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HtmlTags 4.1 Released for ASP.NET 4 and ASP.NET Core

Jimmy Bogard - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 20:20

One of the libraries that I use on most projects (but probably don’t talk about it much) is now updated for the latest ASP.NET Core MVC. In order to do so, I broke out the classic ASP.NET and ASP.NET Core pieces into separate NuGet packages:

Since ASP.NET Core supports DI from the start, it’s quite a bit easier to integrate HtmlTags into your ASP.NET Core application. To enable HtmlTags, you can call AddHtmlTags in the method used to configure services in your startup (typically where you’d have the AddMvc method):

services.AddHtmlTags(reg =>
{
    reg.Labels.IfPropertyIs<bool>()
       .ModifyWith(er => er.CurrentTag.Text(er.CurrentTag.Text() + "?"));
});

The AddHtmlTags method takes a configuration callback, a params array of HtmlConventionRegistry objects, or an entire HtmlConventionLibrary. The one with the configuration callback includes some sensible defaults, meaning you can pretty much immediately use it in your views.

The HtmlTags.AspNetCore package includes extensions directly for IHtmlHelper, so you can use it in your Razor views quite easily:

@Html.Label(m => m.FirstName)
@Html.Input(m => m.FirstName)
@Html.Tag(m => m.FirstName, "Validator")

@Html.Display(m => m.Title)

Since I’m hooked in to the DI pipeline, you can make tag builders that pull in a DbContext and populate a list of radio buttons or drop down items from a table (for example). And since it’s all object-based, your tag conventions are easily testable, unlike the tag helpers which are solely string based.

Enjoy!

Categories: Blogs

How to Video Training: Open Source Component Management and Intelligence

Sonatype Blog - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 18:01
As a developer I am constantly chasing new tools and enjoy learning new things. I read a lot of blog posts, tutorials and documentation. And I listen to podcasts and attend webinars as well. More and more I find that watching videos of conference and webinar presentations is great.  But even...

To read more, visit our blog at www.sonatype.org/nexus.
Categories: Companies

5 ways to make load testing work for you

HP LoadRunner and Performance Center Blog - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 18:00

Load testing is a type of software testing used to examine the behavior of a system when subjected to both normal and extreme expected load conditions.

Continue reading to discover five ways that you can simulate realistic load testing of your system, mitigate your risks, and create reliable, continuous and automated performance testing for a better and more efficient end user experience.

Categories: Companies

5 Questions for a US Army Soldier and Performance Built-In

HP LoadRunner and Performance Center Blog - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 17:41

 

AaronDeCapua_CH47-Ramp.jpg

This blog has 5 questions and answers with a US Army Public Affairs Officer who is stationed at Camp Buehring in Kuwait. He shares a perspective on how Performance Engineering is critical on the modern battlefield, and how dependency on networks is crucial, showing some of the ways soldiers experience this today. Click to learn more, and a short video on DCGS-A.

Categories: Companies

The ChatOps Approach to Software Delivery

Dynatrace Synthetic Monitoring runs tests against a web application and provides users with information on application performance and availability. This includes alerts whenever performance or availability go below defined thresholds. However, the process by which alerts are received, evaluated, and diagnosed is changing rapidly. Some of this change is driven by our new Retry on […]

The post The ChatOps Approach to Software Delivery appeared first on about:performance.

Categories: Companies

Testing Talk Interview Series- Sauce Labs

PractiTest - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 16:00
Testing Talks logo

Sauce labs logo

Sauce Labs is the leading cloud-based web and mobile application automated testing platform. Its secure and reliable testing infrastructure enables users to run functional tests written with Selenium and Appium, eliminating the time and expense of maintaining a in-house test grid.

1. Please tell us about yourself. Try naming two interesting things not everyone knows about you.

I am Charles Ramsey, CEO of Sauce Labs and today with me Lubos Parobek, Vice President of Product at Sauce Labs. I joined the company in February 2015. I took this opportunity because I believed in what Sauce Labs was doing, both in terms of leveraging open source software, and the tremendous opportunity to transform how dev teams test their web and mobile apps.

As for something not everyone knows I am a reader. I’m currently reading The Story of Civilization by Will Durant, which is the first book in a series of 11. And, if it were up to me, I’d rather be surfing.

2.  Can you please tell us a little about your Organization? How are you different and what makes you great?

Sauce Labs has been working on automated functional testing exclusively for seven years. Maintaining a cloud-based infrastructure for enterprises to test across hundreds of operating systems, browsers and devices combinations in the market is not easy.  The challenges associated with what we do, both on web and mobile, are real and significant. It’s no wonder that our customers prefer not to do this on their own.! The outcome of all of that effort and time is that we are able to handle about 1,300,000 tests a day on our own infrastructure with our own software. So our customers can test with extremely high velocity, availability, security and the ability to do both automated web app and mobile simulation and emulation. This is one of the categories that makes us unique and differentiated for our customers.

Even though we are increasingly selling to enterprise customers’, there is still a strong allegiance between Sauce and the development community. Individual developers and small teams prefer Sauce because we were built on open source frameworks such as Appium and Selenium and we make something that used to be considered a necessary evil–testing–fun for developers.

We are up to 125 employees and we have grown quickly over the last year. When I joined the company there were approximately 55 employees.

3. If I am not using your solution today, what are the top three things I am missing out?

If you are not using Sauce Labs and do not have an internal Selenium grid, it means that you are probably still doing Waterfall development. Mid-size and enterprise companies are moving from Waterfall development methodologies to Agile. After they turn to Agile, continuous integration and continuous delivery, they recognize the criticality of automating their functional tests using Selenium. Traditional manual testing methods cannot keep the pace with a continuous integration and continuous delivery shop. Once a dev team gets up to speed on Selenium and they realize the effort required to maintain an internal grid, they start investigating alternatives and that’s typically when they find Sauce Labs.

The other two items we should highlight are scalability and security. If we take into consideration velocity, it is not only the ability to test rapidly, but it is the ability to rapidly change the kinds of tests that you are running. For example some of our customers who are very significant testers move masses of work from PC to Mac, and we are probably the only vendor that is able to handle that kind of volume. It is important to recognize that we don’t use AWS or any other cloud provider; Sauce has its own cloud, offering speed, security and scalability. Our own infrastructure is the service provider that allows our customers to build custom parallel testing environments on the fly, to run tests, and to get very detailed results.

Lubos Parobek, VP of Products: One of the key things we offer is complete functional testing. We support desktop operating systems, browsers and mobile. You need to try Sauce Labs to realize how much additional coverage you can get, how fast you can test many things in parallel, and you can scale hundreds of new tests through our service.

4.  How do you see the testing and development ecosystems evolving in 3 or 5 years from now?

If you think about what Amazon, Apple, and others are doing voice recognition, the whole notion of using a keyboard, whether we are on multiple devices or on a laptop, is going to change dramatically. For example, the next two years the input from voice is going to be a requirement. Everything will have code and, lucky for us, that code will need to be tested.

The post Testing Talk Interview Series- Sauce Labs appeared first on QA Intelligence.

Categories: Companies

Open Source Database Testing Tools

Software Testing Magazine - Mon, 07/18/2016 - 14:00
Database testing is one of the areas that might have the smaller number of open source tools. The programming languages have many xUnit tools and mocking frameworks, but this is not the case for databases. This article provides a list of open source tools that can be used to perform unit, load and security testing on several relational and NoSQL databases. This situation might be the results of the fact that most of the main relational databases are commercial tools that come with an infrastructure already provided by the vendors. The current rise of the NoSQL databases and the many forks that have been created from the original MySQL open source relational database might however change this situation in the future. The tools covered in this article are Database Benchmark, DbUnit, DB Test Driven, HammerDB, NoSQLMap, NoSQLUnit, SeLite, sqlmap and tSQLt. Updates July 18 2016: added JdbcSlim, ruby-plsql-spec, Tsung, utPLSQL December 1 2016: added SeLite Database Benchmark Database Benchmark is an open source .NET tool designed to stress test databases with large data flows. The application performs two main test scenarios: the insertion of large amount of randomly generated records with sequential or random keys and the read of the inserted records, ordered by their keys. It features advanced data generators, graphic visualization and powerful reporting options. Target databases: MySQL, SQL Server, PostgreSQL, MongoDB and many others Web site: http://stssoft.com/products/database-benchmark/ DbFit DbFit is an open source database testing framework that supports easy test-driven development of your database code. DbFit is [...]
Categories: Communities

Sending Notifications in Pipeline

This is a guest post by Liam Newman, Technical Evangelist at Cloudbees. Rather than sitting and watching Jenkins for job status, I want Jenkins to send notifications when events occur. There are Jenkins plugins for Slack, HipChat, or even email among others. Note: Something is happening! I think we can all agree getting notified when events occur is preferable to having to constantly monitor them just in case. I’m going to continue from where I left off in my previous post with the hermann project. I added a Jenkins Pipeline with an HTML publisher for code coverage. This week, I’d like to make Jenkins to notify me when builds start and when...
Categories: Open Source

Sending Notifications in Pipeline

This is a guest post by Liam Newman, Technical Evangelist at Cloudbees. Rather than sitting and watching Jenkins for job status, I want Jenkins to send notifications when events occur. There are Jenkins plugins for Slack, HipChat, or even email among others. Note: Something is happening! I think we can all agree getting notified when events occur is preferable to having to constantly monitor them just in case. I’m going to continue from where I left off in my previous post with the hermann project. I added a Jenkins Pipeline with an HTML publisher for code coverage. This week, I’d like to make Jenkins to notify me when builds start and when...
Categories: Open Source

Utilizing the NV Insights report during the performance testing process

HP LoadRunner and Performance Center Blog - Sun, 07/17/2016 - 13:23

NV insights test runsteaser.png

In today’s world there is no question about the importance of load testing. But it is also important to consider how the application behaves under different network conditions, what is the user experience impact? Keep reading to discover how the NV Insights report can help you find this information.

Categories: Companies

Stop Using Office! Breaking the Barriers to Agile Adoption in Safety- and Quality-Critical Environments [Webinar]

The Seapine View - Fri, 07/15/2016 - 13:30

breaking_barriers-blog_300x200Is your organization reluctant to join the Agile revolution—perceiving significant and insurmountable barriers to adoption, despite the potential benefits?

Do you continue to use Microsoft Office—storing Word and Excel documents in a document management system to manage your R&D process?

If the answer to both of these questions is “Yes,” then Office is most likely your problem.

Join Gordon Alexander, Seapine Software solutions consultant, on Wednesday, July 27 to learn more about Breaking the Barriers to Agile Adoption. During this 45-minute webinar, you’ll learn:

  • Why you should stop using Office to manage development assets.
  • How an artifact-centric tool, like TestTrack, can help you break the barriers to Agile adoption.

Gordon will also demonstrate how to set up end-to-end traceability—from requirements specifications to user stories to tasks—using TestTrack and how this approach will allow you to manage change, and embrace Agile in a way that works for your organization, much more easily.

REGISTER NOW!

Categories: Companies

Pokémon Go to Agile Go

Pokémon Go is an augmented-reality game that recently launched in Australia, New Zealand, United States, Germany and a number of other countries. In a nutshell, you search for Pokemon in the Poké world in your actual, geographical location, which you can explore by physically walking around.
Allow me to introduce you to my newly invented game called Agile Go.  Like Pokémon Go, Agile Go is a reality based game in which you search for people within your “Agile World” (aka, your company) that are exhibiting Agile behaviors aligned with the Agile values and principles.  Take a picture of them and tag it with “Agile Go”.  In Pokémon Go, you capture pokemon.  In Agile Go, you capture the moment where people are exhibiting Agile behavior.  What Agile behaviors should you look for?  Here are some real time scenarios to look for:
  • Business and development collaborating together
  • Product Owner or Team welcoming change to requirements
  • Teams self-organizing around the work
  • Team or Product Owner demonstrating an iteration of work
  • Product Owner getting feedback from actual customers
  • Team member applying a secondary skills to help others 
  • Anyone applying face-to-face communication 
  • Team identifying work not needed during grooming 
  • Anyone completing an action for improvement 
  • Manager or anyone removing an impediment to progress
If you see someone exhibiting any of these Agile behaviors or others you deem as aligning with the Agile values and principles, take a picture of them, write the Agile behavior they are exhibiting, and tag it with the “Agile Go” logo (see below).  Then share the photograph with them, letting them know that you appreciate them exhibiting positive Agile behaviors! Even consider tweeting their picture with the #agilego hashtag.  Go Agile!

© Agile Go All rights reserved. Anyone may use the Agile Go logo for non profit and non revenue basis
Categories: Blogs

Recap: Automation Best Practices (Webinar)

Sauce Labs - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 23:26

Thanks to everyone who joined us for our recent webinar, “Automation Best Practices“, featuring Sauce Labs’ Automation Specialist Leo Laskin.

In this webinar, Leo discussed the value of open source resources in testing and also shared his personal experience in moving from manual to automated testing, the lessons he has learned, and the steps he took to build a powerful, international test coding army.

The presentation covered:

  • The good, bad and ugly when writing and testing code through automation
  • Challenges faced, including navigating around XPath and development best practices
  • Popular, key automation practices attendees can use to build their own coding armies

Interested in learning more about automated testing using Selenium? Download a free copy of Dave Haeffner’s Getting Started With Selenium.

Access the recording HERE and view the slides below: 

Automation Best Practices from Sauce Labs

Categories: Companies

Open letter to "CDT Test Automation" reviewers

Chris McMahon's Blog - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 16:23

To:

Tim Western
Alan Page
Keith Klain
Ben Simo
Paul Holland
Alan Richardson
Christin Wiedemann
Albert Gareev
Noah Sussman
Joseph Quaratella

Apropos of my criticism of "Context Driven Approach to Automation in Testing" (I reviewed version 1.04), I ask you to join me in condemning publicly both the tone and the substance of that paper.

If you do support the paper, I ask you to do so publicly.

And regardless of your view, I request that you ask the authors of the paper bearing your names to remove that paper from public view as well as to remove the copy that Keith Klain hosts here.  For the reasons I pointed out, this paper is an impediment to reasonable discussion and it has no place in the modern discourse about test automation.
Categories: Blogs

Keyword-Driven Test Automation with Ranorex

Ranorex - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 11:15

Multiple releases, limited resources, time pressure and a team with mixed skillsets. And it’s your task to create flexible, maintainable automated tests, which every team member can understand and work with. The solution: get a test automation tool that supports keyword-driven testing.

What is keyword-driven testing?

The keyword-driven testing approach separates the test automation implementation from the test case design. A keyword is defined for each action in the test case. Once the keyword is set, you don’t need any programming knowledge to easily design and maintain the automated tests.

What are the benefits of keyword-driven testing?
  • Tests are easily readable.
    As keyword-driven tests are technology-independent, they’re easily readable for non-technical testers. While technically experienced team members can prepare the automation process and define keywords, you don’t need any technical knowledge to design test cases with these keywords.
  • You can create flexible, easily maintainable tests faster.
    In keyword-driven testing, each action is automated only once and the corresponding keyword can be reused throughout several test cases.
How can I create keyword-driven tests with Ranorex?

There are two ways of creating keyword-driven tests with Ranorex:


1. Keyword-driven framework with automation modules

You can use both your recording and code modules in Ranorex Studio as a basis for keyword-driven testing. Simply split your automation modules and give them each a clearly understandable name. For example, you can define a set of actions, which start the system under test, as a module with the name “StartSUT”. You can find detailed information on how to do so in this user guide section.

Drag keyword from module browser for keyword driven test automation

These modules now function as keywords. Once the keywords are defined, you can drag and drop the keywords needed for your test directly from the module browser into your test suite.

Reuse keywords in multiple projects

Start by creating your keywords directly in a Ranorex test suite module library. You then use these keywords in multiple Ranorex projects by referencing back to this library. You can do so in two different ways:

  • Reference the Ranorex test suite module library. This enables you to still edit the keywords when needed.
  • Reference the DLL file of the Ranorex test suite module library. Please note that this approach doesn’t allow you to modify your keywords.

This approach completely separates the keyword implementation from the test case design and the keyword usage.

Separation in several projects for keyword-driven approach

If you want to learn more about organizing test automation projects, please read this blog post: “Organize a Test Automation Project with Ranorex“.

Use external data in keyword-driven tests

You can make your tests even more flexible by using variables. Variables enable you to automatically retrieve external data, which you’ve saved in an Excel or CVS sheet, in your tests – such as passwords for login actions. You can find detailed information on how to implement this type of testing in our user guide section “Data-Driven Testing“.

2. Keyword-driven testing using the action table

We bet you’re familiar with the good old Excel-spreadsheet. So why not use something you already know well in your automated tests? When using the action table in the Ranorex Recorder, you can create keyword-driven tests in a table-like workspace. It just takes a little trick to access your predefined keywords within this view: Inheritance.

Technically experienced team members can provide code-based keywords in a code module. You find detailed information on how to do so in this user guide section or this blog post.

Keyword Implementation

A recording module, which is inherited from a code module, automatically derives all functionalities from its parent module. This is also true for parameters – you can read more about this topic in the user guide section “User Code Actions and Parameters”.

This can be achieved with inheritance in the recording modules “UserCode.cs” file:

Inheritance From KeywordLibrary Module

Now, you can simply add a user code action in the action table (Add New Action -> User Code) and choose a predefined keyword. Once you’ve defined it, you can set the argument.

Keyword Driven Action Table

You can also use data-driven testing within the recording module by simply making the keyword parameters variable as explained in the user guide section “Data-Driven Testing“.

Conclusion

Keyword-driven test automation is a fantastic way to create flexible test cases. It enables teams with different technical background to work on test automation projects together, while keeping test clearly structured and easily maintainable.

Download Trial

The post Keyword-Driven Test Automation with Ranorex appeared first on Ranorex Blog.

Categories: Companies

Softec Asia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, September 6-8 2016

Software Testing Magazine - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 09:00
Softec Asia is a three-day event focused on software testing organized by the Malaysian Software Testing Board (MSTB) that takes place in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The conference features local and international software testing and software quality assurance experts. In the agenda of the Softec Asia conference you can find topics like “Measurement and Metrics for Test Managers”, “The Warrior Tester”, “Building a Robust Test Industry for the Future”, “Test Automation Pattern”, “The Emerging World of the IoT – What it is, and what it means for testing”, “Testing Business Mentoring”, “SQA, Testing and SCM – What are the differences”, “10 Common Attacks on the Test Manager”. Web site: http://www.qportal.com.my/softec/softecasia2016/ Location for the the Softec Asia conference: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Categories: Communities

Getting the Worm

Hiccupps - James Thomas - Thu, 07/14/2016 - 06:57
Will Self wrote about his writing in The Guardian recently:
When I’m working on a novel I type the initial draft first thing in the morning. Really: first thing ... I believe the dreaming and imagining faculties are closely related, such that wreathed in night-time visions I find it possible to suspend disbelief in the very act of making stuff up, which, in the cold light of day would seem utterly preposterous. I’ve always been a morning writer, and frankly I believe 99% of the difficulties novices experience are as a result of their unwillingness to do the same.I am known (and teased) at work for being up and doing stuff at the crack of dawn and, although I don't aim to wake up early, when it happens I do aim to take advantage. I really do like working (or blogging, or reading) at this time. I feel fresher, more creative, less distracted.

I wouldn't be as aggressive as Self is about others who don't graft along with the sunrise (but he's not alone; even at bedtime I don't have to look hard to find articles like Why Productive People Get Up Insanely Early) because, for me, there are any number of reasons why novice writers, or testers or managers, or others experience difficulties. And I doubt more conscientious attention to an alarm clock would help in most of those cases.

Also, it's known that people differ in chronotype. I came to terms with my larkness a long time ago and now rarely try to go against it by, say, working in the evenings.

How about you?
Image: https://flic.kr/p/4a3yKL
Categories: Blogs

New packages for Jenkins 2.7.1

We created new native packages for Jenkins 2.7.1 today. These replace the existing packages. Due to a release process issue, the packaging (RPM, etc.) was created the same way as Jenkins 1.x LTS, resulting in problems starting Jenkins on some platforms: While we dropped support for AJP in Jenkins 2.0, some 1.x packages had it enabled by default, resulting in an exception during startup. These new packages for Jenkins 2.7.1, dated July 14, have the same scripts and parameters as Jenkins 2.x and should allow starting up Jenkins without problems. If you notice any further problems with the packaging, please report...
Categories: Open Source

New packages for Jenkins 2.7.1

We created new native packages for Jenkins 2.7.1 today. These replace the existing packages. Due to a release process issue, the packaging (RPM, etc.) was created the same way as Jenkins 1.x LTS, resulting in problems starting Jenkins on some platforms: While we dropped support for AJP in Jenkins 2.0, some 1.x packages had it enabled by default, resulting in an exception during startup. These new packages for Jenkins 2.7.1, dated July 14, have the same scripts and parameters as Jenkins 2.x and should allow starting up Jenkins without problems. If you notice any further problems with the packaging, please report...
Categories: Open Source

Monitoring GO Applications with Dynatrace

Providing fast feedback is a key aspect of continuous integration, so kicking off a new build when changes are committed is a common practice in modern software development. One cool visualization of the current builds (trunk and latest sprint) are our Pipeline State UFOs, located around our development office to provide our engineers with fast […]

The post Monitoring GO Applications with Dynatrace appeared first on about:performance.

Categories: Companies

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