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Device Fragmentation in Mobile Games Testing

Testing TV - Wed, 01/25/2017 - 15:41
Device fragmentation is one of the biggest challenges in mobile software testing. When it comes to mobile games specifically, not supporting a few device models that are very popular in certain markets can lead to significant revenue losses. Thus, the typical approach of choosing a sample of devices to test your games on no longer […]
Categories: Blogs

The Nexus Firewall – Perimeter Defense for Software Development

Sonatype Blog - Wed, 01/25/2017 - 08:00
The quantitative research summarized below, covering over 7,000 repositories across nearly 100 countries, highlights some of the challenges with quality at modern development velocities. You can respond by leveraging automation in your repository manager to improve application quality and reduce...

To read more, visit our blog at www.sonatype.org/nexus.
Categories: Companies

Now On DevOps Radio: DevOps Institute Brings DevOps Knowledge to Worldwide Community

Jayne Groll (below) is CEO and co-founder of DevOps Institute, and an expert in IT training. She joins DevOps host, Andre Pino, to discuss how people can get training and certification in DevOps topics - and what exactly that means in an industry where there isn’t a single body of knowledge about DevOps.

Jane explains how a long time ago in a galaxy far away, when screens were still black and green, she was a paralegal manager tapped to provide education and support her company’s IT unit. Since then she has witnessed IT education and certification grow with new roles, competencies and skills, including DevOps.

Jane says for most developers the most difficult part of DevOps is starting the process. The DevOps Institute’s curriculum encompasses a collective body of knowledge including CD and CI, automation, principles of how to architect a DevOps pipeline, test communities, cultural management, DevSecOps (adding security to DevOps) and specific role-based competencies. By participating in this training and certification process, developers and operations teams can gain the skills needed for successful DevOps strategies, so that they can ultimately bring value back to the organization.

Finally, Jayne talks about DevOps Express – a consortium of leading vendors and practitioners in the DevOps space who are providing, collectively, best practices and a reference architecture for organizations trying to undergo a DevOps transformation. DevOps Institute is a founding member of DevOps Express, and Jayne joins with Andre in discussing the value of it for the DevOps community. Listen in to hear more!

Here’s your homework assignment: Catch up on DevOps Radio, available on the CloudBees website and on iTunes, and make note to check back for new episodes!

Want extra credit? Overachievers, make sure you follow @ITSM_Jayne and @CloudBees on Twitter, so you can share your thoughts on the latest episode. All you have to do is mention #DevOpsRadio in your post.

 

 

Categories: Companies

Open Source Android Testing Tools

Software Testing Magazine - Tue, 01/24/2017 - 10:00
The shift towards mobile platforms is a strong trend currently and Android is the most widely adopted mobile OS with an estimated market share above 80% in 2014. You should naturally test all the apps developed for Android and a large number of open source testing tools and test automation frameworks have been developed to achieve this goal. This article presents a list of open source Android testing tools. For each tool you will get a small description of its features and pointers to additional resources that discusses the tool more in details. Feel free to suggest any additional open source Android software testing framework or resource that you think might be included in this article. Tools are listed by alphabetical order. A list of open source projects that are not active is also included at the end of the article. The open source Android software testing tools mentioned in this article are: Android Test Kit, AndroidJUnit4, Appium, AssertJ Android, calabash-android, Magneto, Monkey, NativeDriver, Robolectric, RoboSpock, Robotium, UIAutomator, Selendroid, Test Butler Updates January 24 2017: removed MonkeyTalk (acquired by Oracle); added AssertJ Android, Magneto, Test Butler Android Test Kit The Android Test Kit is the set of Google open source testing tools for Android that include the Espresso API that you can use to write concise and reliable Android UI tests Web site: https://code.google.com/p/android-test-kit/ Additional resources * Android application testing with the Android test framework – Tutorial * Espresso for Android is here! AndroidJUnit4 AndroidJUnit4 is a framework that allows [...]
Categories: Communities

Software Test Professionals Conference Spring, Phoenix, USA, March 14-17 2017

Software Testing Magazine - Mon, 01/23/2017 - 15:00
The Software Test Professionals Conference is a software testing event that will give you the opportunity to improve your software testing technique; find the latest tools; discover emerging trends; develop new or improve existing processes; network and gather with other high-level professionals. In the agenda of the Software Test Professionals you can find topics like “Non-Functional Testing for Functional Testers”, “Pair Testing – The Secret Sauce of Agile Testing”, “Client-side Performance Testing”, “Jump Into JMeter”, “Storytelling – The Magical First Steps of Automated Testing”, “Advanced Test Automation Techniques for Responsive Apps and Sites”, “Putting Agile to the Test: A Case Study for Test Agility in a Large IT Project”, “Testing Metrics: Choose Wisely”, “The Build That Cried Broken – Building Trust in Your Continuous Integration Tests”, “40+ of the Best, Free Testing Tools in 60 Minutes”, “Metrics: Tell A Story, Not A Number”, “Getting Started with Selenium”, “Why You Need to Build UI/UX Testing Into Your Test Planning Immediately!”, “Expanding Your Mobile Test Offerings “, “Agile Testing – Practices That Deliver the Most Value”, “A Tester’s Guide to Collaborating with Product Owners”, “Hands-On with the BDD and Cucumber Test Automation”, “Collaborative Testing: Why We CAN Have Nice Things”. Web site: http://www.stpcon.com/ Location for the Software Test Professionals conference: The Renaissance Phoenix Downtown Hotel, 100 N 1st Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004
Categories: Communities

Now On DevOps Radio: DevOps Institute Brings DevOps Knowledge to Worldwide Community

Jayne Groll (below) is CEO and co-founder of DevOps Institute, and an expert in IT training. She joins DevOps host, Andre Pino, to discuss how people can get training and certification in DevOps topics - and what exactly that means in an industry where there isn’t a single body of knowledge about DevOps.

Jane explains how a long time ago in a galaxy far away, when screens were still black and green, she was a paralegal manager tapped to provide education and support her company’s IT unit. Since then she has witnessed IT education and certification grow with new roles, competencies and skills, including DevOps.

Jane says for most developers the most difficult part of DevOps is starting the process. The DevOps Institute’s curriculum encompasses a collective body of knowledge including CD and CI, automation, principles of how to architect a DevOps pipeline, test communities, cultural management, DevSecOps (adding security to DevOps) and specific role-based competencies. By participating in this training and certification process, developers and operations teams can gain the skills needed for successful DevOps strategies, so that they can ultimately bring value back to the organization.

Finally, Jayne talks about DevOps Express – a consortium of leading vendors and practitioners in the DevOps space who are providing, collectively, best practices and a reference architecture for organizations trying to undergo a DevOps transformation. DevOps Institute is a founding member of DevOps Express, and Jayne joins with Andre in discussing the value of it for the DevOps community. Listen in to hear more!

Here’s your homework assignment: Catch up on DevOps Radio, available on the CloudBees website and on iTunes, and make note to check back for new episodes!

Want extra credit? Overachievers, make sure you follow @ITSM_Jayne and @CloudBees on Twitter, so you can share your thoughts on the latest episode. All you have to do is mention #DevOpsRadio in your post.

 

 

Categories: Companies

Happy 10th Birthday Google Testing Blog!

Google Testing Blog - Sat, 01/21/2017 - 23:57
by Anthony Vallone

Ten years ago today, the first Google Testing Blog article was posted (official announcement 2 days later). Over the years, Google engineers have used this blog to help advance the test engineering discipline. We have shared information about our testing technologies, strategies, and theories; discussed what code quality really means; described how our teams are organized for optimal productivity; announced new tooling; and invited readers to speak at and attend the annual Google Test Automation Conference.

Google Testing Blog banner in 2007

The blog has enjoyed excellent readership. There have been over 10 million page views of the blog since it was created, and there are currently about 100 to 200 thousand views per month.

This blog is made possible by many Google engineers who have volunteered time to author and review content on a regular basis in the interest of sharing. Thank you to all the contributors and our readers!

Please leave a comment if you have a story to share about how this blog has helped you.

Categories: Blogs

Blue Ocean Dev Log: January Week #3

As we get closer to Blue Ocean 1.0, which is planned for the end of March, I have started highlighting some of the good stuff that has been going on, and this week was a very busy week. A new Blue Ocean beta (b18) was released with: Parametrized pipelines are now supported! i18n improvements Better support for matrix and the evil (yet somehow still used) Maven project type (don’t use it!) SSE fixes for IE and Edge browsers An alpha release of the Visual Editor for Jenkinsfiles on top of Declarative Pipeline has snuck into the "experimental" update center. Andrew will be talking about Declarative Pipelines at FOSDEM next week. Parametrized Pipelines You would know this...
Categories: Open Source

New In-Product, Upgrade Notifications with CloudBees Jenkins Platform 2.32.1.1

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of CloudBees Jenkins Platform 2.32.1, which offers upgrade notifications and many key improvements such as a bump on the Jenkins core to the 2.32.1 LTS line. You may know that Beekeeper Upgrade Assistant allows users to review and install upgrades of verified components, tested through the CloudBees Assurance Program (CAP). Up to now, this recommended configuration or envelope was only updated when new CloudBees Jenkins Platform releases were announced. Starting with this release, CloudBees can update the configuration between releases, so that fixes can be safely deployed, keeping the Jenkins instance safely in the recommended configuration. Another key improvement, is the LTS upgrade on the rolling release. This LTS bump provides the latest and greatest stable Jenkins core, fixes 50+ bug fixes since the previous LTS release, includes some performance improvements and, most importantly, upgrades the Jenkins Remoting Module from version 2.6 to 3.1. The Jenkins Remoting model is at the heart of all communications not only between Jenkins masters and agents but also between CloudBees Jenkins Operation Center and each client master.

To learn more, read the full blog post on Cloudbees Network (CBN). As the hub of all product related knowledge, CBN is where you will find release details and all future product announcements. 

 

Blog Categories: JenkinsDeveloper Zone
Categories: Companies

New In-Product, Upgrade Notifications with CloudBees Jenkins Platform 2.32.1.1

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of CloudBees Jenkins Platform 2.32.1, which offers upgrade notifications and many key improvements such as a bump on the Jenkins core to the 2.32.1 LTS line. You may know that Beekeeper Upgrade Assistant allows users to review and install upgrades of verified components, tested through the CloudBees Assurance Program (CAP). Up to now, this recommended configuration or envelope was only updated when new CloudBees Jenkins Platform releases were announced. Starting with this release, CloudBees can update the configuration between releases, so that fixes can be safely deployed, keeping the Jenkins instance safely in the recommended configuration. Another key improvement, is the LTS upgrade on the rolling release. This LTS bump provides the latest and greatest stable Jenkins core, fixes 50+ bug fixes since the previous LTS release, includes some performance improvements and, most importantly, upgrades the Jenkins Remoting Module from version 2.6 to 3.1. The Jenkins Remoting model is at the heart of all communications not only between Jenkins masters and agents but also between CloudBees Jenkins Operation Center and each client master.

To learn more, read the full blog post on Cloudbees Network (CBN). As the hub of all product related knowledge, CBN is where you will find release details and all future product announcements. 

 

Blog Categories: JenkinsDeveloper Zone
Categories: Companies

Top 3 reasons to join us at Perform 2017

We’re in the final weeks before our global Perform 2017 event, and I couldn’t be feeling more satisfied with where things stand!

And, as we work hard to finalize all the details, I find myself reflecting on best reasons for why you should join us in Las Vegas from 6-9 February:

1.) Main stage case studies are first rate

I’m particularly excited about the digital travel experience segment on Tuesday which features some pretty cool names in the travel industry –

Marriott and KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. Four brands in total deliver a connected story about how each one uses Dynatrace to improve the customer experience from check in at the airport, through to swiping in through the hotel door.

2.) We’re all focused on the future

This year’s agenda is all about how big business are pushing new boundaries in cloud migration and we have a fantastic line up of speakers, ready to share invaluable insights – think AWS, Adobe, Pivotal, Red Hat, Cloud Foundry….the list continues.

3.) It’s the largest gathering of digital performance experts in the world

We’ll have more digital performance experts in the one place than ever before.   More than 2000 attendees expected, across 35 countries, 90+ sessions and 45+ businesses represented – all of who are there for the same reason; to share insights and experiences.

If you haven’t registered you can do so here. Or maybe this personal invitation from our CEO, John Van Siclen, will help nudge you in the right direction.

John Van Siclen, Dynatrace CEO, invites you to Perform 2017

Hope to see you in Vegas!

The post Top 3 reasons to join us at Perform 2017 appeared first on Dynatrace blog – monitoring redefined.

Categories: Companies

SIGIST Spring Conference, London, UK, March 14 2017

Software Testing Magazine - Thu, 01/19/2017 - 10:00
The 2017 SIGIST Spring Conference will take place March 15. This is a one-day conference about software testing organized by the Specialist Group in Software Testing of the British Computer Society (BCS). In the agenda of the SIGIST Spring Conference you can find topics like “Test Heuristics”, “Help! I’m only human! Understanding and supporting the human tester”, “The Lean Startup Philosophy and Its Lessons for Testers”, “Push Your Functional Testing Further into Technology and Security”, “Continuous Quality Engineering in a Digital World”, “The Pillars of Agile Testing”, “UAT -that’s what you do with what’s left of your project, right?!”, “Don’t Get SMACked – How Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud technologies are reshaping QA and testing”. Web site: http://www.bcs.org/category/9264 Location for SIGIST Spring Conference conference: BCS, The Davidson Building, 5 Southampton Street, London, WC2E 7HA
Categories: Communities

DevOps: Making the Boring Things Stay Boring

Sonatype Blog - Thu, 01/19/2017 - 06:47
“I, For One, Welcome Our New Robot Overlords” is the title of Mykel Alvis’ (@mykelalvis) session at the 2016 All Day DevOps Conference. He wasn’t trying to curry favor with the new robot rulers, ala Kent Brockman, but, instead, was evangelizing on the importance of precision in...

To read more, visit our blog at www.sonatype.org/nexus.
Categories: Companies

Converting Conditional Build Steps to Jenkins Pipeline

This is a guest post by Liam Newman, Technical Evangelist at CloudBees. Introduction With all the new developments in Jenkins Pipeline (and Declarative Pipeline on the horizon), it’s easy to forget what we did to create "pipelines" before Pipeline. There are number of plugins, some that have been around since the very beginning, that enable users to create "pipelines" in Jenkins. For example, basic job chaining worked well in many cases, and the Parameterized Trigger plugin made chaining more flexible. However, creating chained jobs with conditional behavior was still one of the harder things to do in Jenkins. The Conditional BuildStep plugin is a powerful tool that has allowed Jenkins users to write Jenkins jobs with complex...
Categories: Open Source

Speaking Easier

Hiccupps - James Thomas - Wed, 01/18/2017 - 22:50
Wow.

I've been thinking about public speaking and me.

Wind back a year or so. Early in November 2015 I presented my talk, my maiden conference talk, the first conference talk I'd had accepted, in fact the only conference talk I had ever submitted, on a massive stage, in a huge auditorium, to an audience of expectant software testers who had paid large amounts of money to be there, and chosen my talk over three others on parallel tracks. That was EuroSTAR in Maastricht. I was mainlining cough medicine and menthol sweets for the heavy cold I'd developed and I was losing my voice. The thing lasted 45 minutes and when I was finished I felt like I was flying.

Wind back another year or so. At the end of July 2014 I said a few words and gave a leaving present to one of my colleagues in front of a few members of staff in the small kitchen at work. I was healthy and the only drug I could possibly be under the influence of was tea (although I do like it strong). The thing lasted probably two minutes and when I was finished I felt like I'd been flushed out of an aeroplane toilet at high altitude.

Wind forward to today, January 2017. In the last couple of years, in addition to EuroSTAR, I have spoken a few times at Team Eating, the Linguamatics brown bag lunch meeting, spoken to a crowded kitchen for another leaving presentation, spoken to the whole company on behalf of a colleague, spoken at several Cambridge tester meetups, spoken at all three of the Cambridge Exploratory Workshops on Testing, spoken at the Midlands Exploratory Workshop on Testing, spoken at the UK Test Management Forum, and spoken at a handful of local companies, and opened the conference (yes, really) at the most unusual wedding I've ever been to.

I'm under no illusion that I'm the greatest public speaker in the world; I'm probably not even the greatest public speaker in my house. But, and this is a big one, I'm now confident enough about my ability to stand in front of people and speak that it's no longer the ordeal it had turned into. In fact, at times I have even enjoyed it.

Now back to 2014 and that kitchen. I stood stiffly, statically, squarely front of the fridge. Someone tapped the glass for quiet and as I spoke my scrap of paper wobbled, and my voice trembled, and my knees knocked.


The worse I felt about the delivery, the worse the delivery seemed to get, and the worse I felt, and the worse it seemed to get ... After stumbling back to my desk I decided enough was enough: I was going to do something about my increasing nervousness at speaking in public. And so, on the spur of the moment, I challenged myself to speak at a testing conference.

Wow.

I found that the EuroSTAR call for papers was open, and I wrote my proposal, and got some comments on it from testers I respect, and I rewrote my proposal, and I sent it off, and I crossed my fingers without being quite sure whether I was hoping to be accepted or not. Then, if I'm honest, I made very little progress for a couple of months, until I came across Speak Easy.

Speak Easy team inexperienced speakers with experienced mentors to help with any aspect of conference presentations. It sounded relevant so I signed up and, within a few days, James Lyndsay got in touch. In our first exchange, this is what I told him I wanted:
  • Tips, strategies, heuristics for keeping the nerves in check - ultimately, I'd like to be able to stand in front of anyone and feel able to present.
  • Tips for building, crafting, structuring presentations and talks - I imagine that confidence in the material will help confidence in delivery.
  • Any other relevant suggestions.

Amongst other things, he asked me questions such as what did I mean by nerves? When did I get them? And what was I currently using to moderate them?

Amongst other things, he gave me a suggestion: "having confidence in your material can help, but not as much as knowing the stuff".

Amongst other things, he assigned me a task: visualising a variety of scenarios in which I was required to speak in front of different audiences (people I knew, experts in my field, experts in an unfamiliar field, ...) from different positions (presenter, audience member, ...).

Amongst other things he had me watch several talks, concentrating on the breathing patterns of the speakers rather than their words.

Based on my responses, he proposed further introspection or experimentation. In effect, he explored my perception of and reaction to my problem with a range of different tools, looking for something that might provide us with an "in". In retrospect, I think I could have done more of this myself. But, again in retrospect, I think I was too close to it, too bound up in the symptoms to be able to see that.

Amongst other things, and a little out of the blue, for both of us, he mentioned that I might look into Toastmasters on the basis of Tobias Mayer's blog post, Sacred Space, published just a few days previously. So I did. In fact, I went to the next meeting of Cambridge City Communicators, which was the following week, and I stood up to speak.

I reported back to James afterwards: I was thrown an "agony aunt" question and had to answer it there and then, with no prep time. I was nervous, I was pleased that I didn't gabble, I deliberately paused, and my voice didn't (I don't think) shake.  They told me that I was very static (they are hot on body language and gesture) and I ummed a little. But my personal feedback is that although I was able to some extent to overcome the shakes and the thumping chest, I wasn't my natural self.  I was concentrating so much on the medium that the message was very average. So I think I want to tune my goal in Speak Easy: I want to feel like myself when speaking in front of a group.

I can't emphasise how big a deal this last point was for me. It changed what I wanted to change. I realised that I could live with being nervous if it was me that was nervous and not someone else temporarily inhabiting my body.

Wow.

And that was just as well, because during this period I got an email from EuroSTAR. I'd been accepted. Joy! Fear!

So I signed up to Toastmasters and committed myself to stand up and speak at every meeting I attended, and to do so without notes from the very beginning, and to do it wholeheartedly. I learned a few things:
  • I can write a full draft and then speak it repeatedly to make it sound like it should be spoken.
  • That rehearsal lets me smooth out the places where I stumble initially, and find good lines that will be remembered and used again. 
  • Experimenting with how much rehearsal I need to get the balance between natural and stilted right was useful because I can now gauge my readiness when preparing (to some extent).
  • Standing and sitting to speak are different for me. Standing is much more nerve-wracking, even alone, so now I try to practice standing up. 
  • I can squeeze rehearsal into my day, if I try. For instance, I'll put my headphones on and (I hope) appear to be having a phone conversation to anyone I walk past as I do a lap of the Science Park at lunch times.
  • Speaking without notes from the start forced me to find ways to learn the material.
  • Doing it more helps, so I sought out opportunities to speak.

I attended Toastmasters religiously every two weeks and kept up my goal of speaking at every meeting in some capacity. The possibilities include scheduled talks, ad hoc "table topics" where people volunteer to speak on a subject that's given to them there and then, and various functional roles. Whatever I was doing, I'd look for a way to prepare something for it, or dive into the unexpected with full enthusiasm.

I frequently didn't enjoy either my performance or my assessment of my performance, but I found that I could see incremental improvement over time. I used James as a sounding board, reporting back to him every now and again about problems I'd had or victories that I felt I'd won, or about the positive things that attending Toastmasters was giving me:
  • The practice: to get up and speak on a regular basis in front of a bunch of people for whom, ultimately, it made no difference whether I was good, bad or indifferent.
  • The formality:  I found that the ceremony and rigidity removed uncertainty, allowing me to focus more on the speaking.
  • The common aim: the people there all want to improve as speakers, and want others to improve as speakers too, and that gives a strong sense of solidarity and security. 
  • The feedback: in addition to slips of paper filled in by each member for each speaker there is feedback on every speech from another Toastmaster, delivered by them as a speech in itself.

Talking of feedback, a summary of the advice I was given in the eight or nine months I was there might be: speak clearly, don't be afraid to pause, include variety in my voice, use my hands to emphasise and illustrate points, use some basic structural and rhetorical devices, stop rocking backwards and forwards and shuffling my feet, stop touching my nose

Other than the last couple, which are habits I had no idea I had, this is standard advice for beginner speakers. What's useful, I found, is to get it applied to you regularly about some speaking you've just been doing, rather than reading it in a blog post when you haven't been anywhere near presenting for months.

But enough of that, because suddenly it was the start of November and I was in a taxi, in a plane, in a taxi, on a train, in a taxi, in front of a stage at a conference centre in Maastricht waiting to deliver my talk.

And then I was on the stage. And I had a headset mic on - which I had never done before.  And I was coughing, and the sound tech was coughing. And we shared my cough sweets. And I was being introduced. And I was stepping forward from the side and ... and ... and ... amazingly I found that I was smiling.

And I was interacting with the audience. And I was making a joke. And they were laughing. And I wasn't shaking. And my voice wasn't catching. And I was delivering my talk in what felt like a natural way, with pauses, at a natural pace ... and although I can't be sure what I was doing with my feet, I can say that my head was very, very big.


Wow.

A few weeks later, I got an email from the organisers:
Thank you for contributing to the success of EuroSTAR Conference 2015, we hope you enjoyed the experience of speaking in Maastricht. We have amalgamated all the information from attending delegates and for your feedback scores and comments on your session are included below: Individual speakers were evaluated by delegates using a 1-10 basis (10 being excellent - 1 being poor).We categorize sessions by the following standards:
  • 9.00 – 10.00 Outstanding
  • 8.00 – 8.99 Excellent
  • 7.00 – 7.99 Good
  • 6.00 – 6.99 Low Scoring
  • Under 6.00 – Below minimum standard acceptable
Your score was  5.90 out of 67 respondents which according to above table, came in the Below Minimum bracket. The track session presentation overall average score (40 track sessions) was 7.51 Comments on Forms below:-
  • Well, fun but what am I going to do with this?? (+ some jokes don’t work on non-British people).
  • Accent!
  • as hard to understand if you're not a native in English language
  • The core ideas turned out more interesting than I expected, but needs post processing by me.
  • Good presentation but very specific to native speakers.  Really good work done on linking patterns but I think will not reach wide audience 
Wow.

And I'd got similar comments directly too. I'd known that including jokes themselves (in a talk called Your Testing is a Joke, about the links between testing and joking) was a risk to non-native speaker comprehension from my practice runs, and I'd changed the talk to reduce it. It's also indisputable that I have an accent (I'm from the Black Country and it shows) and I think that having a heavy cold probably contributed to any lack of clarity.

So it wasn't great getting this kind of feedback - duh! - but knowing what I wanted prevented me from being discouraged: on that stage on that day, however it came across to anyone else, I was myself.

Thankfully, usefully, I did also get some positive feedback from attendees at the conference and the content of my talk was validated by winning the Best Paper prize. But even without those things I think I'd have been able to take significant positives in spite of the audience reviews.

Back at work, I quickly had an opportunity to exorcise a demon by doing another leaving presentation. I treated it as I would a Toastmasters talk and wrote a draft in full, which I then repeated until I'd smoothed it out sufficiently. And then in the kitchen I wasn't rubber-legging and I wasn't heart-pounding and I wasn't knee-knocking, and tapped the glass and I spoke without notes and I got a laugh and I ad-libbed. And, sure, I stumbled a bit, but I was still there and doing it and doing it well. Or, at least, well enough.

I've been thinking about public speaking and me.

I wouldn't want to claim anything too grand. I haven't cracked the art of presenting. I still get nerves. I am not suggesting that you must do the same things as I did. I am not claiming that I haven't had some setbacks, and I don't have a magic wand to wave. But if I tried to summarise what I've done, I guess I'd say something like this:
  • I decided I wanted to change.
  • I found out what I wanted to change to.
  • I was open to ways to help me get there.
  • I looked for, or made, openings.
  • I reflected on what I was doing.
  • I stuck at it.

And I made my change happen.

Wow.
Images: Black Country T-ShirtsCambridge City Communicators
Categories: Blogs

TestComplete 12.2 Released

Software Testing Magazine - Wed, 01/18/2017 - 19:47
SmartBear Software has, announced TestComplete 12.2, which now connects to an on demand cloud testing lab. New Environment Manager, available with TestComplete 12.2, enables access to over 500 real testing environments comprising combinations of operating systems, browsers and screen resolutions. Environment Manager is powered by CrossBrowserTesting, a division of SmartBear acquired in 2016. Within TestComplete 12.2, development and QA teams can use the new Environment Manager feature to access services provided by CrossBrowserTesting, one of the fastest growing cloud testing platforms with more than 300,000 users worldwide. With more than 10 million tests run so far, CrossBrowserTesting provides a highly secured, scalable and flexible cloud containing more than 1,500 mobile and desktop browsers in more than 65 operating systems, including iOS, Android and Windows. The new Environment Manager feature enables development and QA teams to connect to CrossBrowserTesting and easily execute and report on automated UI tests. These tests run across more than 500 browser combinations, removing test infrastructure maintenance headaches for operations, development and QA teams. Multiple tests can be run in parallel, which speeds releases and increases coverage. Once tests are completed, detailed metrics summarizing pass/fail results across operating systems, browser versions and resolution configurations are available. Additionally, videos, logs and screen shots can be used to quickly identify issues. If needed, users can gain access to a live desktop browser to further debug issues like HTML, JavaScript and CSS incompatibilities.
Categories: Communities

Manage Security Gateway and OneAgent installations from a single location

The Deployment status page enables you to check the status and version of all the Dynatrace OneAgents installed on the hosts in your environment. Now, with the latest release of Dynatrace, you can also manage your Security Gateways from the Deployment status page (Security Gateways were previously listed at Settings Monitoring overview).

To access the Security Gateway list
  1. Open the navigation menu.
  2. Select Deployment status.
    The Deployment status page shows you at a glance which OneAgents were recently connected and which processes require restart following an upgrade of OneAgent. You can also upgrade to the latest version of OneAgent and enable code-level monitoring visibility from here.
  3. Select the Dynatrace Security Gateways tab to view the Security Gateways that are installed in your environment.
  4. (optional) Click the Install Security Gateway button to install a new Dynatrace Security Gateway.

The post Manage Security Gateway and OneAgent installations from a single location appeared first on Dynatrace blog – monitoring redefined.

Categories: Companies

Synopsys Acquires Forcheck

Software Testing Magazine - Wed, 01/18/2017 - 18:52
Synopsys announced that it has completed its acquisition of certain assets of Forcheck b.v., a privately held software company based in the Netherlands that provides a static analysis tool for detecting coding defects and anomalies in Fortran applications. This acquisition provides Synopsys with additional static analysis technology to extend the capabilities of its Software Integrity Platform and create new business opportunities. Forcheck technology will be integrated into Synopsys’ Coverity static analysis solution to provide support for software written in the Fortran programming language, which is a popular choice for numerically intensive scientific and engineering applications in industries such as oil and gas, military, defense and aerospace. The addition of Fortran to the growing list of languages and frameworks supported by Coverity aligns with Synopsys’ overarching strategy to extend its best of breed software testing solutions to a broader audience, from organizations developing web and mobile applications to software embedded in critical infrastructure and safety-critical systems. Coverity also supports analysis of software written in C/C++, Objective-C, C#, Java, JavaScript, PHP, Python, Ruby, node.js, and Android.
Categories: Communities

Introducing Ranorex Online – Now in Open Beta

Ranorex - Wed, 01/18/2017 - 16:10

How many hours a day do you spend making sure that your website looks and works as expected? Fact is that a website or web application is a determining factor for your online success, and its quality is defined by its functionality across all browsers and operating systems. But web testing can be a challenging task, and it’s easy to make mistakes.

We wanted to create a product that simplifies the way web testing is done, while at the same time making it more efficient. We are incredibly proud to finally announce the release of Ranorex Online beta! Compared to Ranorex Studio, this new web testing service focuses on the essentials of automated web testing, and provides the fastest and easiest way to improve the quality of your web presence in real browsers.

Start testing for free

Start testing in an instant

You can instantly start testing with Ranorex Online. This is the only web testing service that doesn’t require an extension or plug-in. Simply register for a free account on our Ranorex Online website to immediately test your website in real browsers. No matter where you are. No matter which operating system or desktop browser you use. The icing on the cake: it’s free-to-use.

As easy as surfing the web

Test your website the way your users will experience it. You don’t even have to code. The intuitive recorder makes website testing a blast and you’ll get instant feedback. Go to ranorex.io and enter the URL of the website you want to test to instantly move to recording mode. Click around, hover over elements, select items, fill out forms or walk through the entire online check-out process. Every action is immediately recorded. Curious how it works? Check out the examples on our website!

Ranorex Online Recorder Prepare your website for success

Free up hours of your day! We all know that the only way to make sure that your website always works and looks as expected is to test it in all possible environments. Ranorex Online offers an easy way to automate web testing. You have recorded a workflow on your website in Safari on macOS? Simply use the Play-Link of the recording to replay it across popular desktop browsers and operating systems. Chrome, Firefox, Edge, IE and Safari – now you can test it all with just one recording. It’s time to take the fast and easy route to improved website quality!

Make website testing a team effort

Capturing errors in all detail is difficult and reproducing them even more so. Now you can keep team members in sync and give feedback the way it is really needed. You want to show your colleague a problem you have found in your web application? Simply record it and share the Play-Link of the recording, even if she doesn’t have a Ranorex Online account.

Team collaboration

Proud to be of service

Ranorex Online is a software as a service. Based on your feedback, we’re constantly adding new features and functionalities, to make your testing experience even smoother and more efficient. We can’t wait to see what you think of it!

Start testing for free

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The post Introducing Ranorex Online – Now in Open Beta appeared first on Ranorex Blog.

Categories: Companies

Code Reviews for Test Automation Code

Software Testing Magazine - Wed, 01/18/2017 - 16:04
For software developers, the Code Review process has been essential for ages, but they can also be used in software testing when you create test automation code. It has been proven that it detects more bugs than any other form of testing, improves code quality, fosters knowledge sharing (for both the reviewer and the developer) and is cost effective. Code review can also be used successfully in Test Automation which will strengthen the collaboration between technical and functional specialists (Developers and QA). I will present our techniques for Test Automation Code Review; although it’s not the entire recipe, following them is an ingredient for better test code (clean, readable, simple, robust, bug free, extendable…). Video producer: http://www.testcon.lt/
Categories: Communities

Knowledge Sharing

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