delivery in their DevOps transformation.

The book starts with the promotion of Bill Palmer from Director of Midrange Operations to VP of IT Operations (albeit a somewhat reluctant promotion on Bills part).  Bill quickly discovers that his newly inherited world of IT Operations is a bit of a disaster.  The first part of the book describes in painstaking detail, the various issues Bill faces: production failures, too many audit findings, technical debt, organizations at each others’ throats, and fragile artifacts and systems.  And on top of all of this, Bill is tasked with launching their next generation “bet the business” platform for ecommerce and point of sale systems, the Phoenix Project, which is already behind schedule and at risk.

The fun starts when Bill meets Erik, the mysteriously wisened “Obi Wan Kenobi”-like character that helps Bill find his way from chaos to DevOps nirvana.  Erik leads Bill through a transformation via a number of breakthroughs that improve how the IT organization runs.  They identify many of the root causes of the challenges they face such as:

  • The volume of the Work In Progress (WIP) that is bottlenecked and where (or who) those bottlenecks are (and how reducing the work going to the bottleneck can help).
  • The amount of unplanned work that impacts their operations (and how planned preventative work can help).
  • The lack of real understanding of how the work flows and what the handoffs are (and how proper documentation, planning and Kanban boards can help here).
  • The impact of audit and infosec requirements (and how correctly scoping these can REALLY help).
  • The real amount of manual labor involved in every aspect of their operations (and how automation technologies can be super helpful here).

Erik gradually leads Bill to the vision of continuous delivery and how leveraging automation in the application development and delivery lifecycle can resolve a number of these issues by optimizing the flow of WIP, insuring application quality at each stage of the journey, and by guaranteeing that the environments and applications are the same across the stages of the lifecycle.  Here’s how Erik puts it:

“Your next step should be obvious by now, grasshopper. In order for you to keep up with customer demand, which includes your upstream comrades in Development,” he says, “you need to create what Humble and Farley called a deployment pipeline. That’s your entire value stream from code check-in to production. That’s not an art. That’s production. You need to get everything in version control. Everything. Not just the code, but everything required to build the environment. Then you need to automate the entire environment creation process. You need a deployment pipeline where you can create test and production environments, and then deploy code into them, entirely on-demand. That’s how you reduce your setup times and eliminate errors, so you can finally match whatever rate of change Development sets the tempo at.”1

Erik is describing continuous delivery which is the application lifecycle management approach that is rapidly taking hold across industries.  And interestingly, there are technologies out there today that are specifically designed to help you implement continuous delivery.  Jenkins, the industry’s most popular continuous integration server is now being extended beyond the build and test stages to orchestrate full continuous delivery process. The Jenkins Workflow capability allows DevOps practitioners to create full Deployment Pipelines just as Erik describes.  If the Phoenix project had leveraged Jenkins for continuous delivery from day one, then the project would have surely been more successful, but it would also mean that this book would have been much less interesting!  As mentioned above, The Phoenix Project is a great read and should be required reading for all of us in this industry.



If you would like to learn more about how you can apply continuous delivery (CD) in your world (perhaps to ensure that no one writes a book about your software delivery disasters), come to the CD Summit World Tour this summer. In fact, Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project, will be a keynote speaker at the Washington DC and San Francisco events so bring your own copy of The Phoenix Project and have it autographed!




1) Kim, Gene; Behr, Kevin ; Spafford, George (2013-01-10). The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win (Kindle Locations 4373-4378). IT Revolution Press. Kindle Edition.







Dan Juengst

Senior Director, Product Marketing
CloudBees, Inc.
Follow Dan on Twitter: @DanJuengst
Categories: Companies

Testing to Break: Tesla Model X Testing Autopilot

uTest - 17 hours 35 min ago

2014-tesla-model-x-3-429-photo-441419-s-originalThe 2014 SyScan conference already ushered in a new era of testing by offering a $10,000 bounty for any tester who was able to remotely access a Tesla Model S’ automobile operating system.

This latest Tesla testing escapade makes that one seem like child’s play.

According to Gas2, as the Tesla Model X nears its debut, a “spy video shows a test driver purposely trying to crash a Model X test mule, no doubt putting the next-gen Autopilot system through its paces.”

The online publication also recently reported that the autopilot software for the Model S was also tested by Tesla — software that would allow that car to drive itself from San Francisco to Seattle almost entirely hands-free.

Although self-driving cars are becoming all the rage, at this early juncture with the autopilot Teslas and self-driving Google cars of the world, I’d recommend testers ‘test to break’ on their mobile devices for now…and not in an autopiloted Tesla.

Not a uTester yet? Sign up today to comment on all of our blogs, and gain access to free training, the latest software testing news, opportunities to work on paid testing projects, and networking with over 175,000 testing pros. Join now.

The post Testing to Break: Tesla Model X Testing Autopilot appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Announcing QA Wizard Pro 2015.1

The Seapine View - 18 hours 46 min ago

We’re happy to announce QA Wizard Pro 2015.1. This upgrade includes several new features and statements along with enhancements and bug fixes. A detailed list of the changes can be found in the release notes.

Here is a short list of the new features:

  • Specify data sources for called and remote scripts
  • Pass more parameters to .NET properties
  • Perform actions with the new GetVariableValues, FirstRow, LastRow, and DecryptString statements
  • Support for Mozilla Firefox 36 and 37, and Google Chrome 41

Take a look at all the new features in the QA Wizard Pro What’s New help.

Don’t have QA Wizard Pro 2015.1 yet?

Upgrades are free if you have a current QA Wizard Pro support and maintenance plan. If you’re not already using QA Wizard Pro, try it out today.

The post Announcing QA Wizard Pro 2015.1 appeared first on Blog.

Categories: Companies

Video: Jason Huggins – Fixing HealthCare.gov, One Test at a Time

Sauce Labs - Thu, 04/23/2015 - 23:38

This week, Sauce Labs co-founder and Selenium creator Jason Huggins came to visit to chat about his leave of absence to help fix HealthCare.gov.  For those who missed his talk at the Selenium meetup, we’re happy to report that we got our hands on a recording.  Check out the video below to watch.

ABSTRACT

In late 2013, Selenium creator Jason Huggins joined President Obama’s “tech surge” team to help fix HealthCare.gov. In D.C. during the height of the crisis in November and December 2013, Jason had a behind-the-scenes view into a unique period in American history when a website’s quality (or lack thereof) had the attention of the nation, the press, the President, and Congress.

In this talk, Jason will share some of his stories from the HealthCare.gov turnaround and the “HealthCare 2.0″ effort in mid-2014. Jason will talk about the newly created U.S. Digital Services and how it was created out of the original HealthCare.gov crisis. He’ll also cover the U.S. Digital Services Playbook and what the role of automated testing and deployment will be in future U.S. Government projects.

Lastly, Jason will talk about opportunites for how Silicon Valley can help government build effective digital services in the future.

BIO

Jason is a software engineer living in Chicago. He started the Selenium project in 2004 at ThoughtWorks. He later joined Google to work on large-scale web testing for Gmail, Google Maps, and other teams. He left Google to co-found Sauce Labs as CTO to create a cloud-based Selenium service. In late 2013, Jason took leave from Sauce to help with the HealthCare.gov turnaround. He is also the creator of Tapster, a mobile app testing robot that’s been featured in Popular Science, Wired,Tech Crunch, and the MIT Technology Review.

Categories: Companies

STAREAST, Orlando, Florida, May 3-8 2015

Software Testing Magazine - Thu, 04/23/2015 - 17:50
STAREAST is a conference for software testers and quality assurance professionals. It presents up-to-date information, tools, and technologies available in the software testing domain today. You will be able to attend conference presentations and half- or full-day tutorials. In the agenda of STAREAST you can find topics like “The Challenges of BIG Testing: Automation, Virtualization, Outsourcing, and More”, “A Rapid Introduction to Rapid Software Testing”, “Measurement and Metrics for Test Managers”, “Applying Emotional Intelligence to Testing”, “Application Performance Testing: A Simplified Universal Approach”, “Selenium Test Automation: From the Ground Up”, “Common ...
Categories: Communities

SOASTA and Kony Partner on Mobile Devops

Software Testing Magazine - Thu, 04/23/2015 - 17:29
Kony and SOASTA have announced a partnership that combines both companies’ capabilities to optimize the performance of enterprise mobile apps across the mobile application development lifecycle. Through this partnership, Kony and SOASTA will work together to integrate their technologies and combine their expertise to deliver a comprehensive, integrated mobile solution across the DevOps lifecycle for customers. As a result, from prototype to production, mobile apps built on the Kony Mobility Platform can be tested, monitored, measured, analyzed and optimized for peak performance with SOASTA’s TouchTest, CloudTest and mPulse solutions for an ...
Categories: Communities

uTest Tester Platform: TTL and App Updates for April 23, 2015

uTest - Thu, 04/23/2015 - 17:18

uTest Test Team Leads (TTLs) provide an invaluable service to Applause Project Managers (PMs) and customers. As such, it is important we ensure that TTLs are able to conduct their work in an efficient and effective way. This week’s Platform Updates are focused around TTL workflows and productivity enablement.

TTL: Mandatory value tier suggestions and rejection reasons

Part of the TTL’s role is to minimize overhead for Applause customers. This is especially true when performing bug triage. Previously, TTLs with Basic privileges could only suggest value tiers and rejection reasons when setting bugs to ‘Pending.’

Going forward, value tier suggestions and rejection reasons will be mandatory fields for TTLs to complete when triaging bugs. However, the default selection for value tier is “somewhat.”

In addition to these being mandatory fields, the Platform will now highlight the matching approval option in the approval dropdown on bug details for PMs and customers with a hint — “TTL suggestion.” While the customer remains in control and has the final decision to value tester findings, TTL recommendations will greatly increase visibility for customers:

2015-04-15_2214

Similarly, there will now be a preselected rejection reason for ‘Pending Rejection’ bugs where TTLs recommended a rejection reason:

2015-04-15_2214

We hope that making these changes to the way issues are triaged will improve fairness for all testers.

TTL: Customizable CSV export for bug lists

Oftentimes TTLs will need to export bugs from the uTest Platform. Going forward, TTLs will now have customizable CSV Exports. By letting the user choose which columns to export, it will reduce the need for manual cleanup of bug data:

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TTL: Customizable Bug Tracking System export

In order to increase the value of bug reports exported to customers via a Bug Tracking System (BTS), we have created a predefined set of a few templates for exports that customers and PMs can select so that TTLs do not have to manually clean up bug reports that contain details customers don’t need.

This will allow them to choose which information would be part of the exported bug reports based on a few predefined templates. It’s as simple as selecting the option “minimal” from the dropdown on the BTS, and you no longer have a verbose export:

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Please note, this feature is only accessible to PMs/ETTLs at this point to avoid customers misconfiguring things. As soon as we remove any potential issues with this feature, we will make this more widely available to TMs/TTLPs as well.

Tester app: Add per-test cycle earnings to test cycle list

When a tester views the test cycle screen, they will now see total earnings per test cycle. This includes bugs, bonuses, test cases and reviews.

Be sure to stop by the Forums and let us know your thoughts on these updates!

The post uTest Tester Platform: TTL and App Updates for April 23, 2015 appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

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