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Updated: 17 hours 35 min ago

Meet the Bees: Arnaud Héritier

Wed, 02/08/2017 - 23:40

In every Meet the Bees blog post, you’ll learn more about a different CloudBees Bee. This time we are in France, visiting Arnaud Héritier.

Who are you? What is your role at CloudBees?

My name is Arnaud Héritier and I’m a Support Delivery Manager in the Customer Engagement team at CloudBees.

I have used various open-source projects and contributed to them since the beginning of my career. My main contributions are to Apache Maven and Jenkins, thus it was obvious for me to join CloudBees when the opportunity came in May 2015.

Previously I had different roles (Developer, IT Architect, IT Consultant, Professional Services, Release Manager, Forge Manager, …) in various types of companies (software vendors, IT consulting, …). I also worked (in)directly for various companies in non-IT sectors like media, banking, insurance, …

In my spare time I’m contributing to Les cast Codeurs, a French podcast about IT and Java ecosystems, and I’m also leading the program team of the conference Devoxx France.

Developer support engineers are in front of our customers to help them in their daily tasks.

This is a really interesting position for various reasons:

  • We are in contact with many different people
    • Jenkins administrators and users on customers side,
    • Engineers, product management, professional services and many others departments internally at CloudBees,
    • The Jenkins community which is really different compared to many other open-source projects
  • Since Jenkins is used in many contexts we have the opportunity to work on many technical environments and to address many different use-cases from CI to CD.

What does a typical day look like for you?

Our support delivery team is based in 3 timezones (Europe, US east and Australia) to provide 24/7 support. Each team starts its day with a short meeting to synchronize on open/new cases and to request some help. This is a great opportunity to have an overview of what is in progress between 2 regions and to share our knowledge on the different kinds of cases we are managing.

While one of us is taking care to review all incoming cases all others are processing them. We have many different kind of activities:

  • Reply to usage questions and provide advice
  • Troubleshoot an issue with a customer in a screen sharing session
  • Reproduce an issue and propose a fix to the community or our engineering team
  • Contribute to our knowledge base, the product documentation or to documentations provided by the community
  • And much more!

What do you think the future holds for Jenkins?

A really bright future!! I have been a part of the Jenkins community for a very long time (I think I still had some hair when I talked for the first time with Kohsuke on the mailing list) and Jenkins is the only CI/CD tool with such a vibrant community. All of this is due to its extensibility which allowed to create a really large ecosystem, and Kohsuke’s kind leadership. Today, automation tools are evolving to cover more modern usages like continuous delivery/deployment and Jenkins is leading this direction. When you remember that 3 years ago, Pipeline didn’t exist and when you see what Jenkins users are achieving with it today, that’s really impressive! When you see how Blue Ocean is now providing a new user experience … that’s just awesome!

What are some of your best tips and tricks for using Jenkins?

  1. KISS!! Keep It Simple, Silly! Just because you have in your hands an ecosystem with more than 1,000 plugins that doesn’t mean you need to use all of them.
  2. Anticipate: Jenkins is the heart of your automation. You cannot rely on a deprecated tool. Keep it up-to-date, setup a test instance and try new features which may bring some value to you.
  3. Scale: CloudBees Jenkins Solutions are making it easier to scale horizontally. Enjoy it! You’ll use your resources more efficiently, you’ll simplify your platform and you’ll make it robust.

Do you have any advice for someone starting a career in the CI/CD/DevOps/Jenkins space?

Collaborate, communicate and automate!

This is the heart of DevOps and while Jenkins will help you to automate various processes to achieve your CI/CD objectives, the most important thing will be: you!

You find nowadays many resources to discover and learn about this: DevOps Express, DevOps Radio, …

What are some of the most common mistakes to avoid while using Jenkins?

To believe that Jenkins will do auto-magically everything for you. Jenkins is a framework, providing many services, but you are responsible for making it useful!

What is your favorite form of social media and why?

Twitter without a doubt. You have the opportunity to talk with so many different people. Some known, some unknown, but you can exchange on many subjects, technical or not, serious or not, … I really love this.

But let’s be honest nothing replaces meeting people IRL and that’s why I love to attend various conferences as an attendee but also as speaker to share my passion.

Categories: Companies

Meet the Bees: Arnaud Héritier

Wed, 02/08/2017 - 23:40

In every Meet the Bees blog post, you’ll learn more about a different CloudBees Bee. This time we are in France, visiting Arnaud Héritier.

Who are you? What is your role at CloudBees?

My name is Arnaud Héritier and I’m a Support Delivery Manager in the Customer Engagement team at CloudBees.

I have used various open-source projects and contributed to them since the beginning of my career. My main contributions are to Apache Maven and Jenkins, thus it was obvious for me to join CloudBees when the opportunity came in May 2015.

Previously I had different roles (Developer, IT Architect, IT Consultant, Professional Services, Release Manager, Forge Manager, …) in various types of companies (software vendors, IT consulting, …). I also worked (in)directly for various companies in non-IT sectors like media, banking, insurance, …

In my spare time I’m contributing to Les cast Codeurs, a French podcast about IT and Java ecosystems, and I’m also leading the program team of the conference Devoxx France.

Developer support engineers are in front of our customers to help them in their daily tasks.

This is a really interesting position for various reasons:

  • We are in contact with many different people
    • Jenkins administrators and users on customers side,
    • Engineers, product management, professional services and many others departments internally at CloudBees,
    • The Jenkins community which is really different compared to many other open-source projects
  • Since Jenkins is used in many contexts we have the opportunity to work on many technical environments and to address many different use-cases from CI to CD.

What does a typical day look like for you?

Our support delivery team is based in 3 timezones (Europe, US east and Australia) to provide 24/7 support. Each team starts its day with a short meeting to synchronize on open/new cases and to request some help. This is a great opportunity to have an overview of what is in progress between 2 regions and to share our knowledge on the different kinds of cases we are managing.

While one of us is taking care to review all incoming cases all others are processing them. We have many different kind of activities:

  • Reply to usage questions and provide advice
  • Troubleshoot an issue with a customer in a screen sharing session
  • Reproduce an issue and propose a fix to the community or our engineering team
  • Contribute to our knowledge base, the product documentation or to documentations provided by the community
  • And much more!

What do you think the future holds for Jenkins?

A really bright future!! I have been a part of the Jenkins community for a very long time (I think I still had some hair when I talked for the first time with Kohsuke on the mailing list) and Jenkins is the only CI/CD tool with such a vibrant community. All of this is due to its extensibility which allowed to create a really large ecosystem, and Kohsuke’s kind leadership. Today, automation tools are evolving to cover more modern usages like continuous delivery/deployment and Jenkins is leading this direction. When you remember that 3 years ago, Pipeline didn’t exist and when you see what Jenkins users are achieving with it today, that’s really impressive! When you see how Blue Ocean is now providing a new user experience … that’s just awesome!

What are some of your best tips and tricks for using Jenkins?

  1. KISS!! Keep It Simple, Silly! Just because you have in your hands an ecosystem with more than 1,000 plugins that doesn’t mean you need to use all of them.
  2. Anticipate: Jenkins is the heart of your automation. You cannot rely on a deprecated tool. Keep it up-to-date, setup a test instance and try new features which may bring some value to you.
  3. Scale: CloudBees Jenkins Solutions are making it easier to scale horizontally. Enjoy it! You’ll use your resources more efficiently, you’ll simplify your platform and you’ll make it robust.

Do you have any advice for someone starting a career in the CI/CD/DevOps/Jenkins space?

Collaborate, communicate and automate!

This is the heart of DevOps and while Jenkins will help you to automate various processes to achieve your CI/CD objectives, the most important thing will be: you!

You find nowadays many resources to discover and learn about this: DevOps Express, DevOps Radio, …

What are some of the most common mistakes to avoid while using Jenkins?

To believe that Jenkins will do auto-magically everything for you. Jenkins is a framework, providing many services, but you are responsible for making it useful!

What is your favorite form of social media and why?

Twitter without a doubt. You have the opportunity to talk with so many different people. Some known, some unknown, but you can exchange on many subjects, technical or not, serious or not, … I really love this.

But let’s be honest nothing replaces meeting people IRL and that’s why I love to attend various conferences as an attendee but also as speaker to share my passion.

Categories: Companies

Now On DevOps Radio: Choice Hotels and the “Inn-side” Scoop on DevOps Adoption

Tue, 02/07/2017 - 22:41

In this episode, Brian Mericle, distinguished engineer at Choice Hotels International, “checks in” with DevOps Radio host, CloudBees CMO and occasional Jenkins butler, Andre Pino to provide the inn-side scoop on what Choice Hotels - the 75+ year-old franchise that includes Comfort Suites, Comfort Inn, Sleep Inn and Cambria brands - is doing in terms of deployment. He’ll also share his secrets for managing big DevOps teams, without reservations.

Brian explains how Choice Hotel’s DevOps adoption was driven by the need to maintain a competitive advantage in terms of its website and services. Choice Hotels provides web-based services to its franchisees and, in this case, needed to update the central reservation system used by the various Choice Hotels properties to book rooms. The goal was to get to market faster and be a driving force in the market, but manual patterns and processes were presenting roadblocks. By implementing DevOps, Choice Hotels was able to accelerate the upgrade of its central reservation system.

Choice Hotels employees a 250+ person development staff. Brian admits that with a team that big, transitioning to a DevOps culture does not happen overnight. Brian believes there is no such thing as over-communication, and that everyone in IT should always know what’s happening. He tries to meet with all his teams in order to ensure transparency. Sounds like five-star hospitality to us!

This “suite” episode is available now on the CloudBees website and on iTunes. You can also join the conversation on Twitter by tweeting out to @CloudBees and including #DevOpsRadio in your post. Before you check-out make sure you subscribe to DevOps Radio where you can catch up on past episodes.

 

 

 

Blog Categories: Company News
Categories: Companies

Now On DevOps Radio: Choice Hotels and the “Inn-side” Scoop on DevOps Adoption

Tue, 02/07/2017 - 22:41

In this episode, Brian Mericle, distinguished engineer at Choice Hotels International, “checks in” with DevOps Radio host, CloudBees CMO and occasional Jenkins butler, Andre Pino to provide the inn-side scoop on what Choice Hotels - the 75+ year-old franchise that includes Comfort Suites, Comfort Inn, Sleep Inn and Cambria brands - is doing in terms of deployment. He’ll also share his secrets for managing big DevOps teams, without reservations.

Brian explains how Choice Hotel’s DevOps adoption was driven by the need to maintain a competitive advantage in terms of its website and services. Choice Hotels provides web-based services to its franchisees and, in this case, needed to update the central reservation system used by the various Choice Hotels properties to book rooms. The goal was to get to market faster and be a driving force in the market, but manual patterns and processes were presenting roadblocks. By implementing DevOps, Choice Hotels was able to accelerate the upgrade of its central reservation system.

Choice Hotels employees a 250+ person development staff. Brian admits that with a team that big, transitioning to a DevOps culture does not happen overnight. Brian believes there is no such thing as over-communication, and that everyone in IT should always know what’s happening. He tries to meet with all his teams in order to ensure transparency. Sounds like five-star hospitality to us!

This “suite” episode is available now on the CloudBees website and on iTunes. You can also join the conversation on Twitter by tweeting out to @CloudBees and including #DevOpsRadio in your post. Before you check-out make sure you subscribe to DevOps Radio where you can catch up on past episodes.

 

 

 

Blog Categories: Company News
Categories: Companies

Announcing General Availability of Declarative Pipeline

Wed, 02/01/2017 - 04:24

I am very excited to announce the addition of Declarative Pipeline syntax 1.0 to Jenkins Pipeline. We think this new syntax will enable everyone involved in DevOps, regardless of expertise, to participate in the continuous delivery process. Whether creating, editing or reviewing a pipeline, having a straightforward structure helps to understand and predict the flow of the pipeline and provides a common foundation across all pipelines.

Pipeline as Code was one of the pillars of the Jenkins 2.0 release and an essential part of implementing continuous delivery. Defining all of the stages of an application’s CD pipeline within a “Jenkinsfile” and treating it as part of the application code automatically provides all of the benefits inherent in SCM:

  • Retain history of all changes to Pipeline
  • Rollback to a previous pipeline version
  • Review new changes to the pipeline in code review
  • Test new pipeline steps in branches
  • Audit changes to the pipeline
  • Run the same pipeline on a different Jenkins server

We recommend people begin using it for all their pipeline definitions in Jenkins and the CloudBees Jenkins Platform. The plugin has been available for use and testing starting with the 0.1 release that was debuted at Jenkins World in September, it has already been installed over 5,000 times.

If you haven’t tried Pipeline or have considered Pipeline in the past we believe this new syntax is much more approachable with an easy adoption curve to quickly realize all of the benefits of Pipeline as Code. In addition, the predefined structure of Declarative makes it possible to create and edit pipelines with a graphical user interface (GUI). The Blue Ocean team is actively working on a Pipeline Editor that will be included in an upcoming release.

If you have already begun using Pipelines in Jenkins we believe that this new alternative syntax can help expand that usage. The original syntax for defining pipelines in Jenkins is a Groovy DSL that allows most of the features of full imperative programming. This syntax is still fully supported and is now referred to as “Scripted Pipeline Syntax” to distinguish it from “Declarative Pipeline Syntax.” Both use the same underlying execution engine in Jenkins and both will generate the same results in Pipeline Stage View or Blue Ocean visualization. All existing pipeline steps, global variables and shared libraries can be used in either. You can now create more cookie-cutter pipelines and extend the power of Pipeline to all users regardless of Groovy expertise.

Other key features of Declarative Pipeline include:

  • Syntax Checking  
    • Immediate runtime syntax checking with explicit error messages
    • API endpoint for linting Jenkinsfiles
    • CLI command to lint Jenkinsfiles
  • Docker Pipeline plugin integration
    • Run all stages in a single container
    • Run each stage in a different container
  • Easy configuration
    • Quickly define parameters for your pipeline
    • Quickly define environment variables and credentials for your pipeline
    • Quickly define options (such as timeout, retry, build discarding) for your pipeline
  • Conditional actions
    • Send notifications or take actions depending upon success or failure
    • Skip stages based on branches, environment, or other Boolean expression

Be on the lookout for future blog posts here or on Jekins.io detailing specific examples of scenarios or features in Declarative Pipeline.  Andrew Bayer, one of the primary engineers behind Declarative Pipeline, will be presenting at FOSDEM in Brussels, Belgium this weekend. We have also scheduled an online Jenkins Area Meetup (JAM) later this month to demo the features of Declarative Pipeline and give a sneak peek at the upcoming Blue Ocean Pipeline Editor.

In the meantime, we have updated all Pipeline documentation to incorporate a Getting Started guide, a Guided Tour and a Syntax Reference page with numerous examples to help you get on your way. We have also created a Quick Reference card that can be printed and hung nearby. Simply upgrade to the latest version of the Pipeline plugin in Jenkins to enable all of these great features.

 

 

Blog Categories: Jenkins
Categories: Companies

Announcing General Availability of Declarative Pipeline

Wed, 02/01/2017 - 04:24

I am very excited to announce the addition of Declarative Pipeline syntax 1.0 to Jenkins Pipeline. We think this new syntax will enable everyone involved in DevOps, regardless of expertise, to participate in the continuous delivery process. Whether creating, editing or reviewing a pipeline, having a straightforward structure helps to understand and predict the flow of the pipeline and provides a common foundation across all pipelines.

Pipeline as Code was one of the pillars of the Jenkins 2.0 release and an essential part of implementing continuous delivery. Defining all of the stages of an application’s CD pipeline within a “Jenkinsfile” and treating it as part of the application code automatically provides all of the benefits inherent in SCM:

  • Retain history of all changes to Pipeline
  • Rollback to a previous pipeline version
  • Review new changes to the pipeline in code review
  • Test new pipeline steps in branches
  • Audit changes to the pipeline
  • Run the same pipeline on a different Jenkins server

We recommend people begin using it for all their pipeline definitions in Jenkins and the CloudBees Jenkins Platform. The plugin has been available for use and testing starting with the 0.1 release that was debuted at Jenkins World in September, it has already been installed over 5,000 times.

If you haven’t tried Pipeline or have considered Pipeline in the past we believe this new syntax is much more approachable with an easy adoption curve to quickly realize all of the benefits of Pipeline as Code. In addition, the predefined structure of Declarative makes it possible to create and edit pipelines with a graphical user interface (GUI). The Blue Ocean team is actively working on a Pipeline Editor that will be included in an upcoming release.

If you have already begun using Pipelines in Jenkins we believe that this new alternative syntax can help expand that usage. The original syntax for defining pipelines in Jenkins is a Groovy DSL that allows most of the features of full imperative programming. This syntax is still fully supported and is now referred to as “Scripted Pipeline Syntax” to distinguish it from “Declarative Pipeline Syntax.” Both use the same underlying execution engine in Jenkins and both will generate the same results in Pipeline Stage View or Blue Ocean visualization. All existing pipeline steps, global variables and shared libraries can be used in either. You can now create more cookie-cutter pipelines and extend the power of Pipeline to all users regardless of Groovy expertise.

Other key features of Declarative Pipeline include:

  • Syntax Checking  
    • Immediate runtime syntax checking with explicit error messages
    • API endpoint for linting Jenkinsfiles
    • CLI command to lint Jenkinsfiles
  • Docker Pipeline plugin integration
    • Run all stages in a single container
    • Run each stage in a different container
  • Easy configuration
    • Quickly define parameters for your pipeline
    • Quickly define environment variables and credentials for your pipeline
    • Quickly define options (such as timeout, retry, build discarding) for your pipeline
  • Conditional actions
    • Send notifications or take actions depending upon success or failure
    • Skip stages based on branches, environment, or other Boolean expression

Be on the lookout for future blog posts here or on Jekins.io detailing specific examples of scenarios or features in Declarative Pipeline.  Andrew Bayer, one of the primary engineers behind Declarative Pipeline, will be presenting at FOSDEM in Brussels, Belgium this weekend. We have also scheduled an online Jenkins Area Meetup (JAM) later this month to demo the features of Declarative Pipeline and give a sneak peek at the upcoming Blue Ocean Pipeline Editor.

In the meantime, we have updated all Pipeline documentation to incorporate a Getting Started guide, a Guided Tour and a Syntax Reference page with numerous examples to help you get on your way. We have also created a Quick Reference card that can be printed and hung nearby. Simply upgrade to the latest version of the Pipeline plugin in Jenkins to enable all of these great features.

 

 

Blog Categories: Jenkins
Categories: Companies

The State of Jenkins - 2016 Community Survey Results

Tue, 01/31/2017 - 22:22

Last fall, prior to Jenkins World, CloudBees conducted a community survey on behalf of the Jenkins project. We were grateful to receive over 1,200 responses  – and thanks to this input, we gained some interesting insights into what Jenkins users are doing.

Based on the results, it’s safe to say that Jenkins is currently viewed as the #1, continuous integration (CI) server and is rapidly becoming the leading continuous delivery (CD) tool. Adoption of Jenkins 2, which introduced CD pipelines, clear visibility of delivery stages and multiple usability enhancements has skyrocketed to nearly half the active user base.  Once again, there was a lot of consistency in many findings from year-to-year. For example, the number of Jenkins users continues to increase, with 90% of survey respondents considering Jenkins mission-critical.

GET INFOGRAPHIC    |    GET DETAILED SURVEY RESULTS

Here are some of the key findings:

  • The overwhelming majority of respondents, 85% indicated that Jenkins usage had increased. Diving a little deeper, for organizations with more than 50 software projects, almost 30% used Jenkins in 2016 as compared to 16% in 2012.
  • An astounding 46% of respondents were running Jenkins 2, eight months after its release. This matches December 2016 stats from Jenkins.io showing 55% of active installs are running Jenkins 2.
  • Adoption of Jenkins Pipeline for continuous delivery (CD) is accelerating. Respondents who have adopted CD reported that 54% are using Pipeline.
  • The push to production has stayed about the same from last year, 61% of respondents are deploying changes to production at least once per week.
  • Linux is the platform of choice for builds, favored by 85% of respondents, along with 85% choosing Git as the favored source code repository.
  • Half of respondents are deploying applications directly to the cloud, with Amazon Web Services as the favored platform.

We want to thank everyone for completing the survey - and congrats to Iker Garcia for winning a free pass to Jenkins World 2017 and to Dave Leifer for winning the Amazon gift card.

See you at Jenkins World, August 28-31, in San Francisco, California! Register now for the largest Jenkins event on the planet in 2017 and get the Early Bird discount. The Call for Papers is open until March 5 – so submit a talk and share your Jenkins knowledge with the community.

Blog Categories: Jenkins
Categories: Companies

The State of Jenkins - 2016 Community Survey Results

Tue, 01/31/2017 - 22:22

Last fall, prior to Jenkins World, CloudBees conducted a community survey on behalf of the Jenkins project. We were grateful to receive over 1,200 responses  – and thanks to this input, we gained some interesting insights into what Jenkins users are doing.

Based on the results, it’s safe to say that Jenkins is currently viewed as the #1, continuous integration (CI) server and is rapidly becoming the leading continuous delivery (CD) tool. Adoption of Jenkins 2, which introduced CD pipelines, clear visibility of delivery stages and multiple usability enhancements has skyrocketed to nearly half the active user base.  Once again, there was a lot of consistency in many findings from year-to-year. For example, the number of Jenkins users continues to increase, with 90% of survey respondents considering Jenkins mission-critical.

GET INFOGRAPHIC    |    GET DETAILED SURVEY RESULTS

Here are some of the key findings:

  • The overwhelming majority of respondents, 85% indicated that Jenkins usage had increased. Diving a little deeper, for organizations with more than 50 software projects, almost 30% used Jenkins in 2016 as compared to 16% in 2012.
  • An astounding 46% of respondents were running Jenkins 2, eight months after its release. This matches December 2016 stats from Jenkins.io showing 55% of active installs are running Jenkins 2.
  • Adoption of Jenkins Pipeline for continuous delivery (CD) is accelerating. Respondents who have adopted CD reported that 54% are using Pipeline.
  • The push to production has stayed about the same from last year, 61% of respondents are deploying changes to production at least once per week.
  • Linux is the platform of choice for builds, favored by 85% of respondents, along with 85% choosing Git as the favored source code repository.
  • Half of respondents are deploying applications directly to the cloud, with Amazon Web Services as the favored platform.

We want to thank everyone for completing the survey - and congrats to Iker Garcia for winning a free pass to Jenkins World 2017 and to Dave Leifer for winning the Amazon gift card.

See you at Jenkins World, August 28-31, in San Francisco, California! Register now for the largest Jenkins event on the planet in 2017 and get the Early Bird discount. The Call for Papers is open until March 5 – so submit a talk and share your Jenkins knowledge with the community.

Blog Categories: Jenkins
Categories: Companies

Now On DevOps Radio: DevOps Institute Brings DevOps Knowledge to Worldwide Community

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 16:45

Jayne Groll (below) is CEO and co-founder of DevOps Institute, and an expert in IT training. She joins DevOps host, Andre Pino, to discuss how people can get training and certification in DevOps topics - and what exactly that means in an industry where there isn’t a single body of knowledge about DevOps.

Jane explains how a long time ago in a galaxy far away, when screens were still black and green, she was a paralegal manager tapped to provide education and support her company’s IT unit. Since then she has witnessed IT education and certification grow with new roles, competencies and skills, including DevOps.

Jane says for most developers the most difficult part of DevOps is starting the process. The DevOps Institute’s curriculum encompasses a collective body of knowledge including CD and CI, automation, principles of how to architect a DevOps pipeline, test communities, cultural management, DevSecOps (adding security to DevOps) and specific role-based competencies. By participating in this training and certification process, developers and operations teams can gain the skills needed for successful DevOps strategies, so that they can ultimately bring value back to the organization.

Finally, Jayne talks about DevOps Express – a consortium of leading vendors and practitioners in the DevOps space who are providing, collectively, best practices and a reference architecture for organizations trying to undergo a DevOps transformation. DevOps Institute is a founding member of DevOps Express, and Jayne joins with Andre in discussing the value of it for the DevOps community. Listen in to hear more!

Here’s your homework assignment: Catch up on DevOps Radio, available on the CloudBees website and on iTunes, and make note to check back for new episodes!

Want extra credit? Overachievers, make sure you follow @ITSM_Jayne and @CloudBees on Twitter, so you can share your thoughts on the latest episode. All you have to do is mention #DevOpsRadio in your post.

 

 

Categories: Companies

Now On DevOps Radio: DevOps Institute Brings DevOps Knowledge to Worldwide Community

Mon, 01/23/2017 - 04:25

Jayne Groll (below) is CEO and co-founder of DevOps Institute, and an expert in IT training. She joins DevOps host, Andre Pino, to discuss how people can get training and certification in DevOps topics - and what exactly that means in an industry where there isn’t a single body of knowledge about DevOps.

Jane explains how a long time ago in a galaxy far away, when screens were still black and green, she was a paralegal manager tapped to provide education and support her company’s IT unit. Since then she has witnessed IT education and certification grow with new roles, competencies and skills, including DevOps.

Jane says for most developers the most difficult part of DevOps is starting the process. The DevOps Institute’s curriculum encompasses a collective body of knowledge including CD and CI, automation, principles of how to architect a DevOps pipeline, test communities, cultural management, DevSecOps (adding security to DevOps) and specific role-based competencies. By participating in this training and certification process, developers and operations teams can gain the skills needed for successful DevOps strategies, so that they can ultimately bring value back to the organization.

Finally, Jayne talks about DevOps Express – a consortium of leading vendors and practitioners in the DevOps space who are providing, collectively, best practices and a reference architecture for organizations trying to undergo a DevOps transformation. DevOps Institute is a founding member of DevOps Express, and Jayne joins with Andre in discussing the value of it for the DevOps community. Listen in to hear more!

Here’s your homework assignment: Catch up on DevOps Radio, available on the CloudBees website and on iTunes, and make note to check back for new episodes!

Want extra credit? Overachievers, make sure you follow @ITSM_Jayne and @CloudBees on Twitter, so you can share your thoughts on the latest episode. All you have to do is mention #DevOpsRadio in your post.

 

 

Categories: Companies

New In-Product, Upgrade Notifications with CloudBees Jenkins Platform 2.32.1.1

Thu, 01/19/2017 - 20:30

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of CloudBees Jenkins Platform 2.32.1, which offers upgrade notifications and many key improvements such as a bump on the Jenkins core to the 2.32.1 LTS line. You may know that Beekeeper Upgrade Assistant allows users to review and install upgrades of verified components, tested through the CloudBees Assurance Program (CAP). Up to now, this recommended configuration or envelope was only updated when new CloudBees Jenkins Platform releases were announced. Starting with this release, CloudBees can update the configuration between releases, so that fixes can be safely deployed, keeping the Jenkins instance safely in the recommended configuration. Another key improvement, is the LTS upgrade on the rolling release. This LTS bump provides the latest and greatest stable Jenkins core, fixes 50+ bug fixes since the previous LTS release, includes some performance improvements and, most importantly, upgrades the Jenkins Remoting Module from version 2.6 to 3.1. The Jenkins Remoting model is at the heart of all communications not only between Jenkins masters and agents but also between CloudBees Jenkins Operation Center and each client master.

To learn more, read the full blog post on Cloudbees Network (CBN). As the hub of all product related knowledge, CBN is where you will find release details and all future product announcements. 

 

Blog Categories: JenkinsDeveloper Zone
Categories: Companies

New In-Product, Upgrade Notifications with CloudBees Jenkins Platform 2.32.1.1

Thu, 01/19/2017 - 20:30

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of CloudBees Jenkins Platform 2.32.1, which offers upgrade notifications and many key improvements such as a bump on the Jenkins core to the 2.32.1 LTS line. You may know that Beekeeper Upgrade Assistant allows users to review and install upgrades of verified components, tested through the CloudBees Assurance Program (CAP). Up to now, this recommended configuration or envelope was only updated when new CloudBees Jenkins Platform releases were announced. Starting with this release, CloudBees can update the configuration between releases, so that fixes can be safely deployed, keeping the Jenkins instance safely in the recommended configuration. Another key improvement, is the LTS upgrade on the rolling release. This LTS bump provides the latest and greatest stable Jenkins core, fixes 50+ bug fixes since the previous LTS release, includes some performance improvements and, most importantly, upgrades the Jenkins Remoting Module from version 2.6 to 3.1. The Jenkins Remoting model is at the heart of all communications not only between Jenkins masters and agents but also between CloudBees Jenkins Operation Center and each client master.

To learn more, read the full blog post on Cloudbees Network (CBN). As the hub of all product related knowledge, CBN is where you will find release details and all future product announcements. 

 

Blog Categories: JenkinsDeveloper Zone
Categories: Companies

Now On DevOps Radio: Twitter, On Getting to the Last Mile with DevOps

Wed, 01/11/2017 - 00:21

Wen Gu is the Software Engineering Manager of Engineering Effectiveness at Twitter and keynote speaker at Jenkins World 2016. He brings his experience in software development for tech giants to DevOps Radio’s first episode of 2017.

In this episode, special host Sacha Labourey, CEO of CloudBees, chats with Wen about his moves from DevTools to DevOps, Intuit to Twitter and Hudson to Jenkins, covering the evolution of CI/CD and the tricky definition of DevOps. Wen also describes the DevOps cultural experience at legacy tech companies like HP, Yahoo and Intuit, as well as at younger companies like Twitter. He stresses the importance of unifying DevOps’ tools and best practices to get to the crucial last mile of the software delivery process – deployment.

New to DevOps Radio in 2017? Catch up on last year’s episodes, available on the CloudBees website and on iTunes, and make sure to stay tuned for new episodes.

We’d love to hear your thoughts on the latest episode of DevOps Radio. Given Wen’s place of employment, it seems only appropriate to join the conversation on Twitter, which you can do so by including the @CloudBees handle and #DevOpsRadio in your post.

 

Sacha Labourey, CloudBees, and Wen Gu, Twitter, going the last mile together, on DevOps Radio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Companies

CloudBees OSS Demo Days

Tue, 01/10/2017 - 21:44

All of us here at CloudBees are committed to making Jenkins the de-facto tool for continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD). In addition to our CloudBees Jenkins Platform and Private SaaS Edition products we continue to invest heavily in Jenkins through contributions to Jenkins core, Pipeline, Blue Ocean and many vital plugins for Jenkins. Our success is dependent on Jenkins’ success.

This investment in open source software (OSS) is manifest in an engineering team and resources dedicated to contributing bug fixes, security fixes and new features to Jenkins and its ecosystem. All of the work done by this team goes directly towards improving Jenkins and we want to keep everyone up-to-date with the changes we are making. To that end we have begun hosting monthly demonstrations to show off the latest and greatest changes we are working on and answer any questions.

We hosted the first of these “Demo Days” at the end of October and the second at the beginning of December. These videos are publicly available and viewable at anytime. If you have questions, you can always ask someone in IRC #jenkins.

Going forward we are going to host the live broadcast for these demonstrations regularly on the second Thursday of each month at 8 AM PST/4 PM GMT. We are also moving to CloudBeesTV as the host and archive for the videos. I have created a new Playlist for “CloudBees OSS Demonstrations” to allow you to quickly find all related videos. 

The first OSS Demo Day on CloudBeesTV will be this Thursday, January 12, 2017.  We hope you’ll join us and ask questions.

Blog Categories: Jenknis
Categories: Companies