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Open Source

Official Jenkins LTS docker image

(This is a guest post from Michael Neale)

Recently at the Docker Conference (DockerCon) the Docker Hub was announced.

The hub (which includes their image building and storage service) also provides some "official" images (sometimes they call them repositories - they are really just sets of images).

So after talking with all sorts of people we decided to create an official Jenkins image - which is hosted by the docker hub simply as "jenkins".

So when you run "docker pull jenkins" - it will be grabbing this image. This is based on the current LTS (and will be kept up to date with the LTS) - but does not include the weekly releases (yet). Having a jenkins image that is fairly basic (it includes enough to run some basic builds, as well as jenkins itself) built on the LTS, on the latest LTS of Ubuntu seemed quite convenient - and easy to maintain using the official Ubuntu/Debian packaging of Jenkins.

Docker is a great way to try and use server based systems - it brings all the dependencies needed and the images actually are portable (ie anywhere docker runs you can run docker images). There are official images for many popular server platforms (redis, mysql, all the linux distros and so on) so it seemed crazy to not include Jenkins along with this list.
"docker run -p 8080:8080 jenkins" is all you need to get going with LTS Jenkins now.
You can also use "docker run jenkins:1.554" to get the latest of that lineage of LTS releases, or pick a specific one: "docker run jenkins:1.554.3" if you like. Leaving off a version assumes the latest. Check the tags page to see what is available.

You can read more and see how you can use it here.

There has been some questions and discussions on how to make use of Jenkins with the docker hub for creating new and interesting docker image based workflows for deployment.
In fact, Jenkins featured in one of the first slides of the first keynote of docker con:

To make this dream a reality some additional plugins had to be created - but this leaves the possibility of working with the docker hub (builds, stores images) and Jenkins (workflow, testing, deployment) to build out some kind of a continuous pipeline for handling docker based apps. I attempted to describe this more here.

This image is maintained in this github repo and the official images are build by the "stackbrew" system. (We may move this repo to the jenkinsci github group shortly so keep an eye out).

It will be interesting to watch this grow and change.

Categories: Open Source

Jenkins User Meet-up in London



As I was alluding to earlier, I was hoping to have a meetup of Jenkins users in London for a while. I'm happy to report that the agenda is final and RSVP is open! The date is September 8th.

I'll talk about my recent chef/puppet integration work in Jenkins. Sven from Perforce will talk about how to leverage Perforce features from Jenkins, and then James Nord will talk about workflow. It will be a worthy 2 hours.

If the line up of talks will not be enough to sway you, you should also know that I will bring some Jenkins give-aways!

I'm not sure how many people to expect, but there's a cap at 80 people, so if you are thinking about coming, be sure to RSVP. Looking forward to seeing many of you there!

Finally, if you are in London, the usual suspects (CloudBees, PuppetLabs, XebiaLabs, MidVision, SOASTA, et al) are doing a free event titled "How To Accelerate Innovation with Continuous Delivery" that you might also be interested in.

Categories: Open Source

SonarQube 4.4 in Screenshots

Sonar - Tue, 08/12/2014 - 11:29

The team is proud to announce the release of SonarQube 4.4, which includes many exciting new features:

  • Rules page
  • Component viewer
  • New Quality Gate widget
  • Improved multi-language support
  • Built-in web service API documentation

Rules page

With this version of SonarQube, rules come out of the shadow of profiles to stand on their own. Now you can search rules by language, tag, SQALE characteristic, severity, status (E.G. beta), and repository. Oh yes, and you can also search them by profile, activation, and profile inheritance.

Once you’ve found your rules, this is now where you activate or deactivate them in a profile – individually through controls on the rule detail or in bulk through controls in the search results list (look for the cogs). In fact, the profiles page no longer has it’s own list of rules. Instead, it offers a summary by severity, and a click through to a rule search.

Another shift in rule handling comes for what used to be called “cloneable rules”. We’ve realized that strictly speaking, these are really “templates” rather than rules, and now treat them as such.

Templates can no longer be directly activated in a profile. Instead, you create rules from them and activate those.

Component viewer

The component viewer also experienced major changes in this version. The tabs across the top now offer filtering, which controls what parts of the code you see (E.G. only show me the code that has issue), and decoration, which controls what you see layered on top of the code (show/hide the issues, the duplications, etc.).

A workspace concept debuts in this version. As you navigate from file to file through either code coverage or duplications, it helps you track where you are and where you’ve been.

New Quality Gate widget

A new Quality Gate widget makes it clearer just what’s wrong if your project isn’t making the grade. Now you can see exactly which measures are out of line:

Improved multi-language support

Multi-language analysis was introduced in 4.2 and it just keeps getting better. Now we’ve added the distribution of LOC by language in the size widget for multi-language projects.

We’ve also added a language criterion to the Issues search:

Built-in web service API documentation

To find this last feature, look closely at at 4.4′s footer.

We now offer on-board API documentation.

That’s all, Folks!

Time now to download the new version and try it out. But don’t forget to read the installation or upgrade guide.

Categories: Open Source

User Interface Refresh

This is a guest post from Tom Fennelly

Over the last number of weeks we've been trying to "refresh" the Jenkins UI, modernizing the look and feel a bit. This has been a real community effort, with collaboration from lots of people, both in terms of implementation and in terms of providing honest/critical feedback. Lots of people deserve credit but, in particular, a big thanks to Kevin Burke and Daniel Beck.

You're probably familiar with how the Jenkins UI currently looks, but for the sake of comparison I think it's worth showing a screenshot of the current/old UI alongside a screnshot of the new UI.



Current / Old Look & Feel



New Look & Feel

Among other things, you'll see:

  • A new responsive layout based on <div> elements (as opposed to <table> elements). Try resizing the screen or viewing on a smaller device. More to come on this though, we hope.
  • Updated default font from Verdana to Helvetica.
  • Nicer form elements and nicer buttons.
  • Smoother side panels e.g. Build Executors, Build Queues and Build History panes.
  • Smoother project views with more modern tabs.

You might already be seeing these changes if you're using the latest and greatest code from Jenkins. If not, you should see them in the next LTS release.

We've been trying to make these changes without breaking existing features and plugins and, so far, we think we've been successful but if you spot anything you think we might have had a negative effect on, then please log a JIRA and we'll try to address it.

One thing we've "sort of" played with too is cleaning up of the Job Config page - breaking into sections and making it easier to navigate etc. This is a big change and something we've been shying away from because of the effect it will have on plugins and form submission. That said, I think we'll need to bite the bullet and tackle this sooner or later because it's a big usability issue.

Categories: Open Source

Unit Test Execution in SonarQube

Sonar - Wed, 08/06/2014 - 15:26

Starting with Java Ecosystem version 2.2 (compatible with SonarQube version 4.2+), we no longer drive the execution of unit tests during Maven analysis. Dropping this feature seemed like such a natural step to us that we were a little surprised when people asked us why we’d taken it.

Contrary to popular belief we didn’t drop test execution simply to mess with people. :-) Actually, we’ve been on this path for a while now. We had previously dropped test execution during PHP and .NET analyses, so this Java-only, Maven-only execution was the last holdout. But that’s trivial as a reason. Actually, it’s something we never should have done in the first place.

In the early days of SonarQube, there was a focus on Maven for analysis, and an attempt to add all the bells and whistles. From a functional point of view, the execution of tests is something that never belonged to the analysis step; we just did it because we could. But really, it’s the development team’s responsibility to provide test execution reports. Because of the potential for conflicts among testing tools, the dev team are the only ones who truly know how to correctly execute a project’s test suite. And in the words of SonarSource co-founder and CEO, Olivier Gaudin, “it was pretentious of us to think that we’d be able to master this in all cases.”

And master it, we did not. So there we were, left supporting a misguided, gratuitous feature that we weren’t sure we had full test coverage on. There are so many different, complex surefire configuration cases to cover that we just couldn’t be sure we’d implemented tests for all of them.

Plus, This automated test execution during Java/Maven analysis had an ugly technical underbelly. It was the last thing standing in the way of removing some crufty, thorn-in-the-side, old code that we really needed to get rid of in order to be able to move forward efficiently. It had to go.

We realize that switching from test execution during analysis to test execution before analysis is a change, but it shouldn’t be an onerous one. You simply go from

mvn clean install
mvn sonar:sonar

to

mvn clean org.jacoco:jacoco-maven-plugin:prepare-agent install -Dmaven.test.failure.ignore=true
mvn sonar:sonar

Your analysis will show the same results as before, and we’re left with a cleaner code base that’s easier to evolve.

Categories: Open Source

Geek Choice Awards 2014

RebelLabs started annual Geek Choice Awards, and Jenkins was one of the 10 winners. See the page they talk about Jenkins.

My favorite part is, to quote, "Jenkins has an almost laughably dominant position in the CI server segment", and "With 70% of the CI market on lockdown and showing an increasing rate of plugin development, Jenkins is undoubtably the most popular way to go with CI servers."

If you want to read more about it and other 9 technologies that won, they have produced a beautifully formatted PDF for you to read.

Categories: Open Source

Jenkins figure is available in shapeways

Some time ago, we've built Jenkins bobble head figures. This was such a huge hit that everywhere I go, I get asked about them. The only problem was that it cannot be individually ordered, and we didn't have enough cycles to individually sell and ship them for those who wanted them.

So I decided to have the 3D model of Mr.Jenkins built, which would allow anyone to print them via 3D printer. I comissioned akiki, a 3D model designer, to turn our beloved butler into a fully-digital color-printable figure. He was even kind enough to discount the price with the understanding that this is for an open-source project.

The result was IMHO excellent, and when I finally came back to my house yesterday from a two-weeks trip, I found it delivered to my house:

With the red bow tie, a napkin, a blue suit, and his signature beard, it is instantly recognizable as Mr.Jenkins. He's mounted on top of a red base, and is quite stable. I think the Japanese sensibility of the designer is really showing! Note that the material has a rough surface and it is not very strong, but that's what you trade to get full color.

I've put it up on Shapeways so that you can order it yourself. The figure is about 2.5in/6cm tall. The price includes a bit of markup toward recovering the cost of the design. My goal is to sell 25 of them, which will roughly break it even. Any excess, if it ever happens, will be donated back to the project.

Likewise, once I hit that goal, I will make the original data publicly available under CC-BY-SA, so that other people can modify the data or even print it on their own 3D printers.

Categories: Open Source

JUC Israel report

This year marks the 3rd annual Jenkins User Conference in Israel. While the timing of the event turned out to be less than ideal for reasons beyond our control, that didn't stop 400 Jenkins users from showing up at the "explosive" event at a seaside hotel near Tel Aviv.

Shlomi Ben-Haim kicked off the conference by reporting that JUC Israel just keeps getting bigger, and that we sold out 2 weeks earlier and the team had to turn down people who really wanted to come in. The degree of adoption of Jenkins is amazing in this part of the world, and we might have to find a bigger venue next year to accomodate everyone who wants to come.

IMG_9716

It turns out most of the talks were in Hebrew, so it was difficult for me to really understand what's going on, but the talks ranged from highly technical ones like how to provision Jenkins from configuration management (the server as welll as jobs), all the way to more culture focused one like how to deploy CD practice in an organization. Companies large and small were well represented, and I met with a number of folks who actively contribute to the community.

There were a lot of hall way conversations, and those of us at the booth had busy time.

Thanks everyone who came, thanks JFrog for being on the ground for the event (and congratulations for the new round of funding) and CloudBees for hosting the event. Please let us know if there are things we can do better, and see you again next year!

IMG_9777
Categories: Open Source

.NET in SonarQube: bright future

Sonar - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 11:12

A few months ago, we started on an innocuous-seeming task: make the .NET Ecosystem compatible with the multi-language feature in SonarQube 4.2. What followed was a bit like one of those cartoons where you pull a string on the character’s sweater and the whole cartoon character starts to unravel. Oops.

Once we stopped pulling the string and started knitting again (to torture a metaphor), what came off the needles was a different sweater than what we’d started with. The changes we made along the way – fewer external tools, simpler configuration – were well-intentioned, and we still believe they were the right things to do. But many people were at pains to tell us that the old way had been just fine, thank you. It had gotten the job done on a day-to-day basis for hundreds of projects, and hundreds-of-thousands of lines of code, they said. It had been crafted by .NETers for .NETers, and as Java geeks, they said, we really didn’t understand the domain.

And they were right. But when we started, we didn’t understand how much we didn’t understand. Fortunately, we have a better handle on our ignorance now, and a plan for overcoming it and emerging with industry leading C# and VB.NET analysis tools.

First, we’re planning to hire a C# developer. This person will be first and foremost our “really get .NET” person, and represents a real commitment to the future of SonarQube’s .NET plugins. She or he will be able to head off our most boneheaded notions at the pass, and guide us in the ways of righteousness. Or at least in the ways of .NETness.

Of course it’s not just a guru position. We’ll call on this person to help us progressively improve and evolve the C# and VB.NET plugins, and their associated helpers, such as the Analysis Bootstrapper. He (or she) will also help us fill the gaps back in. When we reworked the .NET ecosystem there were gains, but there were also loses. For instance, there are corner cases not covered today by the C# and VB.NET plugins which were covered with the old .NET Ecosystem.

We also plan to start moving these plugins into C#. We’ve realized that just can’t do the job as well in Java as we need to. But the move to C# code will be a gradual one, and we’ll do our best to make it painless and transparent. Also on the list will be identifying the most valuable rules from FxCop and ReSharper and re-implementing them in our code.

At the same time, we’ll be advancing on these fronts for both C# and VB.NET:

  • Push “cartography” information to SonarQube.
  • Implement bug detection rules.
  • Implement framework-specific rules, for things like SharePoint.

All of that with the ultimate goal of becoming the leader in analyzing .NET code. We’ve got a long way to go, but we know we’ll bring it home in the end.

Categories: Open Source

Planned changes in Jenkins User Conference contact information collection



One of the challenges of running Jenkins User Conferences is to ballance the interest of attendees and the interest of sponsors. Sponsors would like to know more about attendees, but attendees are often weary of getting contacted. Our past few JUCs have been run by making it opt-in to have the contact information passed to sponsors, but the ratio of people who opt-in is too low. So we started thinking about adjusting this.

So our current plan is to reduce the amount of data we collect and pass on, but to make this automatic for every attendee. Specifically, we'd limit the data only to name, company, e-mail, and city/state/country you are from. But no phone number, no street address, etc. We discussed this in the last project meeting, and people generally seem to think this is reasonable. That said, this is a sensitive issue, so we wanted more people to be aware.

By the way, the call for papers to JUC Bay Area is about to close in a few days. If you are interested in giving a talk (and that's often the best way to get feedback and take credit on your work), please make sure to submit it this week.

Categories: Open Source

Workflow plugin tutorial: writing a Step impl

The other day I was explaining how to implement a new workflow primitive to Vivek Pandey, and I captured it as a recording.

The recording goes over how to implement the Step extension point, which is the workflow equivalent of BuildStep extension point. If you are interested in jumping on the workflow plugin hacking, this might be useful (and don't forget to get in touch with us so that we can help you!)

Categories: Open Source

What's new in ApprovalTests.Net v3.7

Approval Tests - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 22:56
[Available on Nuget]
AsyncApprovals - rules and exceptions[Contributors: James Counts]In the end, all tests become synchronous. This means for a normal test we recommendHowever, If you are looking to test exceptions everything changes and you might want to use Removed BCL requirement[Contributors: James Counts &  Simon Cropp]HttpClient is nice way of doing web calls in .Net. Unfortunately, at this time the BCL in nuget does unfortunate things to your project if you do not wish to use the HttpClient. This is a violation of a core philosophy of approvaltests 
"only pay for the dependencies you use
HttpClient was add ApprovalTests 3.6. Thanks to Simon for pointing and troubleshooting this error. It has now been removed. 
Wpf Binding Asserts[Contributors: Jay Bazuzi]This is a bonus from v3.6It is a very hard thing to detect and report Wpf Binding Error. To even get the reports to happen you have to fiddle with the registry and then read and parse logs.No More!  Now to you use BindsWithoutError to ensure that your Wpf binding are working.

Categories: Open Source

Jenkins User Event & Code Camp 2014, Copenhagen

This is a guest post from Adam Henriques.

On August 22nd Jenkins CI enthusiasts will gather in Copenhagen, Denmark for the 3rd consecutive year for a day of networking and knowledge sharing. Over the past two years the event has grown and this year we are expecting a record number of participants representing Jenkins CI experts, enthusiasts, and users from all over the world.

The Jenkins CI User Event Copenhagen has become cynosure for the Scandinavian Jenkins community to come together and share new ideas, network, and harness inspiration from peers. The program offers invited as well as contributed speaks, tech talks, case stories, and facilitated Open Space discussions on best practice and application of continuous integration and agile development with Jenkins.

The Jenkins CI Code Camp 2014

The Jenkins CI User Event will be kicked off by The Jenkins CI Code Camp on August 21st, the day before the User Event. Featuring Jenkins frontrunners, this full day community driven event has become very popular, where Jenkins peers band together to contribute content back to the community. The intended audience is both experienced Jenkins developers and developers who are looking to get started with Jenkins plugin development.

For more information please visit the Jenkins CI User Event 2014, Copenhagen website.

Categories: Open Source

JUC Berlin summary

IMG_9194

After a very successful JUC Boston we headed over to Berlin for JUC Berlin. I've heard the attendance number was comparable to that of JUC Boston, with close to 400 people registered and 350+ people who came.

The event kicked off at a pre-conference beer garden meetup, except it turned out that the venue was closed on that day and we had to make an emergency switch to another nearby place, and missed some people during that fiasco. My apologies for that.

But the level of the talks during the day more than made up for my failing. They covered everything from large user use cases from BMW to Android builds, continuous delivery to Docker, then of course workflow!

One of the key attractions of events like this is actually meeting people you interact with. There are all the usual suspects of the community, including some who I've met for the first time.

Most of the slides are up, and I believe the video recordings will be uploaded shortly, if you missed the event.

Categories: Open Source

Pictures from JUC and cdSummit

I've uploaded pictures I've taken during JUC Boston and JUC Berlin.

JUC Berlin pictures starts with pre-conference beer garden meet-up. See Vincent Latombe gives a talk about Literate plugin. I really appreciated his coming to this despite the fact that the event was only a few days before his wedding:

In JUC Boston pictures, you can see some nice Jenkins lighting effect, as well as my fellow colleague Corey Phelan using World Cup to lure attendees into a booth:

IMG_8721 IMG_8745

Pictures from the cdSummits are also available here and here.

If you have taken pictures, please share with us as your comment here so that others can see them.

Categories: Open Source

Jenkins Office Hours: dotCi

Surya walked us through the dotCI source code yesterday, and a bunch of ideas about how to reuse pieces are discussed. The recording is on YouTube, and my notes are here.

Categories: Open Source

Jenkins Office Hours: dotCi

Tomorrow in Jenkins office hours, Surya Gaddipati will be going over DotCi, a package of features that integrates Jenkins closely with GitHub, configuration via .ci.yml file in source tree, built-in Docker support and MongoDB backend.

I think there's a number of interesting pieces here that could be split into individual plugins for reuse, and possible alignment with existing efforts like Script Security plugin or Literate plugin.

To record the show, this event will be in a different hangout from the usual one, but the time is the same. Looking forward to seeing you!

Categories: Open Source

Jenkins User Meet-up in London?

I'll be visiting London in early September, and if possible I'd love to organize some get together of Jenkins users/devs. I wonder if anyone is interested in hosting the event?

I think it just needs to fit 20 or so people, so all we need is a single conference room somewhere in London. If you think you might be able to help, please drop us a note at the events list.

Categories: Open Source

With great power comes great configuration

Sonar - Thu, 06/26/2014 - 16:16

We’ve got an ambitious vision for the C/C++ plugin this year. To fulfill it, we started with some under-the-cover improvements to the parser and the internal data model. Those improvements were really just a means to an end, but they’ve had the effect of markedly improving our ability to parse and analyze C and C++ code.

Unfortunately, they came with a downside: a higher analysis configuration burden. For instance, in order to correctly expand macros in the code (and we can, now), we need to know what the macro means. Which means that the macro definition needs to be passed in to the analysis.

Just contemplating the configuration update required for a single large system made me queasy, and I wasn’t the only one. So we set the main plugin aside for a little while this spring and wrote a build wrapper, which will eavesdrop on the tool of your choice (e.g. Make or MSBuild) to gather all the extra configuration data for you.

The build wrapper supports the Clang, GCC and MSVC compilers, and is available in 32-bit and 64-bit versions for Windows and Linux and a 64-bit version is available for OS X. Using it couldn’t be simpler. You drop it somewhere on your machine (make sure it’s executable on ‘nix systems), and prepend your build command with it:


build-wrapper --out-dir [output directory] make

Of course, it needs to be a full build that the wrapper is eavesdropping on, so ideally this command would have come after a make clean. And for MsBuild it would be something like:


build-wrapper --out-dir [output directory] msbuild /t:rebuild [other options]

The output directory is where the build wrapper writes its data files, creating the directory if it doesn’t exist. Currently, the build wrapper simply adds its files to the specified directory, but that behavior could change in the future (E.G. someday it might start by issuing rm [output directory]/*).

The build wrapper writes two files: build-wrapper.log and build-wrapper-dump.json. The .log file is just that – a log that Support may ask for if you ever contact them with questions. The .json file is the one that’s actually used during analysis. This screenshot of the build-wrapper-dump.json from my Linux build of CMake should give you an idea what these files look like:
build-wrapper-dump.json

I’m only posting a brief screenshot because the full file is 43,614 lines long (plus a blank line at the end). I’m not saying that all the information in the file is absolutely required for analysis, but it would have taken me a very long time to identify and specify the pieces that are.

Once the build is complete, and your .json file is written, it’s time to kick off a SonarQube analysis. But first you’ll need to tell SonarQube where to find all that extra configuration data the build wrapper just logged. In your sonar-project.properties add the following:

sonar.cfamily.build-wrapper-output=[output directory]

I end up with a properties file that’s only six lines long (including whitespace), and SonarQube has everything it needs to analyze my project:

sonar.projectKey=cmake-linux-clang
sonar.projectName=CMake Linux CLang build
sonar.projectVersion=1.0

sonar.sources=Source
sonar.cfamily.build-wrapper-output=build

If you haven’t used the build-wrapper on your C/C++ projects yet, you should give it a try and let us know how it goes. Hopefully, it will help you drastically improve the quality of your analyses while dramatically decreasing the configuration.

But you won’t have to tell people it was easy.

Categories: Open Source

JUC Boston, what a day!



We kicked off this year's Jenkins User Conference world tour in Boston this Wednesday. The event was well-attended with more than 450 people registered and 400+ people showed up. So big thank you for everyone who came!

Workflow plugin that Jesse presented was a big hit and lit up twittersphere, and while I was only able to listen to parts of sessions as people had questions and comments for me, ones that I've seen were great. Alyssa told me that the sponsors were happy too, which is also important to keep events like this going.

Perhaps the biggest hit of all was the "get drunk on the code show by Steven Christou. When I got in, he packed 30 or so people in the room learning how to write a simple Jenkins plugin, and all the beer bottles were long gone!

One of the "fun" activities we did during the event was a trivia quiz. I'm happy to announce the winners here — Tamara from IBM and Prabhu from Staples. Congrats for your Amazon gift cards!

During the show, I've heard from several people that they'd love to see more regular local meet-ups. Duncan had shown interest in organizing, and Jesse is a Bostonian, so please encourage them to get one going

Categories: Open Source