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Bay Area Jenkins Area Meet-up is looking for you

Uday made a blog post yesterday that he is looking at organizing a regular Jenkins meet-up in the Silicon Valley Bay Area dubbed "Bay Area Jenkins Area Meetup (JAM)."

As a first step, he wants to have a kick-off meeting, to get more insights and opinions about what the topics could be and what people want to hear. I'm really looking forward to it as a means to build a local network, so I signed myself up as a speaker of the first meet-up.

If you are in the Peninsula, South Bay, East Bay, etc., please send some encouragements to him by posting a comment, or better yet, come to the kick-off meeting.

Categories: Open Source

Have 30 seconds to find out how users experience your site and what you need to do to fix it now?

HP LoadRunner and Performance Center Blog - Sat, 07/25/2015 - 00:25

HP F1 Car_513x289_CB_opt.jpgThere is a new way to get quality results quickly on how your web page is performing. All it takes is 30 seconds of your time, and you get a 20+ page results report.

 

In this report, you will see how your site performs and what you can do now, so it goes at least 40 percent faster.

 

Keep reading to get your results now!

 

Categories: Companies

JUC U.S. East slides and video are now available online

Slides and video from JUC U.S. East are now available online!

If you attended the conference, THANK YOU, and I'm sure you had fun, learned a lot and met many people from the Jenkins community. Now you can revisit your favorite talks or "attend" the ones that you missed.

If you were unable to attend JUC U.S. East, you now have the slides and video so you can "attend" anyways! If you like what you see and would like to attend a JUC this year, there is ONE date left in the 2015 Jenkins User Conference World Tour: JUC U.S. West is September 2-3 in Santa Clara, CA. Register here.

Categories: Open Source

STARWEST Contest Giveaway

uTest - Fri, 07/24/2015 - 22:31

Coming up in September, the much talked about STARWEST conference will be taking place in sunny Anaheim CA. For this event, uTest decided to team up with Techwell to offer our audience a chance to win a FREE trip to the STARWEST conference. The grand prize is valued at over $5,000 including tickets, hotel, food, and […]

The post STARWEST Contest Giveaway appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Apps for All: The Challenge in Providing Accessibility

uTest - Fri, 07/24/2015 - 16:57

Recently, NYC black car company Gett made headlines when they updated their app to provide greater accessibility for blind and visually-impaired riders. This move was seen as a way to differentiate themselves from Uber, which has come under criticism for not making their app accessible and for denying service to passengers with guide animals. As a […]

The post Apps for All: The Challenge in Providing Accessibility appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Integrating Kubernetes and Jenkins

Kubernetes is an open-source project by Google that provides a platform for managing Docker containers as a cluster. In their own words:

Kubernetes is an open source orchestration system for Docker containers. It handles scheduling onto nodes in a compute cluster and actively manages workloads to ensure that their state matches the users declared intentions. Using the concepts of "labels" and "pods", it groups the containers which make up an application into logical units for easy management and discovery.

Kubernetes-related services by Google are the Google Container Engine, a Kubernetes-powered platform for hosting and managing Docker containers, and the Google Container Registry, a private Docker image registry.

Several new Jenkins plugins allow you to make use of Kubernetes and these services:

Watch Kohsuke demoing Jenkins/Kubernetes integration at OSCON earlier this week.

For a more in-depth look at how you can use Kubernetes with Jenkins, check out these posts on the CloudBees blog by Tracy Kennedy:

Categories: Open Source

SonarLint brings SonarQube rules to Visual Studio

Sonar - Fri, 07/24/2015 - 14:33

We are happy to announce the release of SonarLint for Visual Studio version 1.0. SonarLint is a Visual Studio 2015 extension that provides on-the-fly feedback to developers on any new bug or quality issue injected into C# code. The extension is based on and benefits from the .NET Compiler Platform (“Roslyn”) and its code analysis API to provide a fully-integrated user experience in Visual Studio 2015.

Features

There are lots of great rules in the tool. We won’t list all 76 of the rules we’ve implemented so far, but here are a couple that show what you can expect from the product:

  • Defensive programming is a good practise, but in some cases you shouldn’t simply check whether an argument is null or not. For example, value types (such as structs) can never be null, and as a consequence comparing a non-restricted generic type parameter to null might not make sense (S2955), because it will always return false for structs.
  • Did you know that a static field of a generic class is not shared among instances of different close-constructed types (S2743)? So how many instances of DefaultInnerComparer do you think will be created with the following class? It is static so you might have guessed one, but actually there will be an instance for each type parameter used for instantiating the class.
  • We’ve been using SonarLint internally for a while now, and are running it against a few open source libraries too. We’ve already found bugs in both Roslyn and Nuget with the rule “Identical expressions used on both sides of a binary operator” rule (S1764).
  • Also, as shown below, some cases of null pointer dereferencing can be detected as well (S1697):

This is just a small selection of the implemented rules. To find out more, go and check out the product.

How to get it?

SonarLint is packaged in two ways:

  • Visual Studio Extension
  • Nuget package

To install the Visual Studio Extension download the VSIX file from Visual Studio Gallery. Optionally, you can download the complete source code and build the extension for yourself. Oh, and you might have already realized: this product is open source (under LGPLv3 license), so you can contribute if you’d like.

By the way, internally the SonarQube C# plugin also uses the same code analyzers, so if you are already using the SonarQube platform for C# projects, from now on you can also get the issues directly in the IDE.

What’s next?

In the following months we’ll increase the number of supported rules, and as with all our SonarQube plugins, we are moving towards bug-detection rules. Next to this effort, we’re continuously adding code fixes to the Visual Studio Extension. That way, the issues identified by the tool can be automatically fixed inside Visual Studio. In the longer run, we aim to bring the same analyzers we’ve implemented for C# to VB.Net as well. Updates are coming frequently, so keep an eye on the Visual Studio Extension Update window.

This SonarLint for Visual Studio is one piece of this puzzle we’ve been working on since the beginning of the year: providing to the .Net community a tight, easy and native integration of the SonarQube ecosystem into the Microsoft ALM suite. This 1.0 release of SonarLint is a good opportunity to warmly thanks again Jean-Marc Prieur, Duncan Pocklington and Bogdan Gavril from Microsoft. They have been highly and daily contributing to this effort to make SonarQube a central piece of any .Net development environment.

For more information on the product go to http://vs.sonarlint.org or follow us on Twitter.

Categories: Open Source

Unlocking Critical SAP Performance Insight

SAP performance issues can be extremely complex and painful – for users, for administrators, and for IT teams alike. My colleagues and I know this first-hand as our experience as Dynatrace Guardian Consultants gives us unique insight into some rather difficult performance challenges. The seemingly simple question – “Why are users experiencing poor performance?” – […]

The post Unlocking Critical SAP Performance Insight appeared first on Dynatrace APM Blog.

Categories: Companies

Way Back Then: The Technology of 1995

The Seapine View - Fri, 07/24/2015 - 01:00

20YearGraphic_300

Seapine’s 20th anniversary made me realize how much things have changed since 1995. I started my first career job that year, working for a mid-sized publisher that had one email address for the entire company—and it was through America Online.

I honestly can’t remember if the publishing company had a website when I started. The World Wide Web was only two years old—just a toddler!—and web pages usually looked like this.

Because I started with the company in September, my desktop computer had the just-released Windows 95 installed. There was no network, though, so to print anything, I had to save it to a 3.5″ floppy disk and walk it down to the one computer that was connected to a printer. There were no Fitbits, of course, but I guarantee I got my daily quota of steps in, thanks to that “sneakernet.”

The trip down Memory Lane made me wonder about the other ways technology has changed since 1995. For those of you who weren’t around in 1995 (or who, like me, have a hard time remembering it), here’s a look back.

Computers

Compared to today’s machines, the PCs of 1995 were enormous, ugly blocks of steel, plastic, and glass. You could herniate yourself just lifting the monitor!

My machine was the HP Pavilion:

 HP)“Let’s make the monitor even heavier by attaching speakers to it!” (credit: HP)

This bad boy came with a 3.5″ floppy drive and a CD-ROM drive. Yes, CD-ROMs were catching on as we entered the multimedia age, but you still couldn’t write to them on your average PC, so you had to save your work to a floppy. (That September, HP released the first recordable compact disc drive under a grand.) Wondering how much power and memory it had? Here’s the stats, direct from HP:

The HP Pavilion 5030 was HP’s first multimedia PC designed specifically for the home market, and it went on to become a market leader in consumer PCs. It featured a quad-speed CD-ROM drive, Altec Lansing speakers, software for online service access and Microsoft Windows 95. This entry-level model features an Intel Pentium 75MHz processor, 8MB RAM and an 850MB hard drive.

Yes, we had laptops, too. Toward the top of the line was the Toshiba Satellite, one of the first laptops to come with a built-in CD-ROM drive. The floppy drive, however, was external.

 MCbx Old Computer Collection)This svelte beauty weighed a mere 6.9 pounds. (credit: MCbx Old Computer Collection)

The Satellite had 100 MHz processor, 4 MB of RAM (expandable to 28 MB), a 500 MB hard drive, a double-speed CD-ROM drive, and a lush 256-color VGA LCD screen. And it weighed less than seven pounds!

But these are both Windows machines, you say. Where were the Apple computers? Well, 1995 was toward the end of the Jobs-less Times for Apple. The company was struggling to compete with a host of Windows machines and finding little adoption. But they did release several computers that year, including the Power Macintosh 9500:

You did know that "Mac" is short for "Macintosh," right? (credit: Alexander Schaelss)You did know that “Mac” is short for “Macintosh,” right? (credit: Alexander Schaelss)

They also offered a few laptops, including the PowerBook 5300.

 Serged)This ain’t your father’s laptop. No, wait, maybe it is. (credit: Serged)

So what did we do on these primitive machines? Surfed the ‘net, of course.

The Internet

The Internet had been popular since the late 80s, but most of its use was for email and bulletin board services (BBS)—text-only communities that were the precursors to web forums. Although the World Wide Web had been around for two years, it wasn’t until 1995 that HTML 2.0, the first formal HTML standard, was published. It was also the year the National Science Foundation dismantled NSFnet and replaced it with a commercial Internet backbone.

How did we access the Internet? There were no cable or fiber optic lines coming into our homes for data. We had to dial in on a landline from our homes, using a modem that plugged into the telephone jack. In 1995, the 28.8 kilobits per second (Kbps) modems hit the market, but most of us were still using 14.4 Kbps modems. No, not gigabits or even megabits—kilobits.

For comparison, the iPhone 6’s WiFi speed can be as fast as 100 megabits per second (Mbps). Keep that in mind when you complain about how slow your mobile data is, Sonny Jim.

And if someone else picked up another phone in the house while we were on dial-up, we got kicked off. The same thing would happen if we forgot to turn off call waiting and someone tried to call while we were online.

Once online, we booted up either Netscape Navigator, Mosaic, or the new browser that launched in 1995, Internet Explorer.

Internet Explorer 2.0Internet Explorer 2.0 can’t handle exploring today’s Internet. (credit: Microsoft)

New search engines seemed to pop up everyday, but the most popular were WebCrawler, Lycos, and Infoseek. That’s right—Google wasn’t around yet. Larry Page and Sergey Brin began developing a search engine called BackRub with PageRank in 1995, but it wouldn’t evolve into Google for another year.

So where did we go on the World Wide Web in 1995? Well, there was Yahoo.com and eBay.com, both of which launched that year. Oh, and this brand new place to buy books called Amazon.com. And yes, it only sold books in 1995. And it looked like this:

The World Wide Web was very gray back then. (credit: Business Insider)

Yes, we could travel the world on the new World Wide Web. We just couldn’t travel it on our phones.

Mobile Phones

Mobile phone in 1995 were pretty terrible, but we thought they were “bodacious.” (Yes, that is actually a thing we said in the 90s.)

They’d been available for about 10 years by then, but were nowhere near as omnipresent as they are today. Only 23 percent of Americans owned cellular phones in 1995! There were no smartphones, either; you could use your mobile phone to call people and—to a much lesser extent—text them. Forget surfing the Web on your phone; that was more than a decade away.

In “A Brief History of Text Messaging,” Mashable writer Christine Erikson noted, “The average American user sent 0.4 texts per month in 1995.” Part of the reason may have been because 1995’s mobile phones had no keyboards or predictive text. Like a caveman trying to start a fire with two rocks, you had to mash a key multiple times to get the letter you wanted. This was called “multi-tap texting,” and it was awful.

1995’s phones didn’t have cameras in them, either. Which means—brace yourselves, kids—there were no selfies. And the phones were big, ugly plastic bricks. Most of them looked like this:

2110iUgh. (credit: Nokia)

It was a dark time, indeed. How many bar fights began because no one could Google the actual lyrics to “Scatman“? Too many …

Digital Cameras

Not only did mobile phones not have cameras in them, digital cameras themselves had barely crawled out of the primordial ooze in 1995. Most of us were still taking snapshots on 110 film and having them developed at the local Fotomat. The only digital cameras I recall were the Kodak DC40 and the Apple QuickTake 100, but the Internet tells me there were others.

 www.digicamhistory.com)Behold, the 0.4 megapixel Kodak DC 40. (credit: www.digicamhistory.com)

Regardless, the images were small, the cameras had no zoom or ability to change focus, and you couldn’t even see your photos until you downloaded them to your computer. Oh, and they cost around a grand. Even Polaroids were better than these clunky pieces of junk.

Something else that debuted in 1995: digital video. JVC, Sony, and other video camera manufacturers agreed on the DV format that year, which quickly became the standard for home video, independent filmmaking, and ruining family vacations. The sleekest of the DV offerings was the JVC GR-DV1:

"Can you put that damn thing down for ten seconds?" (credit: mickyh2011)“Can you put that damn thing down for ten seconds?” (credit: mickyh2011)

Hard to believe all of this—computer, modem, camera, video camera, phone—is now in one device that fits in our pocket.

Other Firsts

1995 had some other technology firsts, and I would be remiss not to mention them.

  • 1995 was the year IEEE1394, a.k.a Firewire, was introduced as a new standard for connecting devices. A successor to SCSI (pronounced “scuzzy”), Firewire’s fast data transfer speeds made it well suited for digital camcorders and hard drives.
  • Iomega debuted its high-capacity “Jaz” and “Zip” drives. Anyone remember the Zip Disk?
 Internetguide)No, it’s not just a big floppy disk. Really. (credit: Internetguide)
  • On December 5, 1995, IBM unveiled Deep Blue, a parallel computing system that would later beat world chess champion Garry Kasparov to become the first computer system to defeat a reigning world champion in a match under standard chess tournament time controls.
  • Remember Microsoft Bob? Neither do I, but apparently it launched in January of 1995.
  • The first E3 conference was held that year—in Las Vegas, naturally.
  • Toy Story, the first completely computer-generated movie, was released in November. And we would never look at our old toys the same again.

There were plenty more notable events, but this blog post has grown too long already. Over the next year, I’ll take a look back at coding, software testing, and other ways the industry’s changed since 1995. Until then, I’ll leave you with this:

The post Way Back Then: The Technology of 1995 appeared first on Blog.

Categories: Companies

If working on Microsoft Edge with me is something you could get excited about then read on

Rico Mariani's Performance Tidbits - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 23:45

This link has the details.

https://careers.microsoft.com/jobdetails.aspx?ss=&pg=0&so=&rw=1&jid=182730&jlang=EN&pp=SS

Categories: Blogs

[Webinar] Managing Continuous Delivery of Mobile Apps – for the Enterprise

Sauce Labs - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 17:59

Today, almost all organizations have mobile apps and for some, the mobile app is their only way of interacting with customers. With this increasing emphasis on mobile, the pressure to routinely update mobile apps means embracing Continuous Integration (CI) and Continuous Delivery (CD) methodologies.

Enabling CI / CD in your mobile development process means understanding the different solutions, overcoming unique challenges and ensuring the right ownership of the processes. In this webinar, join Harshal Vora from InfoStretch and Abhijit Pendyal from Sauce Labs to learn the steps required to enable Continuous Delivery of Mobile Application Platforms.

This webinar will cover:

  • Value of CI/CD in Mobile Development
  • CI/CD Architecture for Mobile Application Platforms
  • CI/CD Case Study – Requirements, Challenges and End Results
  • Demo – Jenkins / Code Update / Build Mobile App / Run automated tests using Sauce Labs

Join us for this presentation next Wednesday, July 29 at 11am PDT/2pm EDT. There will be a Q&A with Harshal and Abhijit afterwards.

Click HERE to register today.

Want to learn more about making Continuous Integration (CI) a part of your mobile development process? Download this free white paper, “Why Continuous Integration Should be Part of Your Mobile Development Process“.

Categories: Companies

It’s Game Time- Testing Games for Mobile Devices

uTest - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 15:09

Gaming is a billion dollar industry with constant new efforts to capitalize on that. Gaming revolves around the consumers experience. In a previous blog post we discuss why testing gaming devices and the games for these devices is important. However, here I stress why mobile game testing is now also essential. The app store is filled with […]

The post It’s Game Time- Testing Games for Mobile Devices appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Clustering Jenkins with Kubernetes in the Google Container Engine

While we’ve already discussed how to use the Google Container Engine to host elastic Jenkins slaves, it is also possible to host the master itself in the Google Container Engine. Architecting Jenkins in this way lets Jenkins installations run more frictionlessly and reduces an administrator’s burden by taking advantage of the Google Container Engine’s container scheduling, health-checking, resource labeling, and automated resource management. Other administrative tasks, like container logging, can also be handled by the Container Engine and the Container Engine itself is a hosted service.

What is Kubernetes and the Google Container Engine?Kubernetes is an open-source project by Google which provides a platform for managing Docker containers as a cluster. Like Jenkins, Kubernetes’ orchestrating and primary node is known as the “master”, while the node which hosts the Docker containers is called a “minion”. “Pods” host containers/services should on the minions and are defined as JSON pod files.Source: http://blog.arungupta.me/

The Google Cloud Platform hosts the Google Container Engine, a Kubernetes-powered platform for hosting and managing Docker containers, as well as the Google Container Registry, a private Docker image registry hosted on the Google Cloud Platform.  The underlying Kubernetes architecture provisions  Docker containers quickly, while the Container Engine creates and manages your Kubernetes clusters.
Automating Jenkins server administrationGoogle Container Engine is a managed service that uses Kubernetes as its underlying container orchestration tool. Jenkins masters, slaves, and any containerized application running in the Container Engine will benefit from automatic health-checks and restarts of unhealthy containers. The how-to on setting up Jenkins masters in the Google Container Engine is outlined in full here.

The gist is that Jenkins master runs from a Docker image and is part of a Kubernetes Jenkins cluster. The master itself must have its own persistent storage where the $JENKINS_HOME with all of its credentials, plugins, and job/system configurations can be stored. This separation of master and $JENKINS_HOME into 2 locations allows the master to be fungible and therefore easily replaced should it go offline and need to be restarted by Kubernetes. The important “guts” that make a master unique all exist in the $JENKINS_HOME and can be mounted to the new master container on-demand. Kubernetes own load balancer then handles the re-routing of traffic from the dead container to the new one.The Jenkins master itself is defined as a Pod (raw JSON here). This where ports for slave/HTTP requests, the Docker image for the master, the persistent storage mount, and the resource label (“jenkins”) can all be configured.
The master will also need 2 services to run to ensure it can connect to its slaves and answer HTTP requests without needing the exact IP address of the linked containers:
  • service-http - defined as a JSON file in the linked repository, allows HTTP requests to be routed to the correct port (8080) in the Jenkins master container’s firewall.
  • service-slave - defined in the linked JSON file, allows slaves to connect to the Jenkins master over port 50000.


Where do I start?
  1. The Kubernetes plugin is an open-source plugin, so it is available for download from the open-source update center or packaged as part of the CloudBees Jenkins Platform.
  2. Instructions on how to set up a Jenkins master in the Google Container Engine are available on GitHub.
  3. The Google Container Engine offers a free trial.
  4. The Google Container Registry is a free service.
  5. Other plugins complement and enhance the ways Docker can be used with Jenkins. Read more about their uses cases in these blogs:
    1. Docker Build and Publish Plugin
    2. Docker Slaves with the CloudBees Jenkins Platform
    3. Jenkins Docker Workflow DSL
    4. Docker Traceability
    5. Docker Hub Trigger Plugin
    6. Docker Custom Build Environment plugin



Tracy Kennedy
Associate Product ManagerCloudBees 

Tracy Kennedy is an associate product manager for CloudBees and is based in Richmond. Read more about Tracy in her Meet the Bees blog post and follow her on Twitter.
Categories: Companies

On-demand Jenkins slaves with Kubernetes and the Google Container Engine

In a previous series of blogs, we covered how to use Docker with Jenkins to achieve true continuous delivery and improve existing pipelines in Jenkins.

The CloudBees team and the Jenkins community have now also created the Kubernetes plugin, allowing Jenkins slaves to be built as Docker images and run in Docker hosts managed by Kubernetes, either on the Google Cloud Platform or on a more local Kubernetes instance. These elastic slaves are then brought online as Jenkins schedules jobs for them and destroyed after their builds are complete, ensuring masters have steady access to clean workspaces and minimizing builds’ resource footprint.
What is Kubernetes and the Google Container Engine?Kubernetes is an open-source project by Google which provides a platform for managing Docker containers as a cluster. Like Jenkins, Kubernetes’ orchestrating and primary node is known as the “master”, while the node which hosts the Docker containers is called a “minion”. “Pods” host containers/services should on the minions and are defined as JSON pod files.Source: http://blog.arungupta.me/

The Google Cloud Platform hosts the Google Container Engine, a Kubernetes-powered platform for hosting and managing Docker containers, as well as the Google Container Registry, a private Docker image registry hosted on the Google Cloud Platform.  The underlying Kubernetes architecture provisions  Docker containers quickly, while the Container Engine creates and manages your Kubernetes clusters.
Elastic, custom, and clean: Kubernetes slavesAs the demand on a Jenkins master increases, often so too do the build resources required. Many organizations architect for this projected growth by ensuring that their build/test environments are fungible, and therefore easily replaced and templated (e.g. as Docker images). Such fungibility makes slave resources highly scalable and resilient should some go offline or new ones need to be created quickly or automatically.

Kubernetes allows Jenkins installations to leverage any of their Docker slave images as templates for on-demand slave instances, which Jenkins can ask Kubernetes to launch as needed. The Kubernetes plugin now supports launching these slaves in any Kubernetes instance, including the Google Cloud Platform’s Container Engine.

Once a Kubernetes Pod running the slave container is deployed, the Jenkins jobs requesting that specific slave via traditional labels are built inside the Pod’s slave container. Kubernetes then brings the slave’s Pod offline after its build completes.

Where do I start?
  1. The Kubernetes plugin is an open-source plugin, so it is available for download from the open-source update center or packaged as part of the CloudBees Jenkins Platform.
  2. The Google Container Engine offers a free trial.
  3. The Google Container Registry is a free service.
  4. Other plugins complement and enhance the ways Docker can be used with Jenkins. Read more about their uses cases in these blogs:
    1. Docker Build and Publish Plugin
    2. Docker Slaves with the CloudBees Jenkins Platform
    3. Jenkins Docker Workflow DSL
    4. Docker Traceability
    5. Docker Hub Trigger Plugin
    6. Docker Custom Build Environment plugin



Tracy Kennedy
Associate Product ManagerCloudBees 

Tracy Kennedy is an associate product manager for CloudBees and is based in Richmond. Read more about Tracy in her Meet the Bees blog post and follow her on Twitter.
Categories: Companies

Office hours are back

After several months of inactivity, office hours, the bi-weekly meeting of Jenkins users and developers to learn more about Jenkins, are back.

I'll host the first session next Wednesday at 11 am PDT. This session will be about Stapler, focusing on what Jenkins plugin authors need to know about it, e.g. request routing, form submission handling, or how Jelly/Groovy views work.

While this is going to be a developer-focused session, future session topics will also have Jenkins users as target audience.

For general information on office hours, and how to join, see the wiki.

Categories: Open Source

How to use performance intelligence to deliver better retail banking experiences

Banks today are investing heavily in transformation projects to make it convenient for their customers to do business with them, anytime, anywhere, anyhow. While making the transition from the early days of retail IT banking systems to the current multi-channel digital environment, banks are also making vehement efforts to address the challenges brought about by […]

The post How to use performance intelligence to deliver better retail banking experiences appeared first on Dynatrace APM Blog.

Categories: Companies

Vector Software Integrates With AdaCore’s CodePeer 3.0

Software Testing Magazine - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 17:46
Vector Software, a provider of innovative software solutions for embedded software quality, has announced an integration of the VectorCAST test automation platform with CodePeer 3.0, the AdaCore’s advanced static code analysis tool for Ada, including version 2012. VectorCAST and CodePeer now provide Development and QA teams with the ability to focus test efforts in areas most susceptible to errors. An additional capability allows developers of legacy applications the ability to augment code covered during unit/integration and system test with code considered “clean” by CodePeer. Clean code can be imported into the ...
Categories: Communities

Turing Robotic’s New Phone: Unbreakable, Unhackable

uTest - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 17:37

Every once and a while, a new phone is released that pushes things a little further. While the iPhone has been the trend-setter and most commercially successful iteration of the modern smartphone, Turing Robotics is looking to take the lead moving forward. Turing has been working on an unbreakable and unhackable phone with completely customize-able software. […]

The post Turing Robotic’s New Phone: Unbreakable, Unhackable appeared first on Software Testing Blog.

Categories: Companies

Jenkins Container Support Juggernaut Arrives at Kubernetes, Google Container Registry

TL; DR: Jenkins now publishes Docker containers to Google Container Registry. Use Kubernetes to run isolated containers as slaves in Jenkins.

Last month, I wrote about exciting news with Jenkins namely its support for Docker. This month, I am happy to announce that Jenkins continues on its march for container technology support by providing support for Kubernetes.Overview of all technology components in this blog:
Kubernetes
Kubernetes is a system to help manage a cluster of Linux containers as a single system. Kubernetes is an open source project that was started by Google and now supported by various companies such Red Hat, IBM and others.

Kubernetes and DockerAs teams graduate beyond simple use cases with Docker, they realise that containers are not really meant to be deployed as a single unit.The next question is, how to do you start these containers across multiple hosts, how can these containers be grouped together and treated as a single unit of deployment? This is the use case that Kubernetes solves.

Google Container RegistryThe container registry is a service by Google to securely host, share and manager private container repositories and is part of the Google Container Engine service.
Interplay of these technology pieces
Kubernetes, Google Container Registry, Docker and JenkinsWhile Kubernetes focusses on the deployment side of Docker, Jenkins focuses the entire lifecycle of moving your docker containers from development to production. If a team builds a CD pipeline, the pipeline is managed through Jenkins which moves the containers through the pipeline (Dev->QA->Prod) and the containers finally deployed using Kubernetes. Thus, the four technologies make for a powerful combination for building CD pipelines.

Kubernetes and Jenkins announcementWith Docker, I talked about 2 meta-use cases  
  • Building CD pipelines with Docker and 
  • Using Docker containers as Jenkins slaves.



Today, the Jenkins community brings both stories to the Kubernetes.

Use case 1: Building CD pipelines with Google Container RegistryThe first use case enables teams to work with Google Container Registry (GCR). The community has taken the Docker Build and Publish plugin and extended it so that builds can publish containers to GCR. Details on this blog.

Use case 2: First class support for Jenkins WorkflowJenkins Workflow is fast becoming the standard way to build real world pipelines with Jenkins. Build managers can use the Workflow DSL to build these pipelines The community has provided support for Kubernetes by adding a kubernetes DSL that launches a build within a Kubernetes cluster.

Use case 3: Running docker containers as Jenkins slaves through KubernetesOne of the common issues in Jenkins is isolating slaves. Today, if an errant build contaminates the build machine, it may impact downstream builds. If these slaves are running as Docker containers, any “leakages” from previous builds is eliminated. With the Kubernetes plugin and Docker Custom Build Environment plugin, Jenkins can get a build slave from Kubernetes and run builds within the containers.

What’s Next?The CloudBees and Google teams have collaborated on these plugins and you can expect to see more efforts to support more use cases between Jenkins and Kubernetes. Some of these use cases, involve piggy-backing on the Docker support released by the community (for example Docker Traceability and Docker Notifications plugin).
If you are a developer and want to contribute to this effort reach out on the Jenkins developer alias (hint talk to Nicolas DeLoof ;-))

Closing Thoughts:The OSS community has innovated in the last couple of months, they have quickly added support for Docker and Kubernetes and have established Jenkins as the premier way to build modern real world continuous delivery pipelines.
I hope you have fun playing with all the goodies just released.

Where do I start?





Harpreet SinghVice President of Product Management 
CloudBees

Harpreet is the Vice President of Product Management and is based out of San Jose. Follow Harpreet on Twitter
Categories: Companies

Testing Your Android Application

Testing TV - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 16:38
Everybody knows testing is important, so let’s focus on test-driven development, testing best practices and the most useful Android testing libraries in our quest to improve the user experience and developer happiness. In this talk you’ll get an overview of how several types of testing (unit, integration, UI testing) fit into an Android project. The […]
Categories: Blogs

Knowledge Sharing

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