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Updated: 2 hours 25 min ago

Top Tweets From TestBash 2015

4 hours 25 min ago

Each year, Ministry of Testing throws the leading software testing conference within the UK, and the 2015 edition sure looked like a great time once again from across the pond, with lively sessions from testers including Michael Bolton, Stephen Janaway and Matthew Heusser.

Here’s some of our personal favorite Tweets from TestBash last Friday:

@michaelbolton realized his talk is not funny, so he starts with a joke. #Testbash pic.twitter.com/YtI8Kn5Txz

— Rob van Steenbergen (@rvansteenbergen) March 27, 2015

You said "#testing" but you might have meant "all of development" #testbash @michaelbolton pic.twitter.com/3q2Ul5TpFZ

— Richard Bradshaw (@FriendlyTester) March 27, 2015

Excellent checking must be embedded in excellent testing #testbash @michaelbolton

— Stephen Janaway (@stephenjanaway) March 27, 2015

My favourite safety phrase: I haven't found anything yet that I think may cause a problem. #testbash

— Andrew Morton (@TestingChef) March 27, 2015

#testbash sketch note on @michaelbolton rst what to say talk pic.twitter.com/xVbJaC21e1

— stephen mounsey (@stephenmounsey) March 27, 2015

How do we gain tacit knowledge? Through socialization, and sharpening interactional expertise. Testers take note. @imccowatt #testbash

— Michael Bolton (@michaelbolton) March 27, 2015

@imccowatt …offshore. nearshore. noshore. unshore …"The greater the cultural distance, the larger the required message size" #testbash

— Mark Tomlinson (@mtomlins) March 27, 2015

"No matter how it looks at first, it's always a people problem" @JerryWeinberg referenced by @imccowatt #testbash

— Richard Bradshaw (@FriendlyTester) March 27, 2015

Bloodyhell #testbash is now very mature compared to the first one, well done @rosiesherry

— Villabone (@villabone) March 27, 2015

"If anyone has questions, please first raise your phone and declare your allegiance" #testbash

— Neil Studd (@neilstudd) March 27, 2015

How we felt about #testbash last night after a few beers… V excited pic.twitter.com/mwa1yVSScL

— Villabone (@villabone) March 27, 2015

"Can we please be involved?" @vds4 #testbash pic.twitter.com/rbzdOpvAet

— Rikke Simonsen (@vanilleDK) March 27, 2015

#TestBash has t-shirts in both women and men models. Thank you @rosiesherry, this is me in first ever conf t-shirt. pic.twitter.com/dV2Tm6Bp1S

— Maaret Pyhäjärvi (@maaretp) March 27, 2015

Just having the word tester in your job title downplays your skills in how people see you. Any other way to fix than renaming us? #TestBash

— Maaret Pyhäjärvi (@maaretp) March 27, 2015

Hey @rosiesherry! Congrats on what sounds like another stellar #testbash – Onwards and upwards!

— Keith Klain (@KeithKlain) March 27, 2015

HERE HERE #testbash #fun I could get into these meetings w/ @stevejanaway pic.twitter.com/PNkjprGYIr

— Ryan Rapaport (@ry_rap) March 27, 2015

Lessons learned keeping test community up and running in organization by @stephenjanaway #testbash pic.twitter.com/JkDn9iE7SA

— Rob van Steenbergen (@rvansteenbergen) March 27, 2015

And this is the box :) #testbash pic.twitter.com/8RVBoJJlkg

— Daniel Knott (@dnlkntt) March 27, 2015

To check prevalence of testing myths, look no further than "the hell of LinkedIn discussion groups" @TesterFromLeic #TestBash

— Neil Studd (@neilstudd) March 27, 2015

"I dont have to work in a blame culture to blame myself" @maaretp #testbash

— Rikke Simonsen (@vanilleDK) March 27, 2015

devs relying on testers to find bugs makes devs lazy, hence more bugs … Therefore greater perceived need for testers @maaretp #testbash

— Chris George (@chrisg0911) March 27, 2015

How to make developers excited about testing? Make testing a programming problem (automation) @maaretp #testbash

— Rikke Simonsen (@vanilleDK) March 27, 2015

"Quality is built by developers, it's either there or it isn't" @maaretp #testbash

— Richard Bradshaw (@FriendlyTester) March 27, 2015

Change is slow gradual and hard. To make the point @mheusser showed his pile of clothes – now moved from the floor to the counter #testbash

— Rikke Simonsen (@vanilleDK) March 27, 2015

"I CAN AUTOMATE ALL THE THINGS!… I have automated too many things!" @FriendlyTester #testbash

— Neil Studd (@neilstudd) March 27, 2015

"You need to think about what you're testing and how automation can help you" @FriendlyTester #testbash

— Simon Prior (@siprior) March 27, 2015

If you don't like how things are, you can change it. "It doesn't have to be this way" @FriendlyTester quoting @JerryWeinberg #TestBash #PSL

— mheusser (@mheusser) March 27, 2015

Definite theme running through #testbash this year. Lots of entertaining experiential sessions with shrewd takeaways. 2015 = best yet!

— Neil Studd (@neilstudd) March 27, 2015

As testers we ask a lot of questions. It puts pressure on people. Let's get good at it. @karennjohnson #testbash

— Rikke Simonsen (@vanilleDK) March 27, 2015

https://twitter.com/TheTestDoctor

Try to ask different people the same question. It reveals bugs and communication gaps @karennjohnson #testbash

— Rikke Simonsen (@vanilleDK) March 27, 2015

99 seconds talks starting #testbash pic.twitter.com/oM5LtrCObl

— Rob van Steenbergen (@rvansteenbergen) March 27, 2015

If you can't get money for conferences, ask for time. Time is valuable. @JokinAspiazu #testbash

— mheusser (@mheusser) March 27, 2015

Open session fun and games at the #testbash workshops yesterday pic.twitter.com/UgAZj0njSe

— Kim Knup (@Punkmik) March 27, 2015

#testbash was just awesome, see you next year.

— Daniel Knott (@dnlkntt) March 27, 2015

That point at which you realise you've been on the train for 10 mins and you still have your #testbash sticker on :)

— Stephen Janaway (@stephenjanaway) March 27, 2015

Thank you @rosiesherry & organisers of #testbash for such an awesome day! very well done!!! #1stTestbash #thumbsup :) pic.twitter.com/brSK4mJrKu

— tlk2eva (@tlk2eva) March 27, 2015

The post Top Tweets From TestBash 2015 appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

10 Things to Know About Software Testers

9 hours 7 sec ago

Testers rarely get the spotlight, and some may think that they have it easy playing with apps all day. But to assume this would be inaccurate — software testers are a unique bunch, and there’s a lot about them that may surprise you.

In our own uTesters’ words, here’s 10 things to know about software testers:

  1. We need to be excellent record-keepers for everything that we do — if not, we’ll be the first to be blamed if somethingSoftware-testing-trends-2013 goes wrong.
  2. We indeed understand business needs, and can adjust testing as necessary on-the-fly to meet these needs.
  3. When it looks like we’re just playing with our phones all day, we are actually working!
  4. It takes just as much thought to test the code properly as it does to write it.
  5. Our field can be quite rewarding, financially and personally, and there is ample opportunity for growth and influence.
  6. Testers are exceptionally diverse, in pretty much every measurable way.
  7. You don’t need a degree for it, and there are no degrees in software testing.
  8. Despite all of the attention developers get, we exist, too.
  9. Despite not developing the app ourselves, we know almost every aspect and the ins-and-outs of the app.
  10. We can’t guarantee quality and that an app is bug-free — with tight deadlines, testing everything is impossible.

What would you add to this list? Let us know in the comments below.

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Categories: Companies

Facebook Embraces Developers and App Monetization at F8

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 19:30

On Wednesday, Facebook held its annual F8 developer conference in San Francisco, where they announced a number of new innovations and updates to their current offerings.

If it wasn’t already clear from their spate of acquisitions (Instagram, WhatsA10323555_10101141198471157_883645609_opp) and novel products (Facebook at Work), this conference reinforced the notion that Facebook wants to be seen as a holistic suite of apps. Below are some of the biggest announcements from F8.

Facebook Messenger will be opened up to developers

Facebook revealed that it has paid out over $8 billion to developers using its platform over the past five years. In a move that will surely please the above-mentioned developer community, Facebook announced that they will open up their Messenger platform for the creation of new apps and functionalities. This move should give the 600 million monthly active Messenger users some new toys to play with.

Embeddable videos

By introducing the ability for users to embed their Facebook videos on other sites, Facebook is taking direct aim at YouTube. The addition of this feature improves the usefulness and functionality of Facebook’s main product, and may not only encourage more users to create videos on their platform, but also help drive engagement in general.

Chatting with businesses directly

Facebook has decided business transactions should be more personal. In order to make this a reality, they have introduced the ability for users of Messenger to complete orders through the app, and communicate about their order with employees of the business they are buying from.

Is this something that shoppers want? In many ways that remains to be seen, but there is something to be said for making the steps from purchase to delivery more transparent, and giving consumers a more social experience.

Analytics for Apps

With the glut of third-party apps developed on the the Facebook platform, it only makes sense that the creators of these apps might want to know a little about who is actually using them.

By introducing an apps analytics interface, Facebook is helping these developers get to know their users a little more intimately. Although there are already a number of analytics tools available to app-makers, Facebook is hoping to provide an native option that offers more functionality.

What do you think about the new areas Facebook is expanding into? Can these new products and features help counteract the declining user growth Facebook has experienced? Let us know in the comments below.

Not a uTester yet? Sign up today to comment on all of our blogs, and gain access to free training, the latest software testing news, opportunities to work on paid testing projects, and networking with over 150,000 testing pros. Join now.

The post Facebook Embraces Developers and App Monetization at F8 appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Vote Now to Send One Lucky uTester to STAREAST

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 16:38

One uTester is a step away from some testing fun in the sun.

uTesters have been busy filming their most compelling reasons on why they should be sent to STAREAST 2015 logoStarEast– and the time has now come to view and vote for your favorite entries. The uTest & TechWell STAREAST contest voting is officially live!

With the voting period now through 11:59pm ET on April 4, testers will have their chance to vote on the most compelling and creative entries, and send one of their peers to STAREAST 2015 in sunny Orlando, Florida, May 3-8. The grand prize of over $5,000 includes admission to the show, airfare, and all accommodations and meals for the duration of the conference.

Judges from uTest and TechWell will select from among the most liked/voted videos to pick the lucky winner, so be sure to vote for your favorites now.

Have a favorite yourself, or participated in the contest? Be sure to share your submission on your favorite social media networks to get the exposure your video deserves…and all the votes! After you vote, follow the results in real-time every step of the way with our Leaderboard.

VOTE NOW!

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Categories: Companies

Software Testing With a Spoon (And Other Interesting Interview Topics)

Thu, 03/26/2015 - 19:05

indexFrequent uTest contributor Daniel Knott recently penned a nice piece on ‘how to test a spoon.‘ It was a question used during a software testing job interview that Daniel stumbled upon.

OK, so you’re probably asking — why in the heck would I test a spoon in the first place? But if you’re asking this question according to Knott, you’re just in the wrong mindset when this curveball is thrown your way.

Knott argues that it’s less about the process of actually breaking the spoon, and more about the thoughts the question elicits:

  • What is the purpose of this spoon?
    • Will it be used as a normal spoon for soup or will it be used in a chemical environment for acid liquids?
  • What is the area of operation of this spoon?
    • Will it be used in a hot or cold environment?
  • What material is it made of?
    • Is it made of plastic, metal or wood?

Have you ever been asked to test a spoon during a job interview? Have you ever been asked any other unusual brain teasers or questions while interviewing for a job? How did you approach the question? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below!

Not a uTester yet? Sign up today to comment on all of our blogs, and gain access to free training, the latest software testing news, opportunities to work on paid testing projects, and networking with over 150,000 testing pros. Join now.

 

The post Software Testing With a Spoon (And Other Interesting Interview Topics) appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

uTest Announces Winning Testers of the Quarter for Q1 2015

Wed, 03/25/2015 - 17:12

uTest is proud to announce the first 2015 Testers of the Quarter for Q1!badgeTesterOfQuarter

Our quarterly community recognition program exists solely to recognize and award the rock stars of our global community. Testers recently concluded voting for their peers and mentors, recognizing their dedication and quality work in various facets of uTest participation including test cycle performance, course writing and blogging, and Forums participation.

In addition to the winners below, you can also view their names now in our uTest Hall of Fame. Without further ado, here are the Q1 2015 Testers of the Quarter at uTest:

Outstanding Forums Contributors
David Petura, Czech Republic
David Shakhunov, United States
Bhudev Dalal, India

Outstanding Content Contributors
George McConnon, United Kingdom
Evan Hjelmstad, United States

Outstanding TTLs
George McConnon, United Kingdom
Nadezda Jerjomina, Latvia
Linda Peterson, United States

Outstanding Testers, TTLs’ Choice
Matthew Duval, United States
Milos Dedijer, Serbia

A big congratulations to all of those that had the distinction of being recognized by their peers for the first 2015 edition of Tester of the Quarter. We even had some multiple-quarter-and-category winners lighting it up this quarter, and continuing to be rockstars in the eyes of their peers! Additionally, while their names may not be here, there were also countless other testers that got individual praise along the way — their hard work did not go unnoticed.

Leave your congratulations in the Comments below, or visit the Forums to see the full announcement…along with some of the tester praise that led to these distinctions!

The post uTest Announces Winning Testers of the Quarter for Q1 2015 appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Learn How to Find Highly Valuable Bugs

Tue, 03/24/2015 - 20:01

uTest University recently hosted a “How to Find Highly Valuable Bugs” live webinar, led by Test Team Leads (TTLs) Dave D’Amico and Todd Miller. Dave’s experience in software support/system administration and Todd ‘s perspective as a former test manager on the customer side provided some unique insights into the bug hunting and bug reporting process.

Some tester tips from the webinar include:

  • It is important to know the customer’s product life cycle and where your testing fits in to that life cycle.
  • Know the scope and known issues for your test cycle so that you recognize a high value bug when you encounter one.
  • Monitor the cycle and see what other testers are submitting. Are there traits to the approved bugs that you adopt to improve your own reporting?
  • Every cycle is unique, so a tester needs to adapt based on the information given in each new cycle.
  • Context builds value! Bug reports often get sent to people on the customer side who were not part of the test cycle. Make sure your bug report is written so that everyone can understand it.

In this excerpt from the webinar, Dave and Todd talk about the concept of “high value” and why that can be different between different customers and test cycles. You can also view the full recorded webinar.

 

For more courses, how-tos and webinars, check out uTest University, your source for free software testing training.

Not a uTester yet? Sign up today to comment on all of our blogs, and gain access to free training, the latest software testing news, opportunities to work on paid testing projects, and networking with over 150,000 testing pros. Join now.

The post Learn How to Find Highly Valuable Bugs appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Top Tweets From James Bach’s uTest Twitter Chat

Mon, 03/23/2015 - 18:23

Last week @uTest hosted a Twitter Chat with the one-and-only James Bach — Context-Driven Testing champion and disruptor of the software testing industry for over 25 years. James was gracious enough to donate his fee for the session to Per Scholas, which is currently in the midst of bringing 150 software testing jobs to underserved communities in The Bronx.

During the one-hour chat, we threw a lot of questions James’ way, all sourced from our uTesters. There were also a lot of spontaneous great discussions that arose organically out of the discussion points.

Here are some of the top tweets and discussions that took place over the one-hour chat with James and participants. You can also check out the whole conversation on Twitter at #uTestBach.

On what defines ‘real’ testers:

A real tester is someone who's primary aim is to find important problems before it's too late. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

@varadaraj_n There's an important distinction: intention. A real tester sets out to find problems. Others are victims. @jamesmarcusbach

— Michael Bolton (@michaelbolton) March 21, 2015

Testing is all about discovering business risks with respect to products. It's not about resolving the risk. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

The biggest problem in software testing today:

A1.1) I think the biggest problem is the lean development/continuous deployment faddishness. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

A1.2) Lots of young people have stars in their eyes about what automation can do, because of it. This erodes testing culture. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

Three ways to become a better tester:

@achelleRay 1. watch yourself test very carefully, in great detail. 2. Read Jerry Weinberg books. 3. Study technology #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

Why Context-Driven Testing?

@jamesmarcusbach Does this mean you believe CDT is the /only/ way to approach Software Testing? #uTestBach

— Rachelle Below (@achelleRay) March 20, 2015

@achelleRay CDT, by definition, means doing what works, instead of what someone wants to force you to do. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

@achelleRay Obviously, CDT is not the only paradigm. There are others. Obviously, I think CDT is the only reasonable one. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

@achelleRay To me, Context Driven *Anything* means considering the situation before deciding or doing 1/2 @jamesmarcusbach

— dsynadinos (@dsynadinos) March 20, 2015

Context-Driven Testing means learning your craft, so that you know how to solve problems that arise in it. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

But what about the other “types” of testing?

A2.1) The most common other type of testing is Factory School testing. This means deskilling the craft. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

A2.2) The aim is to make humans interchangeable so that testing is theoretically controlled by management, not testers. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

Would you consider Factory School Testing "Testing"? #utestbach

— Lucas Dargis (@LucasDargis) March 20, 2015

@LucasDargis I consider it fake testing. But often some real testing happens under the covers. We call that "stealth testing." #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

Are there any other "real" types of testing, other than CDT? #utestbach

— Lucas Dargis (@LucasDargis) March 20, 2015

@LucasDargis Yes. The Analytical and Agile Schools are real testing, in my opinion. I think CDT is better, though. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

 Advice to testers fighting a losing battle for change when testing is constantly being devalued as a craft:

A3.1) I advise them to watch and learn. Study how and why testing artifacts don't encode real testing activity. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

A3.3) I also advise to develop their testing reputations publicly and use that to get a better job. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

 On standing out from the crowd as a tester:

@jamesmarcusbach How do you stand out from the crowd? Especially when you don't have much experience? #uTestBach

— Andrei Duda (@byakugandida) March 20, 2015

@byakugandida You are standing out from the crowd right now. Now what are you going to do to impress us?#uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

@achelleRay Raise the level of conversation on LinkedIn, Google+, Quora, Stack Exchange, etc. @jamesmarcusbach @byakugandida

— Michael Bolton (@michaelbolton) March 21, 2015

@achelleRay Participate in Weekend Testing. Attend testing meet ups (or start one). Take BBST class. @jamesmarcusbach @byakugandida

— Michael Bolton (@michaelbolton) March 21, 2015

On using ‘honey’ instead of ‘vinegar’ to attract people to context-driven testing:

A4.2) Unfortunately, we are faced with some very bad people promoting a lot of fraud. Honey doesn't help with them. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

A4.4) I mostly do use honey with newbies. I reserve the stick for so-called experts who should damn well know better. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

The future of testing:

A7.2) I think in the far future, a lot of testing of web and apps will be done live in the field. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

A7.3) I think there will continue to be huge security failures and other outages because of lax testing. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

A7.4) And skilled testing will be a niche community within the wider world of cowboy software development. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

And we close with more duels with ISO 29119:

A6.4) The ISST is fighting against the stupid and evil ISO 29119 standard. So I love them. #uTestBach

— James Marcus Bach (@jamesmarcusbach) March 20, 2015

Not a uTester yet? Sign up today to comment on all of our blogs, and gain access to free training, the latest software testing news, opportunities to work on paid testing projects, and networking with over 150,000 testing pros. Join now.

The post Top Tweets From James Bach’s uTest Twitter Chat appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

uTest Announces Collaboration With expo:QA, Conference Discount

Tue, 03/17/2015 - 15:30

SquareButton(125x125)-01uTest is happy to announce its collaboration with expo:QA 2015, the meeting point for software testing and quality professionals in Spain and Europe.

The 2015 edition of the conference will be held June 8-11, 2015, in Madrid, Spain. expo:QA has successfully consolidated itself as the biggest and most prestigious event in southern Europe dedicated to this field.

The schedule once again is packed with keynotes from notable speakers including David Evans, Zeger Van Hese and Cesario Ramos, and diverse sessions including The Agile Testing Mindset, The Internet of Everything – How Will We Test it?, and Security Testing in Mobile Applications.

As part of this collaboration, uTest has secured an exclusive 15% discount off the already low early bird price for all conference/tutorial packages. Please email testers@utest.com for an exclusive discount code (available to uTesters only for one-time use) to use at registration checkout. Additionally, as an added bonus to uTesters, the first five to register with the discount will receive free admission to the conference networking dinner, a 70 Euro value!

For more information on expo:QA including a full schedule of all sessions and registration, visit the conference listing on the uTest Events Calendar or the official expo:QA 2015 website.

Not yet a uTester? Sign up for free today to gain access to exclusive tester discounts to events like this one, free training, the latest software testing news, opportunities to work on paid testing projects, and networking with over 150,000 testing pros.

The post uTest Announces Collaboration With expo:QA, Conference Discount appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

uTest to Host Twitter Chat With James Bach: Submit Your Questions Now

Mon, 03/16/2015 - 19:35

JamesBach-200x200uTest is happy to announce that it will be hosting a live Twitter chat with context-driven testing champion and software testing industry disruptor James Bach this Friday, March 20, at 12pm Eastern Time.

If you’re a software tester, chances are, you’re probably pretty familiar with James. But for those that are not, he is synonymous with testing, and has been disrupting the industry and influencing and mentoring testers since he got his start in software testing over 25 years ago at Apple. Along with Cem Kaner, James is one of the founding leaders of Context-Driven Testing.

For those that have never participated in a Twitter chat, here’s how it will work:

  1. Show up at 12pm ET on Friday and navigate to the #uTestBach hashtag on Twitter to follow the discussion.
  2. James will be answering questions that @uTest will be tweeting out (sourced from the community!). Questions will be labeled Q1, Q2, etc., while James’ answers will be designated A1, A2, and so on.
  3. In addition to James’ responses, testers are encouraged to reply with their own responses to the currently trending question, and tweet in response to James or other fellow testers’ responses. In short, the discussion can go in any number of directions!
  4. Always just remember to use the #uTestBach hashtag in any response/Tweet during the discussion so others can see your thoughts in real-time.

And beyond participation in the Twitter chat itself, we’re looking for YOUR questions for James that @uTest will be tweeting out this Friday. Have something you want James to answer? Let us know now in the comments below.

Be sure to also spread the word amongst your testing peers — the more participants there are, the more lively a debate it will be with one of the most passionate testing personalities out there!

Not a uTester yet? Sign up today to comment on all of our blogs, and gain access to free training, the latest software testing news, opportunities to work on paid testing projects, and networking with over 150,000 testing pros. Join now.

The post uTest to Host Twitter Chat With James Bach: Submit Your Questions Now appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

uTest Announces Tester of the Quarter for Q1 2015

Mon, 03/16/2015 - 15:00

uTest is once again happy to announce our popular community recognition program, Tester of the Quarter, is back for Q1 badgeTesterOfQuarterof 2015.

This quarterly program exists solely to recognize and award the rock stars of our global community. This one’s unique in that it puts the power of nominations directly in the hands of our testing community.

Testers can recognize their peers’ dedication and great work in various facets of their participation at uTest — from memorable and helpful content submitted to uTest University or the Blog, to test cycle participation — and recognize mentors who have helped them along their testing journey on paid projects at uTest.

Notable first-time winners from the last edition in Q4 of 2014 included Milos Dedijer and Patryk Raba (both also 2014 uTesters of the Year!), along with Nicolas Bellagamba and Karthik Vallabhaneni.

We’ll be tallying up winners next week when voting ends, and these winners will have their name forever enshrined in the uTest Hall of Fame, our recognition hub for the uTest Community! Many of our testers have also used these wonderful distinctions as a badge of honor on their LinkedIn profiles to bolster their careers.

If you are a uTester, submit your nominations now through Tuesday, March 24. Whether or not you vote, stop by anyways and see the great compliments being traded about fellow uTesters as they are submitted in real-time!

The post uTest Announces Tester of the Quarter for Q1 2015 appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Register Now for uTest’s ‘How to Find Highly Valuable Bugs’ Webinar

Fri, 03/13/2015 - 17:41

The next live webinar session from uTest University is now open for registration. Join uTest Test Team Leads (TTLs) for a discussion about highly valuable bugs – what they are, traits of these bugs and how to find them – in this “How to Find Highly Valuable Bugs” webinar. magnifying-glass

Participants in the webinar will learn:

  • What is a highly valuable bug?
  • What does a highly valuable bug mean?
  • What are the traits of a highly valuable bug?
  • What if my highly valuable bug is not approved?

Webinar Details

  • What: A live webinar presented by uTest TTLs called “How to Find Highly Valuable Bugs”
  • When: Wednesday, March 18, 2015 from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM EDT
  • How: Register now! Seats are limited. Once slots are filled, the webinar is full.

You can also catch up on the most recent webinars from University, now available on-demand! Check out  Introduction to Security Testing, Build the “right” regression suite using Behavior-Driven Testing (BDT), and Introduction to Android Testing.

The post Register Now for uTest’s ‘How to Find Highly Valuable Bugs’ Webinar appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Top 10 Paid Software Testing Projects at uTest

Wed, 03/11/2015 - 20:41

With access to paid testing projects from companies all over the world, uTestLogoBlackour global community of over 150,000 testers have the ability to put their software testing expertise to use and earn some extra income on the side.

Some of the companies our uTesters work with include the hottest brands in tech and retail, from Google to Netflix, all the way down to fast-growing startups.

Here’s 10 of the most in-demand projects we’re currently sourcing testers for from our community. Be sure to also check out even more active and ongoing opportunities at our revamped Projects Board.

Not a uTester yet? Sign up today to gain access to opportunities to work on paid testing projects like these, free training, the latest software testing news, and networking with over 150,000 testing pros. Join now.

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Categories: Companies

With HBO Now, the Streaming ‘Bubble’ Is On Its Way to Bursting

Tue, 03/10/2015 - 18:56

cable-tv-alternatives-ways-watch-free-tv-movies-online-streaming-lower-bill-save_0.jpgLike many ‘Millenials’ (as society likes to call my generation), I reveled at the thought of cutting the TV cord with the announcement yesterday that you no longer need to be tethered to cable providers to bask in the glory that is ‘not TV…It’s HBO.’

And the price point of $14.99 didn’t bother me much, either. Sure, I’m paying only $8.99 a month for Netflix, but for access to first-tier films and shows like True Detective and the entire back catalog of programs like The Sopranos? Yes, please.

But the more I thought of how the costs could skyrocket, the more I thought that we’ll be soon on the verge of a digital crisis much like the one cable companies are in the midst of — people fed up with paying too much.

For example, I’ll still need a top-tier broadband connection to watch this said content. DSL or something in this realm won’t cut it for my HDTV streaming needs, and in my area, Verizon FIOS isn’t an option, so it’s my cable provider or the highway. And cable providers make it pretty tough for you on the wallet when you don’t “bundle” their services together. I’ll be paying upwards of $50 after about a year…and that’s without any streaming services.

Onto those streaming services, House of Cards and True Detective on the same screen involves those $14.99 HBO Now and $8.99 subscriptions together. OK, we’re still talking cheaper than cable providers, but we’re approaching dangerous pricing territory at this point.

And what about my beloved Red Sox? None of the big streaming players offer a limited “live” option for those things that just, well, can’t be on-demand. So in will come an ESPN or hordes of local sports affiliates with their own sports packages to add onto what now is increasingly becoming a streaming “cable equivalent” in price.

Will I still cut the cable cord? You can bet on it. In fact, I’ll be picking up a digital receiver this weekend so I can get the over-the-air stations the way they were intended to be — free.

I just believe we’ll be in the Internet equivalent of ‘cutting the cord’ very soon with a lot of the content providers throwing all their services at once to people, hitting their wallets hard. And we haven’t even talked about the inevitable — subscription costs rising on Netflix and HBO Now as demand increases.

HBO needs to up its game in areas folks care about (sports, namely — an inexpensive add-on per month to have the luxury of some live streaming content?) before there’s way too many services ‘a la carte,’ and the streaming bubble bursts.

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Categories: Companies

Android Wear to Pair With iOS Devices: The Death Knell for Apple?

Thu, 03/05/2015 - 21:30

Power-Couple-iOS-and-Android-Squeeze-the-CompetitionAndroid has always been the antithesis of Apple — they’re the fun, edgier operating system with an openness for new experiences.

So while it may be surprising that a GigaOM report citing French technology website 01net mentions that “Android Wear might be going cross-platform with an iOS app, possibly launching at Google’s annual developer conference in May,” really, that openness to try new things has always been there.

While it’s just a rumor at this point that Android Wear could pair with iOS devices — according to the GigaOM article, the source is unconfirmed — if it were to ring true in May, the Apple Watch could find itself dead in the water.

After all, the Apple Watches carry a premium price point in the vein of previous Apple launches, the ability to only pair with iOS devices, and early batterings from the media that its battery life is less-than-ideal for something that goes on the wrist.

What do you think about Android Wear’s move to potentially pair with iOS devices? Should Apple just wave the white flag? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below.

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Categories: Companies

expo:QA Survey Explores Software Testing Salaries

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 15:30

bannerYou may remember last year uTest conducted a survey on the state of our own community. In the same vein, the expo:QA conference, the meeting point for software testing and quality professionals in Spain and Europe, has its own survey out for the greater testing community. The 4th Annual 2015 Salary Survey of Software Testing Professionals is focused on a far more specific and polarizing topic — testing salaries.

According to expo:QA, “the study allows us to attain a new analysis of a constantly evolving sector and discover how the current economic situation has affected our profession.”

While the study in previous years wasn’t able to provide conclusive salary information for countries other than Spain, the survey is still open to all countries. By promoting it, uTest hopes to see — and encourages — responses from over the world so an interesting story can be told on potential salary disparities from country to country.

As an added incentive for testers, the first 200 to respond will be entered into a raffle for a €50 Amazon voucher to purchase the latest books in testing.

Testers can take the survey now until March 22. Additionally, stay tuned to the uTest Blog within the next couple of weeks to learn more about the expo:QA conference, and how uTesters can get discounted admission to the show.

expo:QA will take place in Madrid, Spain from June 8-11, 2015. Check out this event now and all other software testing events for 2015 at the uTest Events Calendar.

The post expo:QA Survey Explores Software Testing Salaries appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

uTest Partners with TechWell to Send One Lucky uTester to STAREAST in Orlando

Mon, 03/02/2015 - 21:33

Get your bags packed for some testing fun in the sun.logoStarEast

uTest is happy to announce that it has partnered with TechWell / Software Quality Engineering (SQE) to send one lucky uTester on a free trip to its flagship testing conference STAREAST!

What’s STAREAST?

STAREAST 2015 will be held May 3-8 in Orlando, FL, and is the premier event for software testers and quality assurance professionals—covering all your testing needs with 100+ learning and networking opportunities. Featured speakers for the 2015 edition include Dorothy Graham, Jason Arbon, Mike Sowers and Michael Bolton. In short, it’s bound to be another huge year at one of the biggest testing conferences in the United States.

How do you win?

Go to uTest.com/STAREAST and upload your best smartphone videos of why you want to go to STAREAST. Then, start sharing your video and collecting those votes! Share across LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook… any social network you want to help get your video votes.

The uTest and SQE teams will pick one of the most voted videos to be the winner of the free trip!

The Grand Prize

One Lucky uTester will win a grand prize of over $5,000, including:

  • 5-Day Best Value package for STAREAST (Mon-Fri, includes 2 Tutorial Days, 2 Conference Days, and 1 Summit Day) ($3,095 Retail Value)
  • Five (5) nights at the conference hotel provided by TechWell / SQE ($1,125 Retail Value)
  • Meals for the duration of the conference
  • Reimbursement of airfare up to $500 provided by TechWell / SQE

Entry Period:
Between now, March 2 and Midnight, ET, March 26, 2015

Winners Announced:
The week of April 6, 2015

Before You Enter the Contest

Before you shoot that prize-winning video and pack your bags, please see the Official Rules for all details related to the SQE/uTest contest. Remember, this is only open to members of the uTest community. Not yet a uTester? Sign up for free today to gain access to free training, exclusive contests (like this one!), the latest software testing news, opportunities to work on paid testing projects, and networking with over 150,000 testing pros.

Good luck, and we hope to see you in Orlando!

ENTER NOW!

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Categories: Companies

Can You Hack Into Google Chrome? It Could Net You an ‘Infinity Million’

Fri, 02/27/2015 - 20:55

59681140Google once again is holding its annual hackathon for participants to search for holes and major flaws in its Chrome browser. Last year, the bounty was $2.71828 million in prizes.

However, this year, they’ve totally upped the ante — to the infinite degree. In fact, according to Entrepreneur, “Google has changed the nature of the prize money at stake…It now goes all the way up to $∞ million.”

Prizes in the hackathon range from $500 up to a new high of $50,000, and there’s no limit on the reward pool, but that could always be scrapped at the drop of a hat. Google says that the changes “are meant to lower the barrier of entry, and remove the incentive for hackers to sit on discovered bugs until the annual competition.”

This certainly sweetens the pot for hackers everywhere, although I could totally see that blank check of an “infinity million” being a very temporary experiment when competition gets out of hand (and Google’s bank accounts…low).

What would you do with an infinity million?

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Categories: Companies

uTest Takes: Best Software Testing Blogs From the Week of Feb. 23

Fri, 02/27/2015 - 15:30

From time to time, the uTest Blog highlights some of the recent blog entries that uTesters have crafted on their own personbbc-blogsal blogs, along with some standouts from the outside testing world.

Here are some such notables from the week of Feb. 23, 2015:

Blogs This Week from uTesters & uTest Contributors
  • Aspects of a Good Session: Any testers out there presenting at an upcoming conference or want to down the line? uTester Stephan Kämper penned this list of what he values in a “good” session, from humor and pain points, to not overdoing it on the slides, and telling good stories.
  • A Tester’s Portfolio: uTest contributor Stephen Janaway’s latest post from his own blog takes on the fact that while devs may have a robust portfolio, testers usually don’t — afterall, they don’t have a final creation to show for their efforts. What does that mean? They have to create this portfolio themselves through arenas like blogging, sharing presentations online and speaking at testing conferences.
  • Less Eeyore, More Spock: I didn’t grow up a Star Trek fan (I was always a Star Wars guy, myself), but I do know Spock, and frequent contributor Michael Larsen’s view on why testers should aspire to be Spock is thought-provoking. Live long and prosper!
Others That Caught Our Eye
  • Letter to a Starting Tester: This recent post from Joel Montvelisky of PractiTest (whom uTest partnered with for the State of Testing survey) is in the form of a letter, writing back to the ‘1998 Joel’ just starting out. It’s a very cool read, and especially hammers home advice a lot of context-driven testers would be proud of — seeking out fellow testers within your own organization and always questioning/standing your ground. For the tester just starting out — read Joel’s advice!
  • These Chicks Were O.G. (Original Geeks): Why do men get all the love in programming? Statistically there may be more males in the industry, but it downplays all of the important women that made important contributions to programming and testing. Nice post from the Testy Engineer that pays homage to Ada Lovelace and Grace Hopper — two female pioneers in the field.

Have ideas or blogs of your own that you haven’t yet shared with the world? Become a contributor to the uTest Blog today.

Not a uTester yet? Sign up today to comment on all of our blogs, and gain access to free training, the latest software testing news, opportunities to work on paid testing projects, and networking with over 150,000 testing pros. Join now.

The post uTest Takes: Best Software Testing Blogs From the Week of Feb. 23 appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

uTest Platform Updates Focus on Bug Reports

Thu, 02/26/2015 - 18:47
[Testers] require the effective integration of technologies to simplify their workflow and boost efficiency.

- Anne M. Mulcahy

uTesters on paid projects: We’re happy to announce some new uTest Platform functionality, with this week’s release, that enhances the bug reporting experience.

Save Your Bug Reports

It’s now easier than ever to create and save your bug templates. You may remember that in the previous release, we added a field that allowed you to configure a custom bug report template. We’ve simplified this process by allowing you to save the bug report you entered as your bug report template by adding a “Save as Template” button in the lower right-hand corner of the bug report form.

Pic1

We hope that this will enable you to create bug report templates even faster and with more efficiency.

Custom Bug Report Fields

Customers will often require that testers provide specific details in their bug reports. To date, testers had to refer to the scope of the cycle to remember which information to include. However, going forward, a customer or PM can add the following template fields directly in a bug report form:

  • Device Make and Model (their app is on phones, tablets, set top boxes and game consoles)
  • Browsers with versions (Some customers need “exact browser build version”)
  • OS (Service pack version)
  • URL where issue occurs
  • Does issue occur on production (for staging cycles)
  • Login details
  • Does issue occur for multiple login providers
  • Number of times reproduced
  • Other pages with the same issue
  • Reproducibility (x of y times)

Additionally, customers and project managers will have the ability to create other custom inputs to ensure flexibility across all cycle types.

Pic2

We hope that this will help streamline the bug reporting process for our testers, resulting in higher-quality reports for our customers.

If you like what you see, feel free to drop a note in the Forums to share your ideas on these and other recent platform updates!

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Categories: Companies