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JUC World Tour 2015 - Keynote Speaker News and Early Bird Tickets

The 2015 JUC World Tour dates are rapidly approaching. Since the community has grown so tremendously since last year, the JUC in each city will be the largest gathering of Jenkins users in that region.

Kohsuke will, as always, be the opening keynote speaker at each JUC. But, with the conference going from one to two days, I am happy to announce that Gene Kim will be another keynote on the second day! He is the author of The Phoenix Project and a thought leader in DevOps.

To have these two experts in one place will provide a great opportunity to talk about Jenkins as the foundation of continuous delivery and DevOps practices.

Another exciting announcement: the 2015 Jenkins World Tour will run alongside the CD Summit conferences for both days (at the U.S. East, Europe and U.S. West locations only). Attendees of either conference can attend any of the talks and presentations at both events. Learn more about what CD Summit 2014 was like to get an idea for this year's event.

Registration for all 2015 JUC locations is open. Early bird pricing ends May 1!

The Call for Papers for JUC is still open for Israel and U.S. West. Submit your own proposal or convince your favorite speaker/Jenkins user to submit one if speaking is not your thing!

Categories: Open Source

SonarQube User Conference – U.S. West (Santa Clara, CA)

Sonar - Wed, 04/08/2015 - 22:01

We are very happy to announce that the second SonarQube user conference will take place on April 27th at the Santa Clara Convention Center, in Santa Clara, California.

Following our East Coast tour in October of last year and the good feedback we received from it, we have decided to host another event, this time on the West Coast. This time the format will be slightly different, with two distinct sessions:

  1. An executive session in the morning covering major topics on our roadmap, as well as strategy, adoption, and results. This session is reserved to our customers.
  2. A more technical session in the afternoon, during which we will demonstrate the latest features, such as new integrations with Visual Studio and TFS, new bug detection features, issue filtering through Elastic Search… We will also discuss the challenges and future state of the SonarQube platform and Continuous Inspection as a practice.

We believe this is a unique chance for us to meet our users, and for you to provide feedback on the product and to hear where we are going, so we hope you’ll be able to join us.

There is still time to register but don’t wait too long; the seats are filling up fast! To reserve your seat, simply send an email to kristi.karu At sonarsource.com.

And if you can’t make it to California this spring, don’t worry. We’re planning a similar event this fall in Europe. Stay tuned for more details.

Categories: Open Source

Confluence migration this weekend

For the past few weeks, I've burnt a lot of midnight oil to get Confluence containerized. The goal is to make Confluence upgrade more manageable and testable. In the proces, I've not only containerized Confluence, but also containerized some other services, including mock LDAP server, to be able to test the copy of the production Confluence dataset against newer versions of Confluence before upgrading production.

The infra team is currently targeting this weekend to migrate our current Confluence instance to this new container, and use the opportunity to move the service to a bigger system. Currently JIRA and Confluence has to live within 2.5GB RAM from the same host, and it's really stretching both services. The new box has 4GB of RAM, and we are splitting JIRA and Confluence to two different servers. So there's a lot of head room.

So please expect some Wiki outage over the next weekend.

As always, our sincere thank you to Oregon State University Open Source Lab for generously hosting our servers. Please donate to them to show your support. Similarly, thank you Atlassian for generously providing the license for running Confluence.

If this goes well, JIRA will follow suit.

Categories: Open Source

Good bye Java6

About two years ago, we bumped our runtime JRE requirement from Java5 to Java6. And so the time has come once again for us to finally move on to Java7. Because of all the new language features, many of us the developers really wanted to move right on to Java8, but after much discussion we settled to move to Java7 first and then to Java8.

So here is the plan:

  • Starting Jenkins 1.608, we start advertising that we will be moving on to Java7, which is why you are reading this.
  • Starting Jenkins 1.610 (2 weeks from now), we will ship so-called 51.0 class files that will only load on Java7+. This gives some more warnings to those who don't read our blog.
  • Unless we hear uproar from users, starting around 1.614 (6 weeks from now), core developers will start linking directly to new Java7 APIs. We will move on to servlet 3.0 at this time as well.
  • The current 1.596 line of LTS will remain compatible with Java6, and most likely the next LTS line will also remain compatible with Java6. So LTS users have additional 3 months before upgrading to Java7.

Java7 has more NIO improvements that allow us to do some file I/O in more portable manner. Similarly, servlet 3.0 will help us build more interactive UI.

Your Jenkins master and all the build slaves need to be running on Java7+. Similarly, those who are using the Maven2 job type must also run Maven with Java7+. However, this does not prevent you from using Jenkins to build your applications that are targeted to earlier versions of Java. According to our research, most platforms people run Jenkins on has been already shipping Java7 for quite some time now. But if you have a good reason why we shouldn't force everyone to Java7, please let us know ASAP.

To put this into context, Oracle will not release updates to Java7 past April 2015. We have always recommended users to run the latest general release according to Oracle, which is currently Java8. As I said, I suspect we will be requiring Java8 pretty soon. So if you are still running Java6, you should definitely upgrade to Java8.

Categories: Open Source

Codehaus & Ben: Thank You and Good Bye

Sonar - Thu, 03/26/2015 - 20:55

It seems very natural today that SonarQube is hosted at Codehaus, but there was a time when it was not! In fact joining Codehaus was a big achievement for us; you might even say it was one of the project’s first milestones, because Codehaus didn’t accept just any project. That may seem strange today, when you can get started on Github in a matter of minutes, but Codehaus was picky, and just being accepted was a big deal.

It was also a big deal because being accepted by Codehaus gave us access to a full suite of best-of-breed tools: IntelliJ, JProfiler, and Nexus, plus Jira, Confluence, and the rest of the Atlassian suite… This, coupled with the fact that Codehaus took on the burden of hosting and maintaining that infrastructure, allowed us to focus on the SonarQube platform and ecosystem. It enabled us to make what we think is a great product – a product that wouldn’t be what it is today without Codehaus.

The first ticket ever created for the SonarQube (née Sonar) project was SONAR-1, entered in the Codehaus Jira on Dec. 17th, 2007. The project was just under a year old at the time (SonarSource hadn’t even been founded yet). Over the next 7+ years, that ticket was followed by nearly 14,000 more across 42 projects, more than 60,000 emails across two mailing lists, and countless documentation revisions over the many versions of SonarQube and its plugins.

Of course, “Codehaus” really boils down to one guy: Ben Walding, who has been running the 1,000-project forge on his own time and his own dime from the beginning. No matter what was going on in Ben’s life, Codehaus was up. And he wasn’t just “keeping the lights on”, either; Ben always made things not just possible, but easy. So when he told us a couple of months ago that Codehaus was shutting down, it wasn’t really a surprise. In fact, as he said, the writing had been on the wall for a while. But it was saddening. Because no matter how many other options there are today for open source projects, Codehaus will always have a special place in the history of the open source movement and in our hearts.

We’ll announce what Life After Codehaus will look like in May, but in the meantime, we say: Merci beaucoup, Большое спасибо, Heel erg bedankt, Grazie mille, vielen Dank, Suur aitäh, Nagyon köszönöm, and Thank you, Ben. Goodbye to Codehaus, and thank you very much.

Categories: Open Source

Registration for JUC 2015 is Open!

It's that time of the year again: 2015 Jenkins User Conference Registration is OPEN for all cities. This year, we are making some changes to JUC — JUC will be a two-day event in three out of the four cities across the globe. You will get opportunities to network with other users and developers in the community, learn more about how other people are using Jenkins and attacking broader continuous delivery problem. As always, we love to meet & talk to you to learn what you are doing with Jenkins. To get the sense of how JUC is like, take a look at our past JUC reports like this and this.

Early Bird pricing for JUC tickets is available until May 1.

You can learn a lot more information here about the 2015 Jenkins User Conference World Tour. As always, we are tweaking JUC to make it better, based on feedback. I'll post about those in coming months. Make sure to follow or tweet at @jenkinsconf to stay up to date on JUC news or to share which JUC you will be attending!

See you there!

Categories: Open Source

JUC 2015 Call for Paper Deadlines Approaching!

The deadlines to speak at a 2015 Jenkins User Conference are fast approaching. Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to share your Jenkins tips, tricks, stories, and know-how with the community! Submit your proposal by the below deadlines to have your talk considered by a panel of Jenkins experts:

Please note: The deadline to submit a speaking proposal for East Coast US (DC) and Europe (London) is SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 2015. That is only FIVE days away!

2015 JUC Cities & Call for Papers Deadlines

  • East Coast US: Deadline to Submit - March 22, 2015
  • London: Deadline to Submit - March 22, 2015
  • West Coast US (Bay Area): Deadline to Submit - May 3, 2015
  • Israel: Deadline to Submit - May 15, 2015

Not interested in speaking? Contribute to the community in another way: nominate or refer a speaker you would like to hear from at JUC! Contact alytong13@gmail.com or simply become a sponsor.

Categories: Open Source

The speed of a caravan in the desert

Sonar - Thu, 03/12/2015 - 12:22

“What is the speed of a caravan in the desert?” Language Team Technical Lead Evgeny Mandrikov posed that question recently to illustrate a point about developer tools. The answer to the caravan question is that it moves at the speed of the slowest camel. He was using the metaphor to illustrate a point about developer tools: a developer can only work at the speed of her slowest tool.

This is one reason developers want – and smart managers buy – machines with fast processors. We like them not just because we’re gear-head (chip-head?) geeks, but because they get us closer to the ability to work at the speed of thought. But what about the other tools? What about the quality tools?

For the same reason developers want fast processors, fast IDE’s and fast compilers, we also want fast quality tools. Forget the semicolon at the end of a line of Java code and most IDE’s will immediately light it up in red. That fast quality feedback lets you code quickly and efficiently, without agonizing over trivial details.

Similarly, fast feedback on code quality lets you mark features “done and dusted”, and move on. That’s why SonarSource offers three different options for pre-commit analysis. That’s also why we advocate (and practice!) Continuous Inspection. Looking at code quality once a month or once a week or just before a release is waaay too late.

Because developers want to work at the speed of thought, not the speed of corporate bureaucracy. And smart managers want that too.

Categories: Open Source

The Art of Unit Testing

The Typemock Insider Blog - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 15:09

As Roy Osherove wrote in his book, The Art of Unit Testing, “Unit testing isn’t a new concept in software development. It’s been floating around since the early days of the Smalltalk programming language in the 1970s, and it proves itself time and time again as one of the best ways a developer can improve […]

The post The Art of Unit Testing appeared first on The Unit Testing Blog - Typemock.

Categories: Open Source

Google Apps SSO no longer supported in Jenkins OpenID plugin

This is a guest post from Owen Mehegan (aka autojack)

In 2014 Google announced that they will be shutting down their OpenID 2.0 authentication endpoint and replacing it with Google+ Sign-in, a library built on top of OpenID Connect. The old Google endpoint will shut down on April 20th, 2015! Accordingly, if you are using the Jenkins OpenID plugin to authenticate users with the ‘Google Apps SSO’ feature (typically when Google hosts your personal or corporate email), you need to upgrade. Ryan Campbell took the initiative to develop the new Google Login plugin which implements the Google+ Sign-in functionality. This is the recommended solution going forward. Follow the steps here to configure it for your site. Note that you DON’T need to have a Google+ social network account/profile. Any Google account can be used.

If you find yourself locked out of your Jenkins system after the old endpoint is shut down you will need to follow the steps here to disable Jenkins security temporarily. Then you can connect without authentication and switch to the Google Login plugin. You will probably want to uninstall the old OpenID plugin at that point as well.

References:

Categories: Open Source

Jenkins User Conference – Save the Date

We have some exciting news to share with you! We have finalized most of the dates and locations for the 2015 Jenkins User Conference (JUC) World Tour.

Save the date(s):

  • US East (Washington DC): June 18-19
  • Europe (London): June 23-24
  • Israel: July 16 (ETA)
  • US West (Santa Clara): September 2-3

The big news? The JUC agenda has been expanded this year to cover two days! That means you get twice as many opportunities to learn how others are using Jenkins and to network with other Jenkins users.

CALL FOR PAPERS IS OPEN FOR ALL JUC CONFERENCES

We need JUC speakers! The Call for Papers is open now and you can apply here. This is an opportunity for YOU to give back to the community by sharing your Jenkins knowledge and success. Jenkins speakers contribute significantly to the overall JUC experience.

In return for speaking, you will receive free admission to the conference and fame/fortune within the Jenkins community. OK, we can’t guarantee the latter, but we can guarantee the former! Hurry and apply now, because the Call for Papers deadline for US East and Europe expires on March 22, 2015.

Not interested in speaking? Another way to contribute to the community is by letting us know who you want to hear from. Nominate or refer that amazing speaker and we’ll do the rest. Contact alytong13@gmail.com

JUC SPONSORSHIPS

Lastly, be a JUC sponsor. Any organization can do this – whether a vendor that sells into the Jenkins ecosystem or a company that has received value from Jenkins and wants to give back to the community. You can find out more here. (NOTE: JUC is not a moneymaking venture for the community – so sponsorships do make a difference.)

Categories: Open Source

100K Celebration Podcast

As a part of the Jenkins 100K celebration, Dean Yu, Andrew Bayer, R. Tyler Croy, Chris Orr, and myself got together late Tuesday evening to go over the history of the project, how big the community was back then, how we grow, where we are now, and maybe a bit about future.

We got carried away and the recording became longer than we all planned. But it has some nice sound bites, back stage stories, and stuff even some of us didn't know about! I hope you'll enjoy it. The MP3 file is here, or you can use your favorite podcast app and subscribe to http://jenkins-ci.org/podcast.

Categories: Open Source

Eating the dog food

Sonar - Wed, 02/25/2015 - 17:36

The SonarQube platform includes an increasing powerful lineup of tools to manage technical debt. So why don’t you ever see SonarSourcers using Nemo, the official public instance, to manage the debt in the SonarQube code? Because there’s another, bleeding-edge instance where we don’t just manage our own technical debt, we also test our code changes, as soon as possible after they’re made.

Dory (do geeks love a naming convention, or what?), is where we check our code each morning, and mid-morning, and so on, and deal with new issues. In doing so, each one of us gives the UI – and any recent changes to it – a thorough workout. That’s because Dory doesn’t run the newest released version, but the newest milestone build. That means that each algorithm change and UI tweak is closely scrutinized before it gets to you.

The result is that we often iterate many times on any change to get it right. For instance, SonarQube 5.0 introduced a new Issues page with a powerful search mechanism and keyboard shortcuts for issue management. Please don’t think that it sprang fully formed from the head of our UI designer, Stas Vilchik. It’s the result of several months of design, iteration, and Continuous Delivery. First came the bare list of issues, then keyboard shortcuts and inter-issue navigation, then the wrangling over the details. Because we were each using the page on a daily basis, every new change got plenty of attention and lots of feedback. Once we all agreed that the page was both fully functional and highly usable, we moved on.

The same thing happens with new rules. Recently we implemented a new rule in the Java plugin based on FindBugs, "Serializable" classes should have a version id. The changes were made, tested, and approved. Overnight the latest snapshot of the plugin was deployed to Dory, and the next morning the issues page was lit up like a Christmas tree.

We had expected a few new issues, but nothing like the 300+ we got, and we (the Java plugin team and I) weren’t the only ones to notice. We got “feedback” from several folks on the team. So then the investigation began: which issues shouldn’t be there? Well, technically they all belonged: every class that was flagged either implemented Serializable or had a (grand)parent that did. (Subclasses of Serializable classes are Serializable too, so for instance every Exception is Serializable.) Okay, so why didn’t the FindBugs equivalent flag all those classes? Ah, because it has some exclusions.

Next came the debate: should we have exclusions too, and if so which ones? In the end, we slightly expanded the FindBugs exclusion list and re-ran the analyses. A few issues remained, and they were all legit. Perfect. Time to move on.

When I first came to SonarSource and I was told that the internal SonarQube instance was named Dory, I thought I got it: Nemo and Dory. Haha. Cute. But the more I work on Dory, the more the reality sinks it. We rely on Dory on a daily basis; she’s our guide on the journey. But since our path isn’t necessarily a straight line, it’s a blessing for all of us that she can forget the bad decisions and only retain the good.

Categories: Open Source

100K Celebration Podcast Recording

In preparation for Jenkins 100K celebration, I'm going to record a one-time podcast with Dean Yu, Andrew Bayer, and R. Tyler Croy.

My current plan is to go over the history of the project, how big the community was back then, how we grow, where we are now, and maybe a bit about future.

But if you have any other suggestions/questions that you'd like us to discuss, you have 3 or 4 more hours to send in that suggestion! Your feedback would help us make a better recording, so please don't hesitate to tell us.

Categories: Open Source

Four things that blew my mind with “Typemock Isolator”

The Typemock Insider Blog - Tue, 02/24/2015 - 12:49

I just started working at Typemock a few months ago and the company decided that we need to take a hour a week to write about our experience or about anything but is has to be about the company. Believe it or not I actually like writing and not only code. So yeah… I decided […]

The post Four things that blew my mind with “Typemock Isolator” appeared first on The Unit Testing Blog - Typemock.

Categories: Open Source

Test Framework Feature Comparisons – What If We Cooperated?

NUnit.org - Sun, 04/07/2013 - 03:14

Software projects often publish comparisons with other projects, with which they compete. These comparisons typically have a few characteristics in common:

  • They aim at highlighting reasons why one project is superior – that is, they are marketing material.
  • While they may be accurate when initially published, competitor information is rarely updated.
  • Pure factual information is mixed with opinion, sometimes in a way that doesn’t make clear which is which.
  • Competitors don’t get much say in what is said about their projects.
  • Users can’t be sure how much to trust such comparisons.

Of course, we’re used to it. We no longer expect the pure, unvarnished truth from software companies – no more than from drug companies, insurance companies, car salesmen or government agencies. We’re cynical.

But one might at least hope that open source projects might do better. It’s in all our interests, and in our users’ interests, to have accurate, up-to-date, unbiased feature comparisons.

So, what would such a comparison look like?

  • It should have accurate, up-to-date information about each project.
  • That information should be purely factual, to the extent possible. Where necessary, opinions can be expressed only if clearly identified as opinion by it’s content and placement.
  • Developers from each project should be responsible for updating their own features.
  • Developers from each project should be accountable for any misstatements that slip in.

I think this can work because most of us in the open source world are committed to… openness. We generally value accuracy and we try to separate fact from opinion. Of course, it’s always easy to confuse one’s own strongly held beliefs with fact, but in most groups where I participate, I see such situations dealt with quite easily and with civility. Open source folks are, in fact, generally quite civil.

So, to carry this out, I’m announcing the .NET Test Framework Feature Comparison project – ideas for better names and an acronym are welcome. I’ll provide at least a temporary home for it and set up an initial format for discussion. We’ll start with MbUnit and NUnit, but I’d like to add other frameworks to the mix as soon as volunteers are available. If you are part of a .NET test framework project and want to participate, please drop me a line.

Categories: Open Source

Software Testing Latest Training Courses for 2012

The Cohen Blog — PushToTest - Mon, 02/20/2012 - 05:34
Free Workshops, Webinars, Screencasts on Open Source Testing Need to learn Selenium, soapUI or any of a dozen other Open Source Test (OST) tools? Join us for a free Webinar Workshop on OST. We just updated the calendar to include the following Workshops:
And If you are not available for the above Workshops, try watching a screencast recording.

Watch The Screencast

Categories: Companies, Open Source

Selenium Tutorial For Beginners

The Cohen Blog — PushToTest - Thu, 02/02/2012 - 08:45
Selenium Tutorial for Beginners Selenium is an open source technology for automating browser-based applications. Selenium is easy to get started with for simple functional testing of a Web application. I can usually take a beginner with some light testing experience and teach them Selenium in a 2 day course. A few years ago I wrote a fast and easy tutorial Building Selenium Tests For Web Applications tutorial for beginners.

Read the Selenium Tutorial For Beginners Tutorial

The Selenium Tutorial for Beginners has the following chapters:
  • Selenium Tutorial 1: Write Your First Functional Selenium Test
  • Selenium Tutorial 2: Write Your First Functional Selenium Test of an Ajax application
  • Selenium Tutorial 3: Choosing between Selenium 1 and Selenium 2
  • Selenium Tutorial 4: Install and Configure Selenium RC, Grid
  • Selenium Tutorial 5: Use Record/Playback Tools Instead of Writing Test Code
  • Selenium Tutorial 6: Repurpose Selenium Tests To Be Load and Performance Tests
  • Selenium Tutorial 7: Repurpose Selenium Tests To Be Production Service Monitors
  • Selenium Tutorial 8: Analyze the Selenium Test Logged Results To Identify Functional Issues and Performance Bottlenecks
  • Selenium Tutorial 9: Debugging Selenium Tests
  • Selenium Tutorial 10: Testing Flex/Flash Applications Using Selenium
  • Selenium Tutorial 11: Using Selenium In Agile Software Development Methodology
  • Selenium Tutorial 12: Run Selenium tests from HP Quality Center, HP Test Director, Hudson, Jenkins, Bamboo
  • Selenium Tutorial 13: Alternative To Selenium
A community of supporting open source projects - including my own PushToTest TestMaker - enables you to apply your Selenium tests as functional tests for smoke testing, regression testing, and integration tests, load and performance tests, and production service monitors. These techniques and tools make it easy to run Selenium tests from test management platforms, including HP Quality Center, HP Test Director, Zephyr, TestLink, QMetry, from automated Continuous Integration (CI) tests, including Hudson, Jenkins, Cruise Control, and Bamboo.

I wrote a Selenium tutorial for beginners to make it easy to get started and take advantage of the advanced topics. Download TestMaker Community to get the Selenium tutorial for beginners and immediately build and run your first Selenium tests. It is entirely open source and free!

Read the Selenium Tutorial For Beginners Tutorial

Categories: Companies, Open Source

5 Services To Improve SOA Software Development Life Cycle

The Cohen Blog — PushToTest - Fri, 01/27/2012 - 00:25
SOA Testing with Open Source Test Tools PushToTest helps organizations with large scale Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) applications achieve high performance and functional service delivery. But, it does not happen at the end of SOA application development. Success with SOA at Best Buy requires an Agile approach to software development and testing, on-site coaching, test management, and great SOA oriented test tools.

Distributing the work of performance testing through an Agile epoc, story, and sprints reduces the testing effort overall and informs the organization's business managers on the service's performance. The biggest problem I see is keeping the testing transparent so that anyone - tester, developer, IT Ops, business manager, architect - follows a requirement down to the actual test results.

With the right tools, methodology, and coaching an organization gets the following:
  • Process identification and re-engineering for Test Driven Development (TDD)
  • Installation and configuration of a best-in-class SOA Test Orchestration Platform to enable rapid test development of re-usable test assets for functional testing, load and performance testing and production monitoring
  • Integration with the organization's systems, including test management (for example, Rally and HP QC) and service asset management (for example, HP Systinet)
  • Construction of the organization's end-to-end tests with a team of PushToTest Global Professional Services, using this system and training of the existing organization's testers, Subject Matter Experts, and Developers to build and operate tests
  • On-going technical support
Download the Free SOA Performance Kit On-Site Coaching Leads To Certification
The key to high quality and reliable SOA service delivery is to practice an always-on management style. That requires on-site coaching. In a typical organization the coaches accomplish the following:
  • Test architects and test developers work with the existing Testing Team members. They bring expert knowledge of the test tools. Most important is their knowledge of how to go from concept to test coding/scripting
  • Technical coaching on test automation to ensure that team members follow defined management processes
Cumulatively this effort is referred to as "Certification". When the development team produces quality product as demonstrated by simple functional tests, then the partner QA teams take these projects and employ "best practice" test automation techniques. The resulting automated tests integrate with the requirements system (for example, Rally), the continuous integration system, and the governance systems (for example, HP Systinet.)
Agile, Test Management, and Roles in SOA
Agile software development process normally focuses first on functional testing - smoke tests, regression test, and integration tests. Agile applied to SOA service development deliverables support the overall vision and business model for the new software. At a minimum we should expect:
  1. Product Owner defines User Stories
  2. Test Developer defines Test Cases
  3. Product team translates Test Cases into soapUI, TestMaker Designer, and Java project implementations
  4. Test Developer wraps test cases into Test Scenarios and creates an easily accessible test record associated to the test management service
  5. Any team member follows a User Story down into associated tests. From there they can view past results or execute tests again.
  6. As tests execute the test management system creates "Test Execution Records" showing the test results
Learn how PushToTest improves your SOA software development life cycle. Click here to learn how.


Download the Free SOA Performance Kit

Categories: Companies, Open Source

Application Performance Management and Software Testing Trends and Analysis

The Cohen Blog — PushToTest - Tue, 01/24/2012 - 16:25
18 Best Blogs On Software Testing 2011 began with some pretty basic questions for the software testing world:
  • To what extent will large organizations dump legacy test tools for open source test tools?
  • How big would the market for private cloud software platforms be?
  • Does mankind have the tools to make a reliable success of the complicated world we built?
  • How big of a market will SOA testing and development be?
  • What are the best ways to migrate from HP to Selenium?
Let me share the answers I found. Some come from my blog, others from friends and partner blogs. Here goes:

The Scalability Argument for Service Enabling Your Applications. I make the case for building, deploying, and testing SOA services effectively. I point out the weakness of this approach comes at the tool and platform level. For example, 37% of an application's code simply to deploy your service.

How PushToTest Uses Agile Software Development Methodology To Build TestMaker. A conversation I had with Todd Bradfute, our lead sales engineer, on surfacing the results of using Agile methodology to build software applications.

"Selenium eclipsed HP’s QTP on job posting aggregation site Indeed.com to become the number one requisite job experience / skill for on-line posted automated QA jobs (2700+ vs ~2500 as of this writing,)" John Dunham, CEO at Sauce Labs, noted.

Run Private Clouds For Cost Savings and Control. Instead of running 400 Amazon EC2 machine instances, Plinga uses Eucalyptus to run its own cloud. Plinga needed the control, reliability, and cost-savings of running its own private cloud, Marten Mickos, CEO at Eucalyptus, reports in his blog.

How To Evaluate Highly Scalable SOA Component Architecture. I show how to evaluate highly scalable SOA component architecture. This is ideal for CIOs, CTOs, Development and Test Executives, and IT managers.

Planning A TestMaker Installation. TestMaker features test orchestration capabilities to run Selenium, Sahi, soapUI, and unit tests written in Java, Ruby, Python, PHP, and other langauges in a Grid and Cloud environment. I write about the issues you may encounter installing the TestMaker platform.

Repurposing ThoughtWorks Twist Scripts As Load and Performance Tests. I really like ThoughtWorks Twist for building functional tests in an Agile process. This blog and screencast shows how to rapidly find performance bottlenecks in your Web application using Thoughtworks Twist with PushToTest TestMaker Enterprise test automation framework.

4 Steps To Getting Started With The Open Source Test Engagement Model. I describe the problems you need to solve as a manager to get started with Open Source Testing in your organization.

Corellation Technology Finds The Root Cause To Performance Bottlenecks. Use aspect-oriented (AOP)  technology to surface memory leaks, thread deadlocks, and slow database queries in your Java Enterprise applications.

10 Agile Ways To Build and Test Rich Internet Applicatiions (RIA.) Shows how competing RIA technologies put the emphasis on test and deploy.

Oracle Forms Application Testing. Java Applet technology powers Oracle Forms and many Web applications. This blog shows how to install and use open source tools to test Oracle Forms applications.

Saving Your Organization From The Eventual Testing Meltdown of Using Record/Playback Solely. The Selenium project is caught between the world of proprietary test tool vendors and the software developer community. This blog talks about the tipping-point.

Choosing Java Frameworks for Performance. A round-up of opinions on which technologies are best for building applications: lightweight and responsive, RIA, with high developer productivity.

Selenium 2: Using The API To Create Tests. A DZone Refcard we sponsored to explain how to build tests of Web applications using the new Selenium 2 APIs. For the Selenium 1 I wrote another Refcard, click here.

Test Management Tools. A discussion I had with the Zephyr test management team on Agile testing.

Migrating From HP Mercury QTP To PushToTest TestMaker 6. HP QTP just can't deal with the thousands of new Web objects coming from Ajax-based applications. This blog and screencast shows how to migrate.

10 Tutorials To Learn TestMaker 6. TestMaker 6 is the easier way to surface performance bottlenecks and functional issues in Web, Rich Internet Applications (RIA, using Ajax, Flex, Flash,) Service Oriented Architecture (SOA,) and Business Process Management (BPM) applications.

5 Easy Ways To Build Data-Driven Selenium, soapUI, Sahi Tests. This is an article on using the TestMaker Data Production Library (DPL) system as a simple and easy way to data-enable tests. A DPL does not require programming or scripting.

Open Source Testing (OST) Is The Solution To Modern Complexity. Thanks to management oversite, negligence, and greed British Petroleum (BP) killed 11 people, injured 17 people, and dumped 4,900,000 barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. David Brooks of the New York Times became an unlikely apologist for the disaster citing the complexity of the oil drilling system.

Choosing automated software testing tools: Open source vs. proprietary.  Colleen Fry's article from 2010  discusses why software testers decide which type of automated testing tool, or combination of open source and proprietary, to best meets their needs. We came a long way in 2011 to achieve these goals.

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